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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 27078 times)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #200 on: January 13, 2020, 07:40:12 PM »
Here you can see what the Yuzu looks like right now



Seems to be doing decently well. We had some light snow stick on the ground this morning, but it is all gone by now.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #201 on: January 14, 2020, 04:18:47 PM »
Here's the Bloomsweet


You can see a clump of snow piled up on the leaves.

Jan 14

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #202 on: January 24, 2020, 12:47:51 PM »
Here's the little Yuzu seeding

January 24, 2020

Although there was some light snow earlier, the winter so far has been pretty mild. It's almost like an early Spring. The grass is very lush and green, and weeds are growing (albeit slowly since the temperatures are still very cool).

I even saw two rhododendron bushes in bloom at a park, with small pink flowers, just a few days ago.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2020, 12:50:05 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #203 on: January 26, 2020, 04:10:06 PM »
This is an Ichang Lemon (left) and Bloomsweet (right) in containers, left outside. January 26

The leaves are all still dark green on both of them. They are on the deck up near against the house, but only get a narrow window of morning sun since they are on the north side and shaded for much of the day.
I guess both of these can make it through a mild winter.

This is an observation worth taking into account because I would consider Ichang Lemon and Bloomsweet to be only marginally hardy cold-hardy varieties.

I also left out a MIC in a container right next to them (not shown in picture) and it does not look as well, yellow leaves. Assuming what was actually sold to me were indeed MIC hybrids, it would appear MIC is not really very hardy.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #204 on: January 26, 2020, 04:15:04 PM »
The tiny little Keraji seedling is still alive in-ground.


picture taken January 26, 2020

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #205 on: February 13, 2020, 06:13:38 PM »
Here's the tiny keraji seedling again

February 13, 2020

It's looking good.
it wasn't protected.

I noticed a camellia bush in partial bloom in a neighborhood on the way through Tacoma, also saw a pink rhododendron bush in full bloom near a big apartment building in a semi-protected spot. I even saw a few flowers of something that looked like jasmine, although most of the bush had brown dead leaves. So far it's been a cold but "green" winter (meaning the temperatures haven't really dropped too low).

Here's the Ichang papeda I just planted several months ago:

pretty small size, rooted from cuttings

As you can see, it also has its leaves, still green.

Pretty much almost all the hardy citrus is looking good at this point.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #206 on: February 14, 2020, 01:15:45 PM »
here's the yuzu seedling, February 14, it looks like it's doing very well


SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #207 on: February 16, 2020, 01:58:17 PM »
Here's the Bloomsweet grapefruit. It isn't looking too bad, leaves still green.

February 16

kumin

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #208 on: February 16, 2020, 03:02:35 PM »
If the Acrtic air continues to descend into Eurasia for another 6 weeks, there may be a lot of unharmed North American Citrus this winter. No guarantees that will be the case, though.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 05:43:25 PM by kumin »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #209 on: February 16, 2020, 03:45:33 PM »
I noticed this morning my purple crocus blooming from bulbs, nearly in full bloom. I know crocus typically blooms early, but February 16 seems a little early, for this climate. There has not really been any bout of warm temperatures so far this February.

I saw another big rhododendron bush in the neighborhood in full bloom, with pink flowers. Most remarkable it seems to be in mostly shade.

The Madake bamboo has very healthy colored green leaves. I mean the leaves have been behaving like an evergreen.
It looks much better than bamboo (presumably Madake) I've seen in zone 9b Japan in early April, which had leaves that looked yellow brown and mostly dead and spent.

The small cork oak seedling has deep green healthy colored leaves, which it has retained from last year. It has behaved as a broadleaf evergreen as well. (I suppose that shouldn't be surprising because it retained its leaves even during the cold last winter, and the leaves remained green, but they look even a slightly healthier shade of green this year).

The cherry tree (ornamental flowering Yoshino) is also beginning to bud out, there's some obvious green on the swelling bud growth.

It's hard to say whether all of this is typical for this area. It's a kind of weird climate here, in many ways. I mean it's cold and far north, but many things do not behave like you would expect for a cold and far north area, it's also a mild cold. Even when it has intensely snowed in the past, the temperature is usually only just slightly below the freezing point.
I'm surprised so many of the plants seem to be waking up so early, when we haven't had any unusual warm spell. It's almost like an early Spring.

Also wanted to mention the rosemary was in bloom with light lavender color flowers in the middle of January, and the temperatures had never got that warm. I read they struggle to even be able to grow rosemary at mid-latitudes on the East Coast.
It hasn't gotten warm this winter, it just hasn't gotten extremely cold.

I even thought about taking pictures because I thought maybe no one would believe me.

I'm also noticing some leaf growth beginning on the rose bushes.
It's not that warm, unless you would consider the 40s (F) to be warm. Maybe one or two days this week had a high of 50 degrees.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2020, 03:55:33 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #210 on: February 17, 2020, 12:52:25 PM »
The weather forecast predicts it could get down to 27 F tomorrow night to early Wednesday morning. I guess that will be the low point of this week.
That's colder than what it's been, but pretty mild by historical averages of what the low points have been in the past.

Right now 37 at 10:00 in the morning, with a high today expected to get up to 48.


The thing about the weather in the PNW (not too far away from the coast) is it's a lot more stable than places in the East that are at lower latitudes, the temperatures do not fluctuate as widely.
The winters in the PNW are also very wet, so I am never worried about plants getting dried out by cold winter winds, like they worry about in other parts of the country. If anything, the worry is about adequate root drainage, since cold wet waterlogged soil could promote root rot.

There are also rarely any of what you could really call "cold snaps" in the PNW, since winter temperatures rarely rise high enough for plants to really begin exiting out of dormancy in the first place, and temperatures typically do not really begin consistently rising until late in the year.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2020, 01:02:01 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #211 on: February 21, 2020, 12:59:00 PM »
There's some frost on the ground this morning.

Yuzu


Sudachi


Changsha


tiny Keraji seedling


Ichangquat seedling


pictures taken Feb 21

It might just be me, but the leaves of most of the plants seem to be a slightly less healthy green looking color than they were a few days ago when we started getting some colder nights. (Even though the low points only went down to maybe 27, maybe as low as 24, depending on which official weather source you look at)

I guess even moderately low temperatures in the low 20s (F) can cause some moderate leaf damage if they hit late-February.
This is probably about the closest this area gets to a "late cold snap".

The leaves on the Ichang lemon in a container near the house (but left outside) look okay. I think it might be a little bit of a warmer spot since it's near the house which gives off heat at night. Glad to see the Ichang lemon seems to be handling temperatures better than it seemed to last year.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2020, 04:36:27 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #212 on: February 23, 2020, 04:35:20 PM »
Some light sort of rain/ice hail is falling, even though it's only ‎46F, just to give you some idea what the whether has been like. 1:30 pm in the middle of the day, February 23.

Just tiny pieces of hail, they don't last on the ground more than a few seconds before melting. I just heard the sound of the fine ice particles hitting the window.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2020, 04:38:54 PM by SoCal2warm »

 

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