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Author Topic: Citsuma Prague  (Read 31037 times)

hardyvermont

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #125 on: December 13, 2019, 02:06:05 PM »
Great to see your pictures.  What is the size of the fruit?

Florian

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #126 on: December 13, 2019, 03:28:31 PM »
I forgot to measure it but it weighed exactly 70 grams.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #127 on: January 14, 2020, 04:55:46 PM »
Here's a picture of the Citsuma Prague I saw in Jim's yard

(in Vancouver, WA, right across the bridge from Portland)

jim VH

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #128 on: January 15, 2020, 03:53:49 PM »
Thank you Socal, for posting that image of my tree. 
I harvested the fruit on that in mid-November.  About 6 lbs.  They range in size from sub-ping-pong ball to medium size Satsuma.  The flavor is good, but rather sour.  Ripeness varies considerably.  The ripest ones have 'squishy' peels and peel rather easily, though not so easily as Satsumas.  Since snow flurries are occurring, I think I'll stay indoors and use the time to do a Brix and Acid level reading this afternoon, using the smaller ones.



I apologize for the blurriness of the image, but I ain't no photographer.  The fruit above the ruler are some of the Citsumas; I've eaten the largest few, and juiced a few others for a Chinese dish.  The three fruit on the bottom of the image are typical LA Early Satsumas, to provide scale, along with the blurry ruler.

Citradia

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #129 on: January 16, 2020, 09:29:34 PM »
Itís nice to know someone in the USA has citsuma Prague. Maybe it can become easier to come by.

Florian

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #130 on: January 17, 2020, 09:04:57 AM »
Thank you Socal, for posting that image of my tree. 
I harvested the fruit on that in mid-November.  About 6 lbs.  They range in size from sub-ping-pong ball to medium size Satsuma.  The flavor is good, but rather sour.  Ripeness varies considerably.  The ripest ones have 'squishy' peels and peel rather easily, though not so easily as Satsumas.  Since snow flurries are occurring, I think I'll stay indoors and use the time to do a Brix and Acid level reading this afternoon, using the smaller ones.



I apologize for the blurriness of the image, but I ain't no photographer.  The fruit above the ruler are some of the Citsumas; I've eaten the largest few, and juiced a few others for a Chinese dish.  The three fruit on the bottom of the image are typical LA Early Satsumas, to provide scale, along with the blurry ruler.

Thanks for your comparison, Jim! May I ask if your Prague is a regular bearer? Has it ever had trouble fruiting?

jim VH

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #131 on: January 17, 2020, 11:04:25 AM »
Hi Florian

It's bloomed for a couple years, but this is the first year it's set fruit.  Unlike earlier blooms, this year was a very heavy bloom, and it took place over a very long time; Starting on May 5th and ending on June 30th- nearly two months.  All my other citrus typically bloom within a 2-3 week period in mid-May or so, save the Flying Dragon, which blooms in March.  The extended bloom time probably accounts for at least part of the wide variation in size, and also sourness.

Also, the Brix numbers for the Prague Citsuma:

Brix= 11.8  Tartaric Acid= 2.8% and the sugar to acid ratio is 4.2.  This is rather on the sour side, thoug individual fruit are much sweeteer.  This is an average over a number of fruit- some are much sweeter and some are sourer.

For comparison, the Satsumas have sugar to acid ratios of 7.3 and 9.0

This was a rather cool summer; Warmer summers may produce sweeter fruit

Florian

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #132 on: May 05, 2020, 03:44:11 PM »
My in-ground Prague sailed through its first winter unscathed. It was a very mild winter with a low of around only -5 C. It has flowered for the first time but not set fruit (which is not surprising).



jim VH

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #133 on: May 11, 2020, 11:31:07 AM »
My Prague Citsuma is a couple weeks into  it's bloom; the second heavy bloom in a row.  Last years bloom set; hopefully this year's will as well.


An interesting mixture of partially formed incomplete blooms and fully formed complete blooms.

Zitrusgaertner

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #134 on: May 14, 2020, 08:21:54 AM »
this "Chimerer Prage" is very different from mine. Where do the winged petioles come from? The leaves resume some Yuzu or other C.ichagensis hybrid. Very strange!

Sylvain

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #135 on: May 15, 2020, 03:28:35 AM »
To follow on Prague and Prague chimera.

Millet

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #136 on: May 15, 2020, 10:14:58 AM »
Has anyone used Prague, as a root stock? 

jim VH

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #137 on: May 15, 2020, 11:25:18 AM »
Zitrusgaertner,

That was a good catch.  I hadn't really paid much attention to the petiolesbefore, but this morning I went took a gander at them.  There appears to be a mixture of narrower and wider petioles:




Whether that mixture has always been true, or is just this years fashion statement is indeterminate.  This year, for some reason, most of the leaves fell off; such few older leaves that remain seem to have narrower petioles.  It was a mild winter.

I suspect that the ichandrinlike appearance is a bit of an illusion.  My flying dragon also has relatively wide petioles:



combine that with the fact that  this year the Prague Citsuma has decided to sport long narrow willow-like primary lobes gives it an Ichang-like appearance.

The Prague Citsuma is just plain weird- every year an adventure.  For instance, for many years it had long wicked thorns.  Then last year it apparently decided that thorns were out of style and all new growth was thornless.  This year it appears that thorns are trendy again, along with willowlike leaves.


Millet, I have a rooted cutting than I stuck in the ground to see if survives our long Arctic blasts on it's own roots.  Most citrus don't survive such events on their own roots when the ground freezes solid to a depth of 15 inches after two weeks when the temperature never rises above freezing.  Only Poncirus Trifoliata and its twisted sister Flying Dragon survive without a foot of mulch.   I'll post the outcome after the next Artic Outbreak.  It has easily survived our long wet winters without apparent root rot.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #138 on: May 15, 2020, 09:09:19 PM »
Millet, I have a rooted cutting than I stuck in the ground to see if survives our long Arctic blasts on it's own roots.  Most citrus don't survive such events on their own roots when the ground freezes solid to a depth of 15 inches after two weeks when the temperature never rises above freezing.  Only Poncirus Trifoliata and its twisted sister Flying Dragon survive without a foot of mulch.   I'll post the outcome after the next Artic Outbreak.  It has easily survived our long wet winters without apparent root rot.
Well, jim VH, just a correction but as you know I'm two hours north of you and I've had several relatively small seedlings on their own roots that survived through this winter. (hardy citrus varieties that didn't have poncirus in their ancestry)
I'm thinking perhaps you refer to the colder winters that come along once every several years.
Because obviously I don't think I've ever experienced the ground freezing hard down to 15 inches where I am here.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2020, 09:12:05 PM by SoCal2warm »

jim VH

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Re: Citsuma Prague
« Reply #139 on: May 16, 2020, 11:02:35 AM »
Socal, if you read what I said, I was referring to long arctic blasts, not the warm winters like the past two.  Those long arctic blasts with temperatures of 10-12F or below come along every three to five years.  The last one was January 2017 in the Portland area, an east wind Columbia gorge event when it hit 8F (-13.3C) in Vancouver and the temperature never rose above freezing for a two week period.  Every citrus on own roots  or rootstocks other than PT or FD died in that event, with the exception of a Citrangequat which had the equivalent of a foot of mulch.  The Puget Sound area  was warmer during that event, as I recall

 

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