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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 45334 times)

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #250 on: April 21, 2019, 08:11:49 PM »
I recently planted 16/1 mango in-ground recently.
As u can see i put 25 gal pot and torned the bottom pot to encourage roots not to go through the sideways (at least for the pot's coverage).

It would be interesting to see how it grows year by year.


« Last Edit: April 21, 2019, 08:15:50 PM by gozp »

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #251 on: April 21, 2019, 08:27:27 PM »
Taralay on turp



Guava on manila



Os on turp



Kathy on turp



M4 on turp



Pina colada on turp



Buttercream on turp




Phoenix on turp(pot)



Pina colada on turp (pot)


JF

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #252 on: April 21, 2019, 08:31:18 PM »
Great job Paul. Perfect example of what cultivars work on turpentine. All of our guavas died in turpentine on on Manila type rootstock (carabao) itís vigorous

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #253 on: April 21, 2019, 08:35:05 PM »
Coco cream seedling



Honey kiss seedling



 2 e4 on left to mid, right pina colada seedlings



Orange sherbet turp



E4 on turp



Honey kiss turp



Sweet tart turp



Lemon zest on carabao



Peach cobbler(formerly 2in1) on manila -2years old pineapple pleasure graft died




Pugged lemon meringue on manila - did not like the way ppk was growing.



Corriente with some grafts


« Last Edit: April 21, 2019, 08:39:47 PM by gozp »

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #254 on: April 21, 2019, 08:36:48 PM »
Great job Paul. Perfect example of what cultivars work on turpentine. All of our guavas died in turpentine on on Manila type rootstock (carabao) itís vigorous

I had 2 buttercream, 2 guavas from Lynn that died on me last uear on turpentines. So far so good. Some turpentines work here in my experience. However, manila or some specific seedlings work better than turps.

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #255 on: April 21, 2019, 08:42:46 PM »
Its very tough to grow mangoes especially in my area. A few branches were infected with antrancnose.

My interventions was to cut/ remove the infected part. Scrub neem oil and turmeric powder. Then seal it with iv organics paint.

barath

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #256 on: April 21, 2019, 11:46:43 PM »
Its very tough to grow mangoes especially in my area. A few branches were infected with antrancnose.

My interventions was to cut/ remove the infected part. Scrub neem oil and turmeric powder. Then seal it with iv organics paint.

Turmeric powder?  Interesting -- never heard of that being useful to deal with plant infections.

ATNNavy

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #257 on: April 29, 2019, 05:47:27 PM »
Hello all,

New to the Forum. Here are a few late afternoon pictures. Tree was bought from TopTropical in Apr. 2017. Don't really know to much about specific growing techniques. Hope to learn from you everyone here. Thanks for your time. Be easy on the feedback and criticism on current pictures posted.

Respectfully,
Noriega

Coconut Cream on mangifera.






ATNNavy

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #258 on: May 06, 2019, 09:20:08 AM »
I wanted to get some advice on pruning times and upkeep? I read most of thread up to current. Also, right now tree has white grubs. I'm thinking about putting "milky spore" but scared to commit. Don't really know side affects for allergy or will cause it to bring other pests? Thanks in advance.

palingkecil

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #259 on: June 12, 2019, 07:25:29 PM »
Coco cream seedling



Honey kiss seedling



 2 e4 on left to mid, right pina colada seedlings



Orange sherbet turp



E4 on turp



Honey kiss turp



Sweet tart turp



Lemon zest on carabao



Peach cobbler(formerly 2in1) on manila -2years old pineapple pleasure graft died




Pugged lemon meringue on manila - did not like the way ppk was growing.



Corriente with some grafts



may I ask where dis you get the honey kiss from? been looking for a honey seedling. Thanks!

Clay

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #260 on: June 21, 2019, 01:52:48 PM »
I'm trying to summarize my best approach for growing another mango tree here in Costa Mesa. From reading through this thread, I think I understand that the best approach is to plant a manila/ataulfo seed in the ground and let it sprout and grow. Then either do a graft when it is 1 to 2 years old, or wait until it is about 4 years old and top work the tree with the desired cultivar.  This practice will develop better root structure for long-term benefit.

My question is about the grafting part. As a newbie to grafting, if I get a 50% success rate with my grafting process, there is a pretty high probability of failing and losing my 2- to 4-year old seedling. I don't mind having a long-term project, but want to avoid having to start over from scratch each time one fails. In order to maximize my potential for success, would it be feasible to plant 2 to 4 seedlings very close together (maybe 1' to 2' spacing) in the ground (in the location where I want my tree to be) and going all the way through the grafting (or top-work) process to make sure it succeeds, and then removing all but the strongest tree? Or would the roots from the trees all mutually inhibit each other's development, thus nullifying any potential gains? Should I just stick with planting the seeds in pots, doing the grafting while still in the pots, and then transplanting to the ground after I know that the grafting was successful?

Clay
<<<< Clay >>>>
Orange County, CA 92626

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #261 on: June 21, 2019, 01:59:31 PM »
You can plant several close together and keep the winners.  Im doing some of that here.  Plant 2 or 3 trees in a hole and strongest survives etc.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #262 on: June 21, 2019, 02:48:09 PM »
you would  plant multiple seeds to pick the strongest seedling but not because fear of failed graft.....once you pick the strong one and let it grow..... top work it and  multiple new branches should emerge graft a  couple and you should have a couple branches to spare.   I got lucky all 3 took but even if it didnt you see I had back up. 




Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #263 on: June 21, 2019, 07:45:07 PM »
I'm trying to summarize my best approach for growing another mango tree here in Costa Mesa. From reading through this thread, I think I understand that the best approach is to plant a manila/ataulfo seed in the ground and let it sprout and grow. Then either do a graft when it is 1 to 2 years old, or wait until it is about 4 years old and top work the tree with the desired cultivar.  This practice will develop better root structure for long-term benefit.

My question is about the grafting part. As a newbie to grafting, if I get a 50% success rate with my grafting process, there is a pretty high probability of failing and losing my 2- to 4-year old seedling. I don't mind having a long-term project, but want to avoid having to start over from scratch each time one fails. In order to maximize my potential for success, would it be feasible to plant 2 to 4 seedlings very close together (maybe 1' to 2' spacing) in the ground (in the location where I want my tree to be) and going all the way through the grafting (or top-work) process to make sure it succeeds, and then removing all but the strongest tree? Or would the roots from the trees all mutually inhibit each other's development, thus nullifying any potential gains? Should I just stick with planting the seeds in pots, doing the grafting while still in the pots, and then transplanting to the ground after I know that the grafting was successful?

Clay

You wouldnt have to start over as long as the rootstock is healthy.it would likely send out new branches somewhere below the failed graft.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #264 on: June 21, 2019, 09:27:00 PM »
I'm trying to summarize my best approach for growing another mango tree here in Costa Mesa. From reading through this thread, I think I understand that the best approach is to plant a manila/ataulfo seed in the ground and let it sprout and grow. Then either do a graft when it is 1 to 2 years old, or wait until it is about 4 years old and top work the tree with the desired cultivar.  This practice will develop better root structure for long-term benefit.

My question is about the grafting part. As a newbie to grafting, if I get a 50% success rate with my grafting process, there is a pretty high probability of failing and losing my 2- to 4-year old seedling. I don't mind having a long-term project, but want to avoid having to start over from scratch each time one fails. In order to maximize my potential for success, would it be feasible to plant 2 to 4 seedlings very close together (maybe 1' to 2' spacing) in the ground (in the location where I want my tree to be) and going all the way through the grafting (or top-work) process to make sure it succeeds, and then removing all but the strongest tree? Or would the roots from the trees all mutually inhibit each other's development, thus nullifying any potential gains? Should I just stick with planting the seeds in pots, doing the grafting while still in the pots, and then transplanting to the ground after I know that the grafting was successful?

Clay

Hey Clay,

I plant lots of seedlings close together, about 1-2 feet apart and select the strongest ones to graft. Ive been doing some experimenting and itís really best to plant the seedlings and let them grow for several years until they get a thick trunk with nice scaffold branches before topworking.

If scions are limited or you donít want the troubles of topworking a tree or bark grafting, then you can graft the small saplings at about 1 month old or you can do epicotyl grafting which gives me near 100% success but your grafted  sapling will flower and slow down itís growth rate significantly. It is much easier to do a single graft compared to the multiple grafts required for topworking a tree but the growth is significantly slower.

Simon

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #265 on: June 22, 2019, 05:18:18 PM »
Hi everyone,

I finally moved to Dana Point and I am looking for a mango that does well here in a container. It seems like Pickering might be the best bet? How would nam doc mai do? Or is there another variety you recommend?

I might be able to put it in the ground and espalier it against a brick wall. That would help keep it warmer by radiating heat off the wall, but that area only gets about 6 hours of direct soon a day. I was thinking if going a pomegranate there instead.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #266 on: June 22, 2019, 10:09:28 PM »
pickering is a good choice if you want to keep it in a pot but mangos grow really slow here and I wouldnít be too concerned about selecting a condo type mango. Even a vigorous grower like Sweet Tart will be kept in check if itís in a pot. The yearly flowering/fruiting caused by our cold weather significantly slows down  the growth rate.

Nam Doc Mai is another good choice but again I would probably go with Sweet Tart just because it will establish faster and I much prefer the flavor of ST.

I recommend against planting Condo type Mangos in SoCal unless you really want a tiny tree that will hold very few fruit.

Simon

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #267 on: June 22, 2019, 11:53:07 PM »
Thank you Simon. Sweet tart looks really interesting. I do like mango with a little spiciness. Is there one like that you recommend?

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #268 on: June 23, 2019, 02:20:46 PM »
Have you tried any of the Indian Mango varieties like Kesar? Kesar has Indian resin spice and sets fruit for me even though I have lots of fungus in my yard.

There are other varieties with spice like Carrie that also sets fruit well in SoCal, not sure about your exact location though.

I would not recommend Ice Cream because it grows too slowly and gets very chlorotic when itís cool.

Simon

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #269 on: June 23, 2019, 04:47:06 PM »
I just moved to Dana point up on the hill about a mile from the ocean. I have not tried any mangoes yet since I came from Seattle. I have room (not really hah) for one tree. Trying to find the right one.

barath

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #270 on: June 23, 2019, 06:10:42 PM »
I just moved to Dana point up on the hill about a mile from the ocean. I have not tried any mangoes yet since I came from Seattle. I have room (not really hah) for one tree. Trying to find the right one.

That's going to be a tough location -- it's really cold for mangos in Dana Point both in the winter (deep, cold water offshore so lower lows than surrounding areas) and summer (marine layer, coastal breeze).  Not that the trees won't grow, but it might be tough to get fruit to set and ripen.  Still worth a shot, but maybe you want a cultivar that has small fruits and is known for setting in colder areas.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2019, 10:47:03 PM by barath »

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #271 on: June 23, 2019, 06:59:37 PM »
Or maybe a greenhouse could also help. 
Brad Spaugh

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #272 on: June 26, 2019, 12:54:43 AM »
Or maybe a greenhouse could also help.

Any suggestions? And greenhouse isn't an option unfortunately. No room :(

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #273 on: June 26, 2019, 01:40:53 AM »
If you are not dead set on a mango, cherimoya should do well there.

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #274 on: June 26, 2019, 12:39:35 PM »
I kind of was, but it doesnt seem like it is possible. I have never eaten cherimoya. I was thinking maybe a Longan tree.

 

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