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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 45046 times)

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #350 on: August 10, 2019, 10:43:45 PM »
Iíve seen multiple examples of people letting their trees hold too much fruit when young and many of the trees have died. If you fertilize properly and donít overwater in Winter, the tree can easily survive.

Simon

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #351 on: August 10, 2019, 11:07:26 PM »
Iíve seen multiple examples of people letting their trees hold too much fruit when young and many of the trees have died. If you fertilize properly and donít overwater in Winter, the tree can easily survive.

Simon


I concur 100%.

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #352 on: August 10, 2019, 11:31:30 PM »
Don't Let young mango trees hold fruit. Most people want immediate gratification but success is for those that are tolerant and willing to wait.

In California, we have slow and poor growth as it is why give the young tree early stress of production? 

Be Patient. So many impatient growers.

Johnny

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #353 on: August 11, 2019, 01:07:46 AM »
Don't Let young mango trees hold fruit. Most people want immediate gratification but success is for those that are tolerant and willing to wait.

In California, we have slow and poor growth as it is why give the young tree early stress of production? 

Be Patient. So many impatient growers.

Johnny

I like to keep my trees small by letting them fruit and high possibility of them gettng stunted.

We shall see, im conducting an experiment on nutrients based on plant needs.

I'll post photos when i harvest all my fruits & on late fall.


gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #354 on: August 12, 2019, 09:52:04 PM »
No caption needed. 😂





hawkfish007

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #355 on: August 13, 2019, 09:32:45 PM »
IMO mangoes do exceptionally well during summer in Southern California whether in pots or in ground regardless of rootstock. It is the week long low 30s that get them. Here are my M4 in ground and buttercream in pot  exploding  :) They were originally in 3 gallon planted early June.





simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #356 on: August 15, 2019, 01:52:11 PM »
Yes, all Mangos should be exploding with growth at this time of year regardless of rootstock. If you havenít fertilized much yet, now is a good time to fertilize and push growth. No need to worry about excess Nitrogen inhibiting flower initiation in Winter. Now is a great time for minors and trace minerals as well, if itís not already in your fertilizer.


If your tree is holding fruit, donít give too much fertilizer at once, especially on hot days because your fruit can crack.

Simon

Johnny Eat Fruit

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #357 on: August 16, 2019, 07:32:42 AM »
My Sweet Tart mango tree is finally flushing now. Last year in 2018 it only had one growth flush. Hopefully this year I will get two from this tree. Time will tell.


Sweet Tart Mango Tree (8-13-2019)

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #358 on: August 16, 2019, 11:48:17 AM »
Excellent looking Sweet Tart tree! I love how bushy it is on top. Sweet Tart even performs great on Florida rootstock. You should be getting fruit on it soon. Please keep us updated on the progress of your beautiful tree.

Simon

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #359 on: August 16, 2019, 01:29:32 PM »
My sweet tart on who knows what rootstock from brokaw looked good for a few years but looks terrible after this winter.  The 2 year old ST seedling looks better. 

Manilla seedlng


Sweet tart seedling


Taralay from florida.  This tree has been through a few winters and still looks erect and healthy.  It may be a good one for so cal.

Brad Spaugh

SHV

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #360 on: August 16, 2019, 04:18:34 PM »
While checking out the new growth on my Choc Anon tree from Florida (presumably grafted on Turpentine rootsock), I noticed the branches are drooping over instead of standing erect.  Is this the infamous drooping phenomenon that we observe with some mango varietals on turpentine in SoCA?  Or is there something else of which I should be concerned?  This is the third growth flush from this mango in ground, but the first that I have observed this behavior.  Unlike the other ~20 in-ground mangos, it looks like I am getting some flower panicles shooting on a couple branches as well.  Choc Anon doing its thing?






mangomanic12

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #361 on: August 16, 2019, 05:23:31 PM »
SHV ,looks like typical droopy growth. Stop wasting time buying Florida rootstock trees especially if you are going to plant in-ground. My bet is that plant will just about stay that height in 2 years or wither away and die.....just being real with you!!!
Grow rootstock from a good mango seed or purchase a manila mango and graft onto it later.
Do your research on these boards you will find that not many people have success with Turpentine rootstock from FL.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #362 on: August 16, 2019, 05:47:41 PM »
Yup, thatís the typical droopy growth. You can stake up all the branches but youíll need a lot of stakes.

Like Mangomaniac12 suggested, itís best to plant some seedlings and top work them once they get large.

Simon

SHV

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #363 on: August 17, 2019, 12:02:20 AM »
Thanks guys. Unfortunately, I discovered this forum a bit late in the game, after several Florida trees were already purchased, struggled with, killed a couple, then searched online for guidance.   After spending more hours than I care to admit reading old threads, discovering how easy it was to graft, I planted several Home Depot specials (Manila) as well as other seedlings of various mango varieties acquired from Exotica last year. The seedlings were fairly priced and have grown gangbusters  since planted. The difference in growth compared to Florida grafts is shocking. Iím letting them establish strong root systems this year, then plan to graft next year.  I have already grafted some older seedlings that have traveled with me from a previous residence.  My FL grafts that appear to be fairly robust are Peach Cobbler, Pineapple pleasure, cotton Candy and Sweet Tart. I lost a Madam Francis, Lancetilla, and Fruit Punch.
My newest mango playground project includes 20 Ataulfo seedlings (planted today) and another 10 Kent seedlings (tomorrow) planted on my unused backhill. Hopefully they survive the gophers, rabbits, deer, winter chill, and every other obstacle we face in SD county backcountry.



MotherofDragons

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #364 on: Today at 09:44:27 AM »
Excellent thread, so much information!! What I didnít see asked yet is when is the best time to source seeds? Iím not familiar with the ripening times. There are a few local sales of mango trees coming up that I had hoped to buy a tree at. I had bookmarked this thread a while back and came back to read it all the way through. Now I am thinking of skipping both sales. The question is, am I late to the game to find quality variety polyembrionic seeds right now? I planted a store bought Keitt seed yesterday, but would love to source LZ, St, and others if possible.

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #365 on: Today at 04:14:33 PM »
Excellent thread, so much information!! What I didn’t see asked yet is when is the best time to source seeds? I’m not familiar with the ripening times. There are a few local sales of mango trees coming up that I had hoped to buy a tree at. I had bookmarked this thread a while back and came back to read it all the way through. Now I am thinking of skipping both sales. The question is, am I late to the game to find quality variety polyembrionic seeds right now? I planted a store bought Keitt seed yesterday, but would love to source LZ, St, and others if possible.

I don't believe there are any out of state growers of new Zill varieties that ship fruit to our state. It's too late for seed, as the season for any but the ultra-late is over (Keitt,Neelam).

Our season begins about now until February or so. I don't believe any in state growers are selling their fruit though. You may get lucky on seed.

There are many here living in similar areas to you specifically who have had excellent results with the turpentine rootstock on the varieties you are specifically interested in. I wouldn't be discouraged, you can always in-arch later.
« Last Edit: Today at 10:00:48 PM by Oolie »

MotherofDragons

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #366 on: Today at 04:24:33 PM »
Thank you. From my understanding shipping fruit into CA is a no-no. I strictly would only be looking for seed. I imagine due to the popularity of this thread and others (like the scion threads in BST)that we have at least a handful of CA growers who grow the Zill varieties. I was hoping one of them might have some seed for sale. I will just get some store bought ones for now and try my luck with those. I will also make a note on my calendar for next year; thanks for clueing me in on the mango season timing!

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #367 on: Today at 04:30:14 PM »
No worries, gotta start somewhere, and from what I've read, the sooner you get seed in the ground the better.

It's actually legal to ship fruit into California, as long as it has been treated for fruit fly larvae. Which really isn't economical for most growers.

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #368 on: Today at 08:07:15 PM »
Thank you. From my understanding shipping fruit into CA is a no-no. I strictly would only be looking for seed. I imagine due to the popularity of this thread and others (like the scion threads in BST)that we have at least a handful of CA growers who grow the Zill varieties. I was hoping one of them might have some seed for sale. I will just get some store bought ones for now and try my luck with those. I will also make a note on my calendar for next year; thanks for clueing me in on the mango season timing!

Looks like you may still be in luck, as there is a Zill variety that fruits in September (in SFL).

https://www.tropicalacresfarms.com/product-page/zill-m-4

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #369 on: Today at 09:16:51 PM »
Excellent thread, so much information!! What I didnít see asked yet is when is the best time to source seeds? Iím not familiar with the ripening times. There are a few local sales of mango trees coming up that I had hoped to buy a tree at. I had bookmarked this thread a while back and came back to read it all the way through. Now I am thinking of skipping both sales. The question is, am I late to the game to find quality variety polyembrionic seeds right now? I planted a store bought Keitt seed yesterday, but would love to source LZ, St, and others if possible.

I actually donít recommend LZ right now because it can have severe production and fungal issues. Also, I noticed that Kent, Haden and Tommy Atkins seems to perform better as a rootstock compared to Kent but thatís just at my location. As long as itís growing well, it should make a good rootstock.

Florida Mangos May not be available but itís worth a shot posting on the buy/sell forum for seeds. I believe the Florida season is pretty much over however.

Simon

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #370 on: Today at 09:27:33 PM »
Excellent thread, so much information!! What I didnít see asked yet is when is the best time to source seeds? Iím not familiar with the ripening times. There are a few local sales of mango trees coming up that I had hoped to buy a tree at. I had bookmarked this thread a while back and came back to read it all the way through. Now I am thinking of skipping both sales. The question is, am I late to the game to find quality variety polyembrionic seeds right now? I planted a store bought Keitt seed yesterday, but would love to source LZ, St, and others if possible.

I don't believe there are any out of state growers of new Zill varieties that ship fruit to our state. It's too late for seed, as the season for any but the ultra-late is over (Keitt,Neelam).

Our season begins about now until February or so. I don't believe any in state growers are selling their fruit though. You may get lucky on seed.

There are many here who have had excellent results with the turpentine rootstock. I wouldn't be discouraged, you can always in-arch later.

Actually, there arenít a lot of people that have had excellent results with (Florida) Turpentine rootstock trees. The people that have good results with them are generally more skilled and live in areas with more heat.

I have a thread or two on this forum and I have done some detective work and tracked down many of the people that claimed to have success with Florida Turpentine rootstock trees and after about two to three years, many of the trees were dead. I interviewed approximately 30 members, many of which had 10+ Florida Turpentine rootstock trees and was absolutely shocked at the death rate.

Yes, some vigorous varieties like VP, Sweet Tart, LZ will grow fine, even excellent on Florida Turpentine rootstock but try to grow a less vigorous variety or one that isnít so disease resistant and you will find that they donít grow well here.

Simon

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #371 on: Today at 09:57:38 PM »
True enough, my statement did not include appropriate hedging.

Most people live closer to the coast than MoD.

But MoD lives in the Inland Empire where it is very hot and dry, and the varieties she specifically mentioned are in the group which have shown to do well on Turpentine.

My advice in that post should be viewed as specific to the reader quoted, and I will edit it to clarify.

 

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