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Author Topic: Frost Protection  (Read 4664 times)

kumin

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #50 on: November 27, 2019, 04:09:56 AM »
Usirius, I agree with your concern for overheating with heat lamps. I previously had a small duck hatchery and used heat lamps to brood newly hatched ducklings. The proximity to the bulbs was critical and I discontinued their use due to the fire hazard. They can have a desiccating, even a roasting effect, if not used very carefully.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2019, 06:20:50 PM by kumin »

lebmung

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #51 on: November 27, 2019, 04:30:50 PM »
I referring to the infrared bulb mentioned by lebmung. Will it work on an infrared heat lamp?

I was heating mu dog with that last winter 150W. It did pretty warm and the door can be open.
I think this os a solution for older trees that are cold hardy. So when a very low temperature come they will make it through. You need to measure the leaf temperature not to burn them. I will make a test when freezing comes.

hardyvermont

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #52 on: December 08, 2019, 03:53:47 PM »
My Home Depot has Thermo Cube as a seasonal item.  They had 4 and would not be restocking.  They are also available on Amazon. 
« Last Edit: December 09, 2019, 04:19:12 AM by hardyvermont »

will2358

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #53 on: December 23, 2019, 05:09:36 AM »
This is how I protect mine.  I am in zone 8a also, about 75 miles south of you.




So far has worked fairly well.  I haven't lost a tree yet, though I have had some minor damage.


TFN
TFN were do you get the barrels? Do you fill them with water?
My name is Cindy

poncirsguy

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #54 on: March 18, 2020, 09:36:55 PM »
My cold protection setup.  On the left is my grafted Meiwa to kuharske citrange.  Middle picture left New Zealand lemonade on C35 roots. to the right Valentine pomelo on US897 root.  last picture is seedling Fukushu kumquat.  Structures come down after danger of frost has passed for my USDA zone 6a/b growing zone.





« Last Edit: March 19, 2020, 08:44:48 AM by poncirsguy »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #55 on: March 20, 2020, 03:50:37 PM »
Well, I haven't had good luck with my frost protection. It seems that enclosing the frame with transparent vinyl plastic leads to a greenhouse effect during sunny days, which can lead to the plant starting to come out of dormancy, and then the cold night comes and the temperature rapidly swings in the other direction. The daytime difference between inside and outside can be great, whereas the nighttime differences are only a few degrees. The hardy citrus does not handle these temperatures swings very well. Or at least that's what it seems like.

Probably would have been better to use an opaque white enclosure to avoid excessive heat build-up. Maybe even with a small vent on top to be able to leak out excessive heat.

kumin

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #56 on: March 20, 2020, 04:44:21 PM »
Increasing the air volume has a partial mitigating effect as it tempers the overheating problem a bit. White overwintering film with 55-70 % blocking is very useful in reducing overheating. As you mentioned, simply venting hot air to the exterior is immediately effective.

poncirsguy

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #57 on: March 20, 2020, 07:10:58 PM »
I need to add that the glass used on my enclosures are made of double sets of Low-E windows.  My enclosure does not heat up uncontrollable on bright sunny days.  The biggest enclosure has plane glass at the bottom so that what heat comes in heats the soil to aid in roots moving water as  needed.  It holds heat down to 15F over night so that plants don't see  frost.  There is also enough humidity so that the inner layer of 4 layers glass can keep from freezing through condensation and at last freeze-frost.  still locked at 32F until the humidity is gone.  That takes a long time.  Heat of condensation 520 cal/gram.  Heat of fusion another 80 cal/ gram.  I plan to use an open barrel of 60F water as a heat source to provide the humidity to provide my condensate freeze heating system when the final shape of  my greenhouse is determined.

kumin

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Re: Frost Protection
« Reply #58 on: May 17, 2020, 07:17:04 AM »
 https://www.as-garten.de/ueberwinterungszelt-igloo



Of course, if you have some technical skills, you can reproduce this solution in these or other dimensions.

The geometrics of this protective enclosure are well designed. By narrowing the top exposure, wind and night sky radiant cooling are reduced. By maximizing ground exposure, warmth radiating from the soil is captured at an increased rate.

So for me, it appears to be based on sound theory. Actual field conditions may confirm, or refute the concept.

As I look at the photo in greater detail, I see there's a floor on the bottom. This would block the warmth from the soil. I believe this may not be as practical as I originally thought.

The design may be eye catching for marketing purposes. A bit like designing fishing lures to catch the eye of the angling customer more than the actual fish.

« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 07:26:30 AM by kumin »

 

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