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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 66047 times)

boxturtle

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #325 on: July 30, 2019, 11:10:16 AM »
anything you can do if scion doesn't push?  I grafted it almost 3 months now.  It's nice and green still but seems like it's just chilling. 

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #326 on: July 30, 2019, 12:46:10 PM »

You donít need to damage the husks by using a knife to pry them open. Just find the ďfiberyĒ part that runs  along the length of the husk, is you use your fingernails (or butter knife) and scrape along that fiber, you can usually find a small opening in the husk. Once I find that small opening/hole, I can usually jut pull the husk apart and open with my fingers without ever having to insert a knife into the husk.

I use a butter knife to scrap all the pulp off and try to pry it open. I guess I will have to look more closely for an opening. Can't seem to find one. I have been using a new method of taking some vice grips on the edges to squeeze and create an opening along the edge then using the butter knife to split open.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #327 on: July 30, 2019, 01:14:34 PM »
Buttercream on turp



Sweetart on turp


Lemon zest on manila






I was supposed to have more mango fruits but tons of mango drops due to the person that i asked to water, watered every 3 days on a 100 plus temps for about close to a month (when I was on vacation in the Philippines).


I dont care what people has to say such as: oh ur trees are too young carry a fruit, it will stunt it etc etc etc.

Unsolicited advice arent welcome. :)

More pics to follow such as kathy, os, m4 & etc.

Hey, you knew what I was going to say before I said it! At least you know what youíre getting yourself into.

Mangos naturally drop a lot of fruit and under watering could actually concentrate the flavors so maybe what your friend did, or didnít do, was a blessing in disguise.

Nice selection of trees. Please keep us updated on how they taste!

Simon

sammmy

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #328 on: July 30, 2019, 05:12:39 PM »
Those trees look like they are ready for phomopsis.

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #329 on: July 30, 2019, 06:46:37 PM »
Buttercream on turp



Sweetart on turp


Lemon zest on manila






I was supposed to have more mango fruits but tons of mango drops due to the person that i asked to water, watered every 3 days on a 100 plus temps for about close to a month (when I was on vacation in the Philippines).


I dont care what people has to say such as: oh ur trees are too young carry a fruit, it will stunt it etc etc etc.

Unsolicited advice arent welcome. :)

More pics to follow such as kathy, os, m4 & etc.

Hey, you knew what I was going to say before I said it! At least you know what youíre getting yourself into.

Mangos naturally drop a lot of fruit and under watering could actually concentrate the flavors so maybe what your friend did, or didnít do, was a blessing in disguise.

Nice selection of trees. Please keep us updated on how they taste!

Simon

I wish they watered every darn day. LOL. We were hitting constant 100+ when I was out of the country.

I will be bring all varieties at Franks next mango tasting.


Here is a photo that i Uploaded last april of my pina colada





Leaves as of now are lushier green than it was last Aprils thats with holding fruits.






gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #330 on: August 01, 2019, 01:27:17 AM »
Kathy holding 3 fruits before i left it had 13 holding.




shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #331 on: August 04, 2019, 12:10:55 AM »
I got this beautiful Pickering on Friday. What tips can anyone give me on container mangoes in SoCal? I was going to put it in a 10 gallon fabric pot and use BX Promix (https://www.pthorticulture.com/en/products/pro-mix-bx-mycorrhizae/) with osmocote. Will that work well for a mango?



simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #332 on: August 04, 2019, 12:47:17 AM »
Youíve got the right idea. Give it a fast draining soil mix with slow release fertilizer. Potted Mangos will perform much better if given occasional applications of minors and trace, especially Iron, Zinc, Magnesium and Manganese.

Donít over pot it, put it in a container that is slightly larger than its root mass. Once it fills in that pot with roots, up pot again with a slightly larger pot again.

In SoCal, mangos do most their growing in the the heat of the summer so you need to maximize growth between June-September by ensuring they are properly fertilized.

Right now is prime vegetative growing season for Mangos but since you just received your tree, you have to be very careful with over fertilizing. If you donít disturb the roots much, you can use a mild fertilizer but if the plant was rootbound and you have to trim the roots, donít fertilize it until it settles in.

This time of year, Mangos are very resilient with very little signs of diseases because the heat pushes growth and the growth out competes the fungal diseases and die back.

Now is also a great time to graft.

Unlike growing Mangos in Florida and other prime mango growing areas, you want your branches as vertical as possible.

One of the big mistakes SoCal mango growers do is to bend their branches horizontally. Horizontal growth will tend to flower and we donít want that for young non established trees. Vertical growth has a slight less tendency to flower but only slightly. Everything you can do to tilt the growth towards vegetative growth instead of blooms will be that much better for your tree.

Simon

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #333 on: August 04, 2019, 01:01:17 AM »
Youíve got the right idea. Give it a fast draining soil mix with slow release fertilizer. Potted Mangos will perform much better if given occasional applications of minors and trace, especially Iron, Zinc, Magnesium and Manganese.

Donít over pot it, put it in a container that is slightly larger than its root mass. Once it fills in that pot with roots, up pot again with a slightly larger pot again.

In SoCal, mangos do most their growing in the the heat of the summer so you need to maximize growth between June-September by ensuring they are properly fertilized.

Right now is prime vegetative growing season for Mangos but since you just received your tree, you have to be very careful with over fertilizing. If you donít disturb the roots much, you can use a mild fertilizer but if the plant was rootbound and you have to trim the roots, donít fertilize it until it settles in.

This time of year, Mangos are very resilient with very little signs of diseases because the heat pushes growth and the growth out competes the fungal diseases and die back.

Now is also a great time to graft.

Unlike growing Mangos in Florida and other prime mango growing areas, you want your branches as vertical as possible.

One of the big mistakes SoCal mango growers do is to bend their branches horizontally. Horizontal growth will tend to flower and we donít want that for young non established trees. Vertical growth has a slight less tendency to flower but only slightly. Everything you can do to tilt the growth towards vegetative growth instead of blooms will be that much better for your tree.

Simon

I have 5 gallon containers I can use now. It would be *maybe* twice the size of the rootball. I also have some Dyna Gro I have been using on other plants: https://dyna-gro.com/product/liquid-grow/ I could use that now as well. And some worm tea as well.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #334 on: August 04, 2019, 01:23:13 AM »
The 5 gallon should be perfect. You might have to re pot in a month or two but it will grow better than growing directly in a giant pot. The worm casting tea will be great. Wait until you see the roots before using the Dyna Gro.

You can pot your tree and if the roots are fine and you donít see any wilting about a week or two after potting, it should be safe to use fertilizer. If your tree is showing any signs of wilting, do not fertilize.

Since you just received your tree, you should gradually acclimate it to full sun.


Simon

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #335 on: August 04, 2019, 02:01:27 AM »
The 5 gallon should be perfect. You might have to re pot in a month or two but it will grow better than growing directly in a giant pot. The worm casting tea will be great. Wait until you see the roots before using the Dyna Gro.

You can pot your tree and if the roots are fine and you donít see any wilting about a week or two after potting, it should be safe to use fertilizer. If your tree is showing any signs of wilting, do not fertilize.

Since you just received your tree, you should gradually acclimate it to full sun.


Simon

Thank you for the feedback. I will up-pot tomorrow :)

Rnguyen

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #336 on: August 04, 2019, 10:02:55 AM »



Should I be thinning down the number of fruit?  I have about 25 mangoes.  The tree is about 6 feet with most of the fruit on the maha chanok graft.  The other is Carrie.  I recently grafted honey kiss on one branch, if youíre wondering where all the vegetation went.

Thanks.
- Rick

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #337 on: August 04, 2019, 01:40:46 PM »
With all the energy being pushed into the new scion, there's not going to be much left for the fruit. Or if the fruit is taking all the energy, then there won't be much left for the scion.

Look at it this way, the leaves that were removed are your energy source, and the fruit is the scions are energy users. I would remove all the fruit, because without sufficient vegetation to produce sugars, the fruit will not be all that impressive anyway.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #338 on: August 04, 2019, 11:37:20 PM »
Ideally, thinning should occur when the fruit are much smaller, like marble to thumb size.  Some of your fruit look like they are more than half grown in which case you should keep the larger fruit and remove the runts.

Simon

alangr088

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #339 on: August 05, 2019, 01:30:45 AM »
I had this scenario you are going thru RNGuyen. I was waiting for late July to remove all the fruit from my Manila seedling. I removed all the fruit (to get vegetative growth) and a grafting I did in April of PPK just came to life which I thought was dead. Pretty crazy how it lasted such a long time without any activity.


mangomanic12

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #340 on: August 05, 2019, 11:25:11 AM »
Rick i would listen to Oolie, remove all the fruit. If you want any vegetative growth next year....i would.
I think your tree is too small to hold all that fruit. I'm interested to see a pic of that tree next year at this time. If it grows great for you, if it doesn't lesson learned.
Let the tree fill out more before you let it hold fruit.


Mike

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #341 on: August 05, 2019, 01:49:05 PM »
Potted up my Pickering today:




simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #342 on: August 05, 2019, 06:26:35 PM »
The Pickering looks really nice. I forgot to mention that if youíre using new potting soil that already has added nutrients/fertilizer, there is no need to fertilize, usually for 1-2 months depending on how much you water.

Simon

RodneyS

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #343 on: August 05, 2019, 07:31:22 PM »
I had this scenario you are going thru RNGuyen. I was waiting for late July to remove all the fruit from my Manila seedling. I removed all the fruit (to get vegetative growth) and a grafting I did in April of PPK just came to life which I thought was dead. Pretty crazy how it lasted such a long time without any activity.


How much of a brown color did you see in the scion?  I have a peach cobbler that's turning brown.  Gives me hope and may delay me from grafting anew underneath the older graft

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #344 on: August 05, 2019, 09:49:34 PM »



Should I be thinning down the number of fruit?  I have about 25 mangoes.  The tree is about 6 feet with most of the fruit on the maha chanok graft.  The other is Carrie.  I recently grafted honey kiss on one branch, if youíre wondering where all the vegetation went.

Thanks.

Isn't Maha fruits starting all green and they turned to red/purple about a month before riping? I would pick off the smaller and deformed fruits. What rootstock you have here?

Rnguyen

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #345 on: August 10, 2019, 03:28:23 PM »
Thanks Simon, Sapote, Oolie, alangr088, mangomanic12 for your advice.  I went ahead and took off all fruit.  The new graft is pushing well and I'm getting vegetative growth on the existing grafts.  I'm looking forward to next year.

Sapote - it's a laverne tree so probably manilla.



Rick i would listen to Oolie, remove all the fruit. If you want any vegetative growth next year....i would.
I think your tree is too small to hold all that fruit. I'm interested to see a pic of that tree next year at this time. If it grows great for you, if it doesn't lesson learned.
Let the tree fill out more before you let it hold fruit.


Mike
- Rick

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #346 on: August 10, 2019, 03:40:39 PM »







alangr088

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #347 on: August 10, 2019, 08:47:25 PM »







Aside from these trees being too young to hold fruit and the growth getting stunted...is there any other negatives? Can the tree possibly just die due to exhaustion or anything like that?

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #348 on: August 10, 2019, 10:22:41 PM »







Aside from these trees being too young to hold fruit and the growth getting stunted...is there any other negatives? Can the tree possibly just die due to exhaustion or anything like that?

There is a high possibliity it could get stunted or for worst die.

However, i have been feeding my trees with heavy organic materials to lessen its chance to get stunted or even die.

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #349 on: August 10, 2019, 10:24:44 PM »




I have about 15 sweet tarts on a turpentine roootstock  & i dont like the way its growing. After i harvest my sweet tarts, i will be pugging my treee for a better symmetrical growth.

 

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