Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers



Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 65865 times)

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5626
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #425 on: June 11, 2020, 04:03:57 PM »
Are there any issues I should think about before grafting onto a waist-high seedling in a 5-gallon pot?

Would it be better/worse to keep it under grow lights in my garage for the first week or two after grafting?

If you want faster growth, itís best to plant the tree and not graft it until it is much larger and the scaffold branches have formed. If you graft with mature scions, it will flower in Winter and continue flowering for about 5-6 months every year thereafter.

If you must graft now because you want a lower graft or you donít want to have to go through the troubles of top working multiple scaffold branches, your suggestion of moving the potted tree into the garage for a couple weeks while the union heals is a good idea.

Simon

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5626
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #426 on: June 11, 2020, 05:07:48 PM »
Hey Jake,

Everyone would ideally come up with a customized fertilizer routine that suits their specific trees and soil conditions.

Everyoneís yards are different and one of the most important factors to consider is the pH of your soil. If your pH is off, your plants will not be able to uptake the nutrients you give it. For the more advanced gardeners, they will also consider the CEC/AEC by sending out soil samples for analysis. I just want to put out this disclaimer first.

I know some readers are probably thinking that this is overthinking the situation but the more you know about the science behind fertilizing, the better you will be able to troubleshoot if you have issues.

Ok, here is the simplified answer. In San Diego, our soil pH is generally high unless your soil has been conditioned over many years.

In general, I first adjust the pH of my soil with granular soil sulfur which will slowly decrease the pH of your soil. I add sulfur every year around Spring when the weather starts warming up.  A general purpose citrus fertilizer works fine for Mangos. Something you can find at Home Depot like Vigoro 6-4-6 is fine for Mangos.

I usually use 1/4 the recommended dose on the instructions but I fertilize 4x as frequently. I back off on fertilizer around late Summer/early Fall because you donít want vegetative growth going into cold weather as the soft growth can be an entry point for diseases. You have to be especially careful with smart/slow release fertilizer because it can release nutrients well after the application date.

The slow/smart release fertilizers are great for potted plants.

Once the trees are mature, I usually feed with with 0-10-10 or 3-12-12 plus minors and trace. I use this for most my fruiting trees.

In addition to these fertilizers, I add kelp emulsion around pre bloom to fruit set. Fish emulsion is also great for growth.

There are plenty of good organic fertilizers and they are slower acting and release their nutrients as the microbial life breaks them down. Cottonseed meal is a great acidifying fertilizer. I usually us a combination of organic and chemical fertilizers along with foliar feedings.

Because of the fungal issues we get in Winter, I like to add Silica to my fertilizer regimen. I use Potassium Silicate as a drench and a foliar to harden up the leaves and branches.

Around late Summer/early Fall, I apply some Southern Ag Citrus nutritional spray to give it some micronutrients and trace nutrients that Dr Crane recommended. I believe it was Manganese and something else I canít recall at the moment but I do remember that the Citrus Nutritional spray had both nutrients. It is supposed to help prevent Phomopsis.

Foliar feeding is great because you bypass the root system so soil pH does not affect the uptake of nutrients supplied via foliar feeding. A fogging system is recommended for foliar feeding if you have many trees. A spreader/sticker is also very important.

Much of the ground applied fertilizers are washed away and wasted. Slow/smart release fertilizers are more efficient but it is difficult to know how much remaining fertilizer is in the soil.

For potted plants, you can take an EC or PPM 500/700 reading from the runoff to know how much fertilizer is left in the soil.

Simon

greenmango

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • CA, Union City, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #427 on: June 26, 2020, 08:41:38 PM »
I'm new to mango growing. Thank you for this post. I learned a lot after reading the info. on this forum.

I would like to buy the following mango varieties as a fruit or seed. Please let me know how I can obtain them. I would pay for the fruits or seeds and your time to find them for me. I live in SF Bay Area in CA (zone 10a) so shipping may be an issue. If you know a source for these mangoes or seeds please help.

Cac, Xoŗi  Cat Hoa Loc , Nam Doc Mai, Nam Doc Mai #4, Honey Kiss, Maha Chanok, Butter cream,  SugarLoaf (E-4), Florigon , PPK, Lemon Zest, Orange Sherbet, Coconut cream, M4, Pina Colada, Cotton Candy, Pim Seng Mun, Pram Kai Meu.

I have a manilla queen in the ground and it is doing well. I don't know how old it is as the owner didn't know. Bought it from Vista and it was about 4 ft w/ a big trunk.  I have longan, cherimoya, and atemoya and they are doing excellent in the ground. I also bought 6 manilla mango trees from LaVerne Nursery 3gal and waiting for them to establish roots before putting them in the ground. In March I got two and in late May I transplant 1 in a pot and one in the ground and both have not had any new leaves. The leaves seem to be burned bc of salt water or sock? When I took the tree out of the pot the root ball was not attached to any soil, thus my new manilla I just got yesterday (4 of them) will stay in their 3 gal pot until next spring.
I don't know how to graft and I already made a novice mistake of buying a few trees from FL with turpentine rootstocks.
The plan is my gardener knows how to graft so he's going to help me.  I recently took out many trees to make room for the mangoes.
Thanks in advance for your help.
Nga

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5626
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #428 on: June 28, 2020, 03:38:13 PM »
Hey Nga,

I would recommend posting your seed want list in the buy/sell forum. Now is a great time to start learning how to raft from your gardener. I would not recommend Lemon Zest as a rootstock in SoCal. LZ seedlings grow fine at first but like an actual grafted LZ, the foliage and branches often get fungal issues and dieback.
Iíve planted out many LZ seedlings and some do fine in certain locations but others have had serious fungal issues.

Simon

greenmango

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • CA, Union City, 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #429 on: June 30, 2020, 12:40:41 PM »
Thank you Simon. I found a seller and ordered some seeds (30 seeds of 10 varieties). 
Does CAC  or Cat Hoa Loc do well in CA? I will have them in pots at first from seeds and was thinking of getting a grafted CAC tree to give it a head start.

I grow blueberries for the last 10 yrs and have bountiful harvest so I know how to work with soil ph for mangoes.  I also have cherimoya and atemoya and longan that seems to do well so far. In the coming years I should know more if any of these are  good for our climate. I also bought sapodilla, soursop, June plum, and sugar apples, Pickering, and Nam doc mai tree in pots, ordered from FL.

Cheers,

Nga

behlgarden

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2228
    • CA, Zone 10 B
    • View Profile
    • LED Bulbs for Landscape Lighting
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #430 on: June 30, 2020, 06:38:38 PM »
Thank you Simon. I found a seller and ordered some seeds (30 seeds of 10 varieties). 
Does CAC  or Cat Hoa Loc do well in CA? I will have them in pots at first from seeds and was thinking of getting a grafted CAC tree to give it a head start.

I grow blueberries for the last 10 yrs and have bountiful harvest so I know how to work with soil ph for mangoes.  I also have cherimoya and atemoya and longan that seems to do well so far. In the coming years I should know more if any of these are  good for our climate. I also bought sapodilla, soursop, June plum, and sugar apples, Pickering, and Nam doc mai tree in pots, ordered from FL.

Cheers,

Nga

I have a CAC seedling that is doing excellent, it keeps branching without tip pruning. I like its growth habit too.

simon_grow

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5626
  • USA, San Diego, CA, Zone 10a
    • View Profile
Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #431 on: June 30, 2020, 10:17:16 PM »
I agree with Behl, CAC is a good grower. CAC is one of those varieties that may need slightly more maturity or cold stimulus to bloom which is a good thing. My grafted CAC is currently holding a few fruit even with the worst Powdery Mildew I have seen in years. I sampled one CAC fruit that was absolutely incredible this year. It was super sweet with perfect acid balance and the texture and overall eating quality was top notch.  I highly recommend this variety for mango growers in SoCal.

Simon

 

Copyright © Tropical Fruit Forum - International Tropical Fruit Growers