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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 35523 times)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #225 on: May 21, 2020, 08:17:48 PM »
Yuzu seedling, growing on own roots


growing very well now, lots of darker new leaves, and the old leaves look fairly healthy too.

May 21

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #226 on: May 28, 2020, 09:17:23 PM »
The new leaves on the Bloomsweet are really putting on some growth.



The Yuzu, Changsha, and Dunstan citrumelo are really taking off.
It's 81 degrees (F) right now and humid, feels like a jungle.

Florian

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #227 on: May 29, 2020, 04:46:21 AM »
Do any of the coldhardy citrus reliably ripen for you? Where I live, the absolute low isn't even that much of a problem but many varieties are just too late and then frost can take the fruit.

kumin

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #228 on: May 29, 2020, 07:11:22 AM »
Getting fruit to ripen is an additional hurdle to clear toward the goal developing edible cold-hardy Citrus. Developing acid cultivars should be considerably easier than sweet ones. In northern regions Summers are often either too cool, or too short to accumulate adequate sugars.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #229 on: May 29, 2020, 02:14:05 PM »
Getting fruit to ripen is an additional hurdle to clear toward the goal developing edible cold-hardy Citrus. Developing acid cultivars should be considerably easier than sweet ones. In northern regions Summers are often either too cool, or too short to accumulate adequate sugars.
Well, the length of summer heat is certainly shorter than it is in other parts of the country, with the temperature being cool to cold throughout much of the year, but there certainly is plenty of heat here during the height of Summer. I feel like there are some unique factors going both for and against, in this climate.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #230 on: June 04, 2020, 08:13:53 PM »
Little Ichang papeda seedling putting out some new leaf growth, darker reddish color



seedling is only five inches high, growing on own roots, not grafted, survived in the ground through the winter

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #231 on: June 07, 2020, 04:12:42 PM »
Bloomsweet


The new leaves of the Bloomsweet have grown much bigger now, and there appears to be a new rapidly growing branch offshoot at the top.

Yuzu


Dunstan citrumelo


Both the Yuzu and Citrumelo are really taking off, lots of growth. They will probably get to be a very large bush size very soon.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #232 on: June 17, 2020, 05:53:46 PM »
Ichang papeda seedling


June 17, 2020

The darker reddish leaves are the new growth the seedling has put out so far this year.
This little seedling is growing in the ground, outside, survived the winter here unprotected.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #233 on: June 27, 2020, 02:34:31 PM »
Bloomsweet


The Bloomsweet is putting on some decent growth now, some big healthy looking leaves, and it seems to be recovering well.

small Ichang papeda seedling, the dark reddish new leaves have now turned green


Here's the small Yuzu seedling (on its own roots)



Changsha mandarin (on grafted rootstock, picture not shown) also is doing very well. planted in a sort of protected spot on south-facing side of house.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2020, 02:41:49 PM by SoCal2warm »

 

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