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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 66077 times)

Sandiegojane

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #375 on: November 06, 2019, 01:24:57 PM »
Thank you so much for your reply!  I'm afraid I'm not adventurous enough to try grafting.  Christmas tree lights I think could do, but not too much more. LOL!  I bought this tree (Fruit Punch) at the recent CRFG plant sale.  It is grafted, but I don't even know what rootstock it is on (the guy in that section was too busy and my daughter was getting impatient).  My hope is just to keep it alive and growing long enough to get some fruit.  I have one other Mango (Mallika) that I bought from Pine Island Nursery years ago, which is pretty small. I had 4 fruit this year, which were good (by my standards at least) but it isn't getting enough sun where it is located and I plan to move it. The fruit were on the side that's growing into the light (which side is doing well), but the other, shaded side is not happy.  I've been starting to root prune it and will relocate it in the spring. If if survives, I'll be happy. I give it about a 50% chance in my hands.  I wish I had more space and time to devote to gardening (sigh). Everything has to withstand periods of intense attention interspersed with periods of relative neglect.   

Samu

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #376 on: November 13, 2019, 09:05:32 PM »
My 4 years old Mahachanok scion is blooming now on its few branches, I thought it's rather early.
Should I leave them alone, or cut them off? Sorry if this has already been discussed on this thread, thanks!


Sam

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #377 on: November 13, 2019, 09:58:11 PM »
My 4 years old Mahachanok scion is blooming now on its few branches, I thought it's rather early.
Should I leave them alone, or cut them off? Sorry if this has already been discussed on this thread, thanks!



I have one of those too and it flowered all summer and has tons of fruit set on it now.  The tree is not even big enough to be fruiting.  Seems like not a good type to bother growing here. 
Brad Spaugh

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #378 on: November 14, 2019, 02:01:27 AM »
Thank you so much for your reply!  I'm afraid I'm not adventurous enough to try grafting.  Christmas tree lights I think could do, but not too much more. LOL!  I bought this tree (Fruit Punch) at the recent CRFG plant sale.  It is grafted, but I don't even know what rootstock it is on (the guy in that section was too busy and my daughter was getting impatient).  My hope is just to keep it alive and growing long enough to get some fruit.  I have one other Mango (Mallika) that I bought from Pine Island Nursery years ago, which is pretty small. I had 4 fruit this year, which were good (by my standards at least) but it isn't getting enough sun where it is located and I plan to move it. The fruit were on the side that's growing into the light (which side is doing well), but the other, shaded side is not happy.  I've been starting to root prune it and will relocate it in the spring. If if survives, I'll be happy. I give it about a 50% chance in my hands.  I wish I had more space and time to devote to gardening (sigh). Everything has to withstand periods of intense attention interspersed with periods of relative neglect.   

There was a bit of a rush of people, so I do apologize for not answering all the questions.

The trees are grafted on Turpentine rootstock.

I think the trees will do well for you, I have found mangoes to be particularly tolerant of neglect.

DSotM

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #379 on: November 14, 2019, 08:18:05 AM »
Lots of activity in Fresno. Manillas and Valencia pride are flushing. Keitt have been stuck with beginning leaf flush for over a month now - seems to grow poor here. Ice cream and ndm are flowering

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #380 on: November 14, 2019, 05:34:49 PM »
My 4 years old Mahachanok scion is blooming now on its few branches, I thought it's rather early.
Should I leave them alone, or cut them off? Sorry if this has already been discussed on this thread, thanks!



Mahas early flowers will usually set fruit so you can leave them on if your tree is large enough to hold fruit. Maha is pretty reliable here in SoCal.

Simon

Samu

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #381 on: November 15, 2019, 05:11:16 PM »
Thanks again for the replies guys, I decided to cut off half of the panicles, leaving the other half alone; let see what's going to happen with them this coming Spring...
Sam

JF

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #382 on: November 24, 2019, 12:54:25 PM »
Gary mango best late mango so far.






Greg A

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #383 on: December 04, 2019, 05:49:24 PM »
Can anyone identify the mango in the photo below? It is from a grafted tree growing in San Diego, but the owner doesn't recall which variety he planted. The photo was taken yesterday, December 3.


gregalder.com/yardposts/

ammoun

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #384 on: December 08, 2019, 05:22:54 PM »
Can anyone identify the mango in the photo below? It is from a grafted tree growing in San Diego, but the owner doesn't recall which variety he planted. The photo was taken yesterday, December 3.



It reminds me of Palmer but most likely it isn't.

K-Rimes

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #385 on: December 11, 2019, 10:11:48 PM »



Getting great growth out of this double rootstock Kent. (Indoors under lights as a winter test)

JF

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #386 on: December 13, 2019, 11:24:38 AM »
Gary mango still producing sweet fruits in December. Have a few left that will carry into 2020.







K-Rimes

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #387 on: February 19, 2020, 03:08:24 PM »
Getting a nice flush from this grafted diamond. Will there be any SoCal mango scions available any time soon?



shaneatwell

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #388 on: February 20, 2020, 04:40:22 PM »
For those of you in the San Diego area, i happened across what might be one of the oldest mango trees down here. Its in Escondido. About 20' tall by 30' wide and a trunk that looks to be ~18" wide. I'll add some pics later. PM me if you want the street address to have a look.
Shane

shaneatwell

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #389 on: February 20, 2020, 08:39:46 PM »




Shane

quemacoco

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #390 on: March 27, 2020, 05:13:41 PM »
Can anyone tell me where to get a Sweet Tart Mango tree?  I am in Santa Ana and have been looking all over for several months with no luck.

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #391 on: March 27, 2020, 11:55:38 PM »
You can probably get one from Plantogram.com but it will likely be on Florida Turpentine rootstock. Sweet Tart is on of the varieties that does ok on Florida rootstocks.

Simon

palingkecil

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #392 on: March 28, 2020, 02:46:11 AM »
Delete
« Last Edit: March 28, 2020, 02:48:10 AM by palingkecil »

palingkecil

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #393 on: March 28, 2020, 02:47:25 AM »
Plantogram will have grafted sweet tart around July, but they said it will go fast. If you want it, call plantogram and put your name and number, so you will get it first when they have it. Another alternative is, buy any mango tree from home depot and graft the sweet tart scion on it. Usually people will start selling mango scions at the end of August through September.

Sandiegojane

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #394 on: April 14, 2020, 07:01:07 AM »
Oolie, Thanks for letting me know - invaluable information.  I was really hot at the CFRF plant sale, so it's mostly my fault - I just wanted to get back in my air conditioned car.  :)

Simon,  I just saw this video from Chris at Truly Tropical:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fd_5JDBWYck
She suggests cutting of most but not all of the individual panicles of mango flowers on young trees (in pots) to keep them from flowering again, allowing the plant to put more energy into vegetative growth.  If you remove just 90% or so, she says it is less likely to send out another panicle, but removing the whole thing triggers bloom.  She also has some tips on pruning to stimulate vegetative growth.  I know she's in Florida, so the temperature effect will be different, but might be worth a try. 

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #395 on: April 14, 2020, 09:18:03 PM »
Thanks for the info Sandiegojane! Somewhere on this forum, I posted about that technique as well. Removing a majority of the blooms also decreases the likelihood that the branches will droop from the weight of a full bloom panicle.

Here in San Diego, removing a majority of the blooms will still likely lead to a second or even third bloom event if the blooms are removed too early such as if you remove 90% of the blooms in November, December, January and even February or later.

In SoCal, average nightly lows is the most significant factor in bloom induction.

Iíve posted this several times before but here is a great article on Mango flowering
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1677-04202007000400007&script=sci_arttext

Simon

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #396 on: April 14, 2020, 11:09:34 PM »
Thanks for the info Sandiegojane! Somewhere on this forum, I posted about that technique as well. Removing a majority of the blooms also decreases the likelihood that the branches will droop from the weight of a full bloom panicle.

Here in San Diego, removing a majority of the blooms will still likely lead to a second or even third bloom event if the blooms are removed too early such as if you remove 90% of the blooms in November, December, January and even February or later.

In SoCal, average nightly lows is the most significant factor in bloom induction.

Iíve posted this several times before but here is a great article on Mango flowering
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1677-04202007000400007&script=sci_arttext

Simon


Excellent article.

As it is, my trees have already begun the F/V Tr transition, so I have begun to remove flowers and fruit. Hopefully the rain in the forecast doesn't cause infection of the fresh wounds. I also remove some new growth from Lemon Zest. I've mentioned it previously, but for some reason the newer growth of this variety had cracks all over. Some black infection had begun on those cracks, and was beginning to spread, luckily I caught it when I did, as it was small and isolated, I've seen this type of infection work its way back to the trunk before.

Sandiegojane

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #397 on: April 15, 2020, 08:06:40 AM »
Thanks for the info Sandiegojane! Somewhere on this forum, I posted about that technique as well. Removing a majority of the blooms also decreases the likelihood that the branches will droop from the weight of a full bloom panicle.

Here in San Diego, removing a majority of the blooms will still likely lead to a second or even third bloom event if the blooms are removed too early such as if you remove 90% of the blooms in November, December, January and even February or later.

In SoCal, average nightly lows is the most significant factor in bloom induction.

Iíve posted this several times before but here is a great article on Mango flowering
http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1677-04202007000400007&script=sci_arttext

Simon


Thanks, Simon! 

I remember reading that article. Thanks for posting it!  I inadvertently confirmed the temperature effect.  When we had Santa Ana winds a couple months ago, I brought the small 5 gal mango I have and a few other plants in containers into my kitchen (around 70 degrees F and greater than the 10% RH outside) to protect them. The mango started blooming. I cut the flowers off and kept it inside for a few weeks.  It hasn't rebloomed yet, but hasn't pushed any new leaves either.  It's been outside for a couple months now.  I can just barely see some new green buds forming, but can't tell if they are flowers or leaves yet.  Guess I'll just bring it back inside if they turn out to be flowers. :)  May work for awhile, but was hoping there was an easier solution for larger pots or in-ground trees.  Oh well... 

strom

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #398 on: April 15, 2020, 02:08:41 PM »
Hi there:

I have read through this thread multiple times to allow the terminology to sink in, and am asking someone to kindly confirm or correct my understanding:  to help achieve best success with growing a mango long term here in So Cal, you either buy a tree that's an ungrafted seedling such as a laverne manilla and graft your desired type to it, or, grow your own seedling, which can serve either to fruit or a graft target.  Growing your own seedling will be true to type if you get multiple growths from one seed.  Yes?  There are exceptions to this, of course, I'm just trying to understand the general strategy.

Thank you!

Oolie

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #399 on: April 15, 2020, 07:08:10 PM »
Hi there:

I have read through this thread multiple times to allow the terminology to sink in, and am asking someone to kindly confirm or correct my understanding:  to help achieve best success with growing a mango long term here in So Cal, you either buy a tree that's an ungrafted seedling such as a laverne manilla and graft your desired type to it, or, grow your own seedling, which can serve either to fruit or a graft target.  Growing your own seedling will be true to type if you get multiple growths from one seed.  Yes?  There are exceptions to this, of course, I'm just trying to understand the general strategy.

Thank you!

Most of what you've stated is accurate according to multiple observers. The part about multiple growths is actually related to Polyembryonism in mangoes, where one of the seedlings is often a clone of the parent. It's not always a clone, you don't always get multiple trees to sprout from seeds of polyembryonic varieties, and even if you do, there's no guarantee that one of them will be a clone of the parent. Though there are experimental techniques being employed to separate the clones from the new offspring.

In Gary Zill's case, he crushes the leaves of the different seedlings and selects for ones with different sap aromas to the parent mango, in the case of those trying to germinate clones from seedlings, they select for aromas similar to the sap aroma of the parent. In any case there are no guarantees, but it is possible to get polyploid clones as well. Polyploid clones will be dwarf versions of the parent.

It's somewhat complicated, but in practice, many will succeed at getting clones to grow from seed. In my opinion, the rigorous selection put forth by Gary Zill brought forth many superior genes, and the potential to get even better results is quite high if someone were to continue with his technique, specifically improving on his work.

 

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