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Author Topic: Growing Mango trees in Southern California  (Read 44853 times)

simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #300 on: July 21, 2019, 12:31:29 AM »
Why are turpentine mangos used in Florida for rootstock to begin with? I don't know, maybe because it hot outside working in the grove & you drink the juice out of 30 of them everyday? With all those seeds left over you might as well plant them.

I did however find this study on rootstocks from down under that might be of interest to you:

https://journals.ashs.org/hortsci/view/journals/hortsci/43/6/article-p1720.xml

I saw a post about turpentine not having a big tap root & and a video about air layering not being popular in Florida because you need a tap root with all the hurricanes. Not sure what to make of that?

Turpentine rootstock works excellent for Florida. It is adaptable to high salinity, some standing water and high fruit production. It just doesnít perform as well in SoCal.

I have a couple threads discussing Mango rootstocks and there are rootstock selection that are productive as small, medium and large canopy size trees.

Simon

FV Fruit Freak

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #301 on: July 21, 2019, 07:13:12 PM »
Hi Simon,
Iíve been planting a bunch of Kent seeds in pots, should I put the seeds in sun, shade, or partial shade? And if shade/partial shade, how long before they can take full sun? Thanks.

Thanks everyone,

Iím glad members are trying out some of these techniques I mention in this thread.

FV Fruit Freak,

When I plant my mango seeds, I keep them in full sun so that the soil heats up faster which makes them sprout faster. Also, by planting them in full sun, you wonít have to acclimate them to full sun.

If your seedlings are currently in the shade, you will have to gradually acclimate them to full sun by putting them in part sun and then gradually giving them more and more full sun. Cloudy days are great for acclimating seedlings. Protect them from the sun especially between 11 am and 2pm when the sun is directly overhead.

Alphonso is Monoembryonic and and I have no idea how it was selected. The more rounds of selection a variety has gone through, the more set the traits are. With re arrangement of the chromosomes from sexual reproduction, there is a good chance of getting something completely different tasting than compared to the Aphonso.

Simon

You da man, THANKS Simon!!
Nate Dogg

ammoun

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #302 on: July 22, 2019, 08:40:27 AM »
Thank you.

I'm dealing with root rot in many of my potted seedlings and now I'm trying to save as much as I can. Once the stalk surface loses a bit of its smoothness and the very fine wrinkles start to appear, is there ever a go back from there :D I'm talking about the ones before the browning at the stalk's base starts to appear.

I up-potted many seedlings, and for some reason due to overwatering most likely, the seed catches rot super easy. Is it a common practice to always leave the seed uncovered to reduce the chance of rotting underneath the medium?

A picture will help to diagnose the problem. Did you damage the roots at all? If itís getting wrinkly because of lack of water, it can spring back pretty quickly.

If your seedlings are getting a dark lesion close to the soil surface at the interface of the sprout and the roots, you may be using too rich a potting soil. Try something that has more inorganic matter like sand or pumice. You can also look for a good fast draining soil mix or cactus mix if you tend to overwater.

Simon

Please note the darkening at the base, and the rotting of the embryo. It's Turpentine.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 08:42:41 AM by ammoun »

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #303 on: July 22, 2019, 10:03:18 AM »
Is there a good write up or guide for starting mango seeds?

ricshaw

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #304 on: July 22, 2019, 10:18:34 AM »
Is there a good write up or guide for starting mango seeds?

YouTube

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #305 on: July 22, 2019, 10:58:02 AM »
Is there a good write up or guide for starting mango seeds?

Im currently starting a batch of ataulfo and kent seeds. Ive never had the success (as of now I have root growth from 100% of the seeds in about 7 days) with other methods. Using the plastic wrap is more useful because the inorganic material wont mold. Ive done the moist paper towel and it works but ive had lots of trouble with mold.  I got the idea from
https://youtu.be/Rwfn5BmaLdw . If you are doing 1 or 2 seeds you might want to follow his method completely but if you are going a lot of seeds and space is an issue the method im using might be better.


Materials
Mango with viable seed (has not been cold treated or sterilized) my seeds were hot water treated from mexico
Hydrogen Peroxide
Water
Spray bottle
Bowl
Ziploc sandwich bag
Box

Procedure:
1) remove mango seed from husk
2) combine 1:1 ratio of hydrogen peroxide (3% solution) with water in a bowl
3) add mango seed allow 24hrs
4) rinse mango seed in water
5) take plastic wrap and create a ring. Fit ring over the mango seed.
6) take plastic wrap and a 1. 5” diameter length that covers the bottom of the sandwich bag
7) lay length of plastic wrap at the bottom of sandwich bag
8 ) lay mango seed with plastic ring on the plastic wrap taking care to orient the seed correctly
9) spray with water a couple times.
10) seal bag and put in box
11) close box to keep out of sunlight
12) keep in a warm place with no sunlight/light
13) check them after 3 days to check for rot and any initial root development the bags should not show condensation

You should have root growth by 10 days.




spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #306 on: July 22, 2019, 11:02:25 AM »
Its not necessary to do anything special with mango seeds.  Just plant them in a pot or in ground under 1" of soil and keep the dirt wetted. 

Just lay it flat like this and then cover with 1" dirt.  A week later you have new trees.





« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 11:16:34 AM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #307 on: July 22, 2019, 11:40:29 AM »
Its not necessary to do anything special with mango seeds.  Just plant them in a pot or in ground under 1" of soil and keep the dirt wetted. 

Just lay it flat like this and then cover with 1" dirt.  A week later you have new trees.






Do you take them out of their husks?

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #308 on: July 22, 2019, 12:05:21 PM »
Its not necessary to do anything special with mango seeds.  Just plant them in a pot or in ground under 1" of soil and keep the dirt wetted. 

Just lay it flat like this and then cover with 1" dirt.  A week later you have new trees.



Going by the pic he does.


Do you take them out of their husks?

spaugh

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #309 on: July 22, 2019, 12:40:19 PM »
Yes of course, theres no husk in that photo.  Eat the mango, dehusk, toss in pot of dirt.
Brad Spaugh

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #310 on: July 22, 2019, 12:43:42 PM »
Yes of course, theres no husk in that photo.  Eat the mango, dehusk, toss in pot of dirt.

Thanks, I have 6 organic mangoes from Costco. Just checked and they are kent from mexico that were hot water treated. Hopefully they should work.

FV Fruit Freak

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #311 on: July 22, 2019, 02:26:00 PM »
Yes of course, theres no husk in that photo.  Eat the mango, dehusk, toss in pot of dirt.

Thanks, I have 6 organic mangoes from Costco. Just checked and they are kent from mexico that were hot water treated. Hopefully they should work.

Almost all my Kent seeds from Costco that have been planted over the last month or so have sprouted, FYI.
Nate Dogg

Clay

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #312 on: July 22, 2019, 02:27:48 PM »
Yes of course, theres no husk in that photo.  Eat the mango, dehusk, toss in pot of dirt.

Thanks, I have 6 organic mangoes from Costco. Just checked and they are kent from mexico that were hot water treated. Hopefully they should work.

I got the Kent mangos at Costco and have sprouted four of them in the last couple of weeks. It takes about 7 - 10 days for the shoots to emerge. I did wrap them in wet paper towels and let them sit in a ZipLoc bag on the kitchen counter for several days first, until I saw the little root tail starting to form. Then I planted them and the sprouts came up a few days later. The first to sprout are nearly a foot tall now. I plan to use them to practice learning to graft.
<<<< Clay >>>>
Orange County, CA 92626

sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #313 on: July 22, 2019, 02:48:02 PM »
I'm game to try grafting. I'm growing some brown turkey fig rootstock to graft various col de dame varieties on.

Where do you recommend to buy the sweet tart and Manila seedling?

mango and fig are total difference challenge to grow in your area. Listen to us when we say don't waste your time growing grafted mango from 3 ft pots; been there done that. Buy seedling or grow from seeds such as Kent fruits sold in July, August. Kent seedling will grow fast and vigorous, and perfect for grafting when 8 - 10 ft tall in 4 years.

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #314 on: July 22, 2019, 07:14:25 PM »
I found a Manila mango Tuesday at Home Depot and will grow out some Kent seeds as well.





sapote

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #315 on: July 23, 2019, 06:21:28 PM »
I used to de-husk the seeds , placed in bag, 85F oven and all of that, then started the germinated seedlings in pots. Now I just do this directly on ground where I want a mango tree permanently planted: In 80 to 90F summer plant a geranium for protection from strong sun, then place a seed or 2 (not de-husked) on the ground (not in or under) shaded by the geranium (the roly poly bugs or others will eat the de-husked tender seed), then cover the seed with stuffs from compost bin, leaves,  or fresh kitchen trash, 3 or 4" high pile.  Keep the pile moisted. In couple weeks a strong vigorous mango seedling, and in a few years if the fruits are not worth to keep  then I graft.

Seedling directly on soil grows faster than in pot.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2019, 02:28:37 PM by sapote »

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #316 on: July 23, 2019, 10:47:22 PM »
I damaged 2 of the 3 seeds trying to get them out. I assume these are too damaged to germinate?












simon_grow

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #317 on: July 23, 2019, 11:23:57 PM »
Iíve sprouted plenty of damaged seeds. Iíd just plant them and see what happens.

Simon

shaxs

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #318 on: July 24, 2019, 12:33:19 AM »
Iíve sprouted plenty of damaged seeds. Iíd just plant them and see what happens.

Simon

Thanks Simon. Already planted 😄

ammoun

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #319 on: July 24, 2019, 08:05:25 AM »
Iíve sprouted plenty of damaged seeds. Iíd just plant them and see what happens.

Simon

I concur, especially when the dents are not on the side where the root and seedling would emerge.

V

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #320 on: July 27, 2019, 01:58:31 PM »
This is a great thread, very informative!

A couple of weeks ago I got two La Verne Manila seedling trees.
The potting soil La Verne uses for mango trees is very bad. My two trees had pure wood shavings in the bottom 80% of the pot. The pots were topped with wood chips and some traces of sand.
There were very little roots in the wood shavings and they were all black, probably rotting due to the lack of oxygen.
I discarded all of the potting soil and planted one of the trees in the ground and re-potted another one with a good potting mix.

Yesterday, I also planted two de-husked Kent mango seeds in pots.

gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #321 on: July 30, 2019, 05:00:53 AM »
Honey kiss on turpentine



Pina colada on turpentine








Stakes werent needed before it fruited. Now that theres more weight, stakes are needed.



gozp

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #322 on: July 30, 2019, 05:08:04 AM »
Buttercream on turp



Sweetart on turp


Lemon zest on manila






I was supposed to have more mango fruits but tons of mango drops due to the person that i asked to water, watered every 3 days on a 100 plus temps for about close to a month (when I was on vacation in the Philippines).


I dont care what people has to say such as: oh ur trees are too young carry a fruit, it will stunt it etc etc etc.

Unsolicited advice arent welcome. :)

More pics to follow such as kathy, os, m4 & etc.

Goyo626

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #323 on: July 30, 2019, 09:38:01 AM »
Buttercream on turp



Sweetart on turp


Lemon zest on manila






I was supposed to have more mango fruits but tons of mango drops due to the person that i asked to water, watered every 3 days on a 100 plus temps for about close to a month (when I was on vacation in the Philippines).


I dont care what people has to say such as: oh ur trees are too young carry a fruit, it will stunt it etc etc etc.

Unsolicited advice arent welcome. :)

More pics to follow such as kathy, os, m4 & etc.

Do you think this person watered too often or not enough?

FV Fruit Freak

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Re: Growing Mango trees in Southern California
« Reply #324 on: July 30, 2019, 10:51:55 AM »
I damaged 2 of the 3 seeds trying to get them out. I assume these are too damaged to germinate?












You donít need to damage the husks by using a knife to pry them open. Just find the ďfiberyĒ part that runs  along the length of the husk, is you use your fingernails (or butter knife) and scrape along that fiber, you can usually find a small opening in the husk. Once I find that small opening/hole, I can usually jut pull the husk apart and open with my fingers without ever having to insert a knife into the husk.
Nate Dogg

 

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