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Author Topic: Pineapple -- a tough crown  (Read 241 times)

zands

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Pineapple -- a tough crown
« on: March 20, 2017, 10:49:14 AM »
Hacked off a supermarket pineapple crown and left it in water for three weeks. I forgot about it. The center leaves where new leaves come from rotted away. I neglected it some more and now I see a comeback from the center with tiny new leaves spouting coming back.

So I would say these crowns are strong
To be planted soon!

FruitFreak

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 12:00:14 PM »
Hacked off a supermarket pineapple crown and left it in water for three weeks. I forgot about it. The center leaves where new leaves come from rotted away. I neglected it some more and now I see a comeback from the center with tiny new leaves spouting coming back.

So I would say these crowns are strong
To be planted soon!

I've found the best way for me is to forgo leaving it in water and plant directly into soil after pulling off some of the lower leaves to expose root nubs.  You can also quarter one pineapple top and have Four new plants.
- Marley

Galka

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2017, 12:03:24 PM »
The same have happened to a couple of my tops. I even have one rooting in a water right now, will take a picture.

Finca La Isla

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2017, 12:57:06 PM »
Why put it in water?
No pineapple grower would do that here.  They start fine in soil and the roots will be less brittle, more adapted, to the eventual medium.
Picking off the lower leaves is correct.
Peter

baccarat0809

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2017, 01:12:25 PM »
Hacked off a supermarket pineapple crown and left it in water for three weeks. I forgot about it. The center leaves where new leaves come from rotted away. I neglected it some more and now I see a comeback from the center with tiny new leaves spouting coming back.

So I would say these crowns are strong
To be planted soon!

I've found the best way for me is to forgo leaving it in water and plant directly into soil after pulling off some of the lower leaves to expose root nubs.  You can also quarter one pineapple top and have Four new plants.

If you quarter the pineapple does it take much longer to produce a new fruit, or is it still the same amount of time?

OCchris1

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2017, 01:23:35 AM »
I too put mine directly into the dirt (after pulling off most of the base leaves). I never had any luck with the water routine. Chris

sildanani

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 02:09:22 AM »
Water method hasn't been practical for me. Water gets gross too quickly from algae, bacteria, etc. Like previously mentioned, its best to just stick the tops in dirt. I use a bit of rooting powder. Rooting pineapple tops has been a trial and error process. But once you get it, they are super easy to propagate. Keep the soil damp and not soggy. Also keep that humidity up!
Anisha

gnappi

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2017, 04:25:51 AM »
Cutting the top into fours? I read that growers of rareish types drive a stake sideways through the top to prevent unauthorized tops from growing? I'll give this a try on my unusual cultivars when they fruit.
Regards,

   Gary

bsbullie

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2017, 06:59:58 AM »
Why put it in water?
No pineapple grower would do that here.  They start fine in soil and the roots will be less brittle, more adapted, to the eventual medium.
Picking off the lower leaves is correct.
Peter

Probably same reason people put avocado seeds in water...
- Rob

Mark in Texas

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2017, 08:54:03 AM »
Twist off the top, never cut.  Starting at the bottom pull off the small leaves going up 3-6 rows of them. Nubs are roots.  Leave out on counter for a day to callous over.  Plant in soil and stake. Water with a 9-3-6 with micros. (They love N and Fe IN the cup).  Dyna-Gro Foliage Pro is excellent.  Harvest when gold top to bottom.  Enjoy the richest, sweetest fruit on the planet. (With the exception of the cherimoyas we are eating)





zands

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Re: Pineapple -- a tough crown
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2017, 11:09:54 AM »
Twist off the top, never cut.  Starting at the bottom pull off the small leaves going up 3-6 rows of them. Nubs are roots.  Leave out on counter for a day to callous over.  Plant in soil and stake. Water with a 9-3-6 with micros. (They love N and Fe IN the cup).  Dyna-Gro Foliage Pro is excellent.  Harvest when gold top to bottom.  Enjoy the richest, sweetest fruit on the planet. (With the exception of the cherimoyas we are eating)





Second photo shows the ripest pineapple in Texas. Good going! Your greenhouse is paying off in ripe pineapple. In South Florida we get lots of imported Central American pineapple and as cheap as $1.25 at times. Sometimes they come in green. Sometimes they come in as golden ripe as yours, as the Central American growers try to hustle them to US markets before they rot in the fields

I read Hawaii no longer grows pineapples on a commercial scale. Asian Thai? exports undercut them on the West Coast and on the East Coast/at least in South Florida/ the CentAm pineapples rule. The golden flesh ones. The white flesh ones of old are out! Those were old school Hawaiian that must have had best export qualities to reach East Coast America intact ...but way too acid.

You can still visit the Dole Pineapple museum in Hawaii and see a field of them outside.

 

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