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Author Topic: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience  (Read 8475 times)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #25 on: March 20, 2019, 01:30:21 AM »
It appears the plant is now dead. It did not survive through the snow in February.
I believe this plant was own-root and it might have been different if it had been grafted onto trifoliate rootstock.


A regular Satsuma (on dwarf rootstock) did survive but it was covered. There were three gallon water containers under the cover but they never froze (I went out and checked on them during the coldest point in the Winter very early in the morning).
« Last Edit: March 20, 2019, 01:35:38 AM by SoCal2warm »

mrtexas

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #26 on: April 26, 2019, 10:54:22 PM »
You had -6F December 23, 1983. You are dreaming if you
believe zone 8a

SoCal2warm

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2019, 10:30:20 PM »
The Satsuma now appears dead too.

So it appears that a small sized Satsuma on dwarf rootstock, covered by a clear vinyl plastic enclosure, was not able to survive.
An Arctic Frost growing on its own roots, not protected, in a kind of shady spot, which was moved outside a little too early in early March with very cool but not freezing temperatures, died back and then recovered, was not able to survive either.

But this was definitely a colder Winter than usual. Snow 16-18 inches deep (which is unusual here) and temperatures in the yard that I estimate went down to about 14 F.

It is in zone 8a, but in the Pacific Northwest where temperatures do not really begin consistently rising until very late April.

The Arctric Frost might have done better if it had been grafted onto trifoliate and if it had not been growing inside and suddenly transferred into the cold outside in March, which resulted in a fair amount of die-back due to the sudden transition, which may have put it in a position not to be able to handle the following Winter as well. Perhaps planting it in a warmer sunnier spot might also have helped.

For comparison, the Yuzu on dwarf rootstock (probably the same rootstock variety because same nursery) survived, still has retained a few of its leaves, although it looks like it has gone through an ordeal and there is just a little bit of branch die-back at the extremities.


What I think this proves is that an Arctic Frost is not going to easily survive a cold winter in the Pacific Northwest region.

This is of course a very different situation from Texas and the South.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2019, 10:39:34 PM by SoCal2warm »

Ilya11

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #28 on: April 30, 2019, 03:11:11 AM »

But this was definitely a colder Winter than usual. Snow 16-18 inches deep (which is unusual here) and temperatures in the yard that I estimate went down to about 14 F.

It is in zone 8a, but in the Pacific Northwest where temperatures do not really begin consistently rising until very late April.

14F is  what  should occur in USDA zone 8a (10F-15F) almost all the time.
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                       Ilya

seattlefiggirl

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2020, 07:57:53 PM »


“When planting in the ground, protection from cold by wrapping with frost cloth for the first year or two is recommended,” Pemberton said. “A site protected from the north wind will also help with winter survival.”

https://agrilifetoday.tamu.edu/2015/06/10/arctic-frost-satsuma-mandarin-hybrid-named-new-texas-superstar/

I'm also in PNW im interested in growing citrus outdoors not yuzu. Thank you for your updates on the arctic frost satsuma. I think it is cold hardy to 15 degrees when matured. This article recommended to have a shelter near the house for extra protection and frost cover for the first few years until more established. I think it is possible. But im unable to test this due to no room right next to my house to plant in ground. So i will just have to try for frost cover. Please keep us updated on your outdoor cold hardy citrus.
Please subscribe to my youtube channel growing fruits in zone 8B Seattle PNW http://www.youtube.com/c/kimtien

kumin

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2020, 09:36:10 PM »
My understanding is that frost cloth is most effective when it covers the entire canopy, then drops straight down and is secured to the soil with no gaps. The perimeter at soil contact should be the same as the canopy perimeter. The frost cloth should not be tied to the trunk at the soil line.

The objective is to capture the slight warmth rising from the soil under the tree. The frost cloth serves as a modest thermal barrier between the soil and the cold night sky, with the tree being within the protective envelope.

The effect can be further enhanced by temporarily covering the frost cloth with poly film. This is most beneficial under windy conditions. During sunny days this can create excessive heat being trapped under the covers, so it's best to use poly film in temporary, extreme conditions. Cooking the plants is not preferable to freezing them!
« Last Edit: February 14, 2020, 04:01:51 AM by kumin »

CarolinaZone

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #31 on: March 01, 2020, 09:33:30 AM »
Does anybody here know of a good online nursery that will ship these? I would be willing to drive if there there was a place to buy them in New Orleans.

Bomand

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #32 on: March 01, 2020, 10:09:31 AM »
There are several places in New Orleans that have what you need. Look on Facebook Marketplace under Citrus for sale in New Orleans.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2020, 02:35:16 PM by Millet »

Bomand

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Re: Arctic Frost Satsuma experience
« Reply #33 on: March 01, 2020, 04:17:56 PM »
I have planted and grafted the Artic Frost mandrin and have found it less hardy than Owari, Armstrong, Brown Select and Early St Anne. In fact I found it impacted at 28 and29 degrees....leaf burn and twig die back while standard mandrins suffered no ill.

 

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