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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 21498 times)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #175 on: July 02, 2019, 03:32:25 PM »
I see another green bud trying to grow out of the Ten Degree, but none of the other previous buds managed to survive. The plant itself looks like a healthy green color, despite the vissible damage, but still no leaves.

Another cold day today, 61, though it was 82 yesterday.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #176 on: July 06, 2019, 09:11:35 PM »
the very small keraji seedling, recovering from the winter damage and the top accidentally being cut off of it. Less than an inch high but four small leaves on it



will2358

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #177 on: July 11, 2019, 11:54:18 AM »
So that little fellow made it without bring on a root stook. Go Keraji!
My name is Cindy

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #178 on: July 11, 2019, 06:21:22 PM »
So that little fellow made it without bring on a root stook. Go Keraji!
Yes, although it was covered, with a cut out clear plastic water bottle. Though it was a colder Winter than usual here and the covering was buried in snow. The top of the seedling almost completely got killed back, though one little leaf at the very bottom of the stem appeared to survive until April. And I do believe that leaf grew just a tiny little bit bigger. Unfortunatley due to an accident, the seedling got cut back down even lower towards the ground, so it lost that one tiny leaf that had survived through the winter. So what you are seeing now are little tiny leaves that have regrown since the start of July.

Another Keraji seedling that was somewhat bigger did not survive. It was also covered, but planted in a colder spot in the yard that did not get much winter sun (with the low angle of the sun in the winter making that spot more shady).

I know this may be a lot of detail, but all this specific detail is important to be able to infer things about exact level of cold hardiness.

The seedling that survived was maybe 5 inches tall, while the seedling that did not survive was maybe 6 or 7 inches tall.
 The first seedling was killed back by the late February freeze to only 1 inch of live green stem, that was half brown on one side, but still had a tiny green leaf on the other side. Due to an accident, it then got cut down even lower, to maybe three-fourths of an inch.

So what this seems to show is that small Keraji seedlings, on their own roots, will probably not survive here very well, even when given some light cover. But it's probably just on the border of what they are able to survive.

I don't know if these experimental observations may be useful to someone else in another climate.

My limited experiments certainly seemed to suggest that Keraji has a little less cold hardiness than Yuzu.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #179 on: July 11, 2019, 06:34:54 PM »
Here's the little leaflet growth coming out of the Ten Degree tangerine.



I held up a piece of fabric as a background so the tiny green bud could be better seen.

Although this particular branch the bud is growing on is grey, most of the rest of the branches look like a healthy live green color.

So this shows that Ten Degree can technically survive through a cold winter here, although it has really not been doing well.

That tiny leaflet you see in the picture is the only leaf it has right now.

Maybe someone reading this can use these observations to gain some better inference about Ten Degree's level of cold hardiness.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #180 on: July 14, 2019, 04:24:33 PM »
keraji seedling, leaves are a little bigger, putting on new growth



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #181 on: July 18, 2019, 08:33:17 PM »
keraji



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #182 on: July 29, 2019, 03:56:36 PM »
yuzu seedling that is recovering



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #183 on: July 29, 2019, 07:25:09 PM »
The bigger Yuzu has put on a growth spurt


Here's the Bloomsweet

The leaves have greened up a bit, but still don't look like the healthiest dark hue of green.

The Ten Degree still doesn't really have any leaves on it, but is alive. There's a tiny little deformed twisted leaflet that doesn't look very good, and the very beginnings of a leaf bud on another branch. The branches look a healthy green, besides from the streaks of grey from the winter damage, and the dead branches. Several of the little branches are mostly grey, looking dead, but have some green on the outer tips.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #184 on: August 03, 2019, 12:00:35 AM »
little Keraji seedling that is still recovering but growing



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #185 on: August 13, 2019, 10:24:57 PM »
The little Yuzu seedling has recovered to about the same size it was this time last year.



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #186 on: August 25, 2019, 10:19:07 PM »
Here's the yuzu seedling. It's bigger than it was this time last year.


SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #187 on: September 04, 2019, 08:31:01 PM »
The little keraji seedling is beginning to put on some more growth


The yuzu seedling is now 10 inches tall and looks very healthy.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #188 on: September 05, 2019, 06:48:51 PM »
Here's the Yuzu seedling, almost 11 inches tall now, looks very healthy



So far throughout this year it has recovered well from the severe winter damage.

 

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