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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 45606 times)

Balance

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #250 on: October 04, 2020, 11:15:58 PM »
That is indeed quite interesting, I'll likely give the tree a few more years so it has some girth to it before I attempt to plant outside. On a whim I had sprouted some seeds from a lemon wedge some years back and planted these outdoors  while still quite small a while back and didn't protect them over the winter. They had significant die back but all recovered, my thoughts are that if a lemon can survive our winters, then surely the satsuma should as well, as it's supposed to more cold hardy.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #251 on: October 05, 2020, 12:46:51 AM »
On a whim I had sprouted some seeds from a lemon wedge some years back and planted these outdoors  while still quite small a while back and didn't protect them over the winter. They had significant die back but all recovered, my thoughts are that if a lemon can survive our winters, then surely the satsuma should as well, as it's supposed to more cold hardy.
I am thinking that may have been a more mild winter. From my experience here, it seems that these seedlings may be able to survive a more mild winter, but not the colder winters that come every so often.
(Yuzu seedlings might be able to permanently survive, it seems, though they might be killed back to the ground in a very cold winter if not planted in an optimal spot)

Everett is quite a bit north from Olympia. Maybe technically same climate zone, but an even shorter growing season and cooler temperatures.

Balance

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #252 on: October 05, 2020, 03:39:56 AM »
Quite possible it was just a lighter winter, I wasn't as serious about citrus growing back then so didn't really mind how the trees faired. I've been looking into Yuzu a good deal recently and have been hoping to get seeds, would love to try growing them directly in ground with shelter for their first few years with hopes of leaving them uncovered as they mature.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #253 on: October 06, 2020, 11:52:19 PM »
I just went to the Hoyt Arboretum, in Portland, and saw the Ichang papeda tree there. It's up growing against the wall of the visitor center.

They also had a Wollemi pine plant that I noticed. Getting off-topic for a moment, the Wollemi pine looked like some of the top had died back, perhaps due to the previous winter, but overall it looked like it was surviving and doing okay. It didn't look like it was ever covered, and it was at least 15 feet away from the building.

Back to the Ichang papeda, the tree is about 6 feet tall, and there was a fair amount of fruit on it. Maybe 40 percent of the fruit looked like it had dropped. Half of the fruit looked like a ripe yellow, or very close to being ripe, but the fruit size was pretty small. Maybe not much bigger than poncirus. So maybe in this climate the fruit does not have time to grow to its maximum size, or maybe it is still too early in the year (October 6).

The tree itself looks like it is doing well. I could not see any signs of the base of the tree being grafted on to anything, although I cannot be entirely sure. So it might be own-root. The leaves looked a healthy color.

The fruits smell similar to lemon, but deeper smelling, maybe almost a little bit resinous woody smelling (entirely in a good way). It's a beautiful fragrance, at least in my personal opinion.
Something about the fragrance smells just a little "off", in a way that sort of reminds me of kaffir lime. Maybe even almost the slightest bit "skunky" (but I would not say in a bad way).
The fragrance is very similar, in a way, to Yuzu, except without the sour orange type of fragrance and without the "spiciness".


I am thinking the visitor center is probably unheated during the winter, when the visitor center building is closed. But the wall would still provide a wind break.
The location of the Arboretum is within the city, but on a mostly forested little mountain ridge inside it, and it is at the top of the mountain but there are numerous trees everywhere, and lots of bushes closer by, so it is not "out in the open". Probably being higher up, it is not as subject to the colder air that can flow down through the valley sometimes in the winter.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #254 on: October 18, 2020, 06:50:47 PM »
Today I noticed my (in-ground) Sudachi has a tiny little fruit bud on it. The plant is still relatively small. Strange because I never noticed a flower on it.
The fruit will probably not have time to develop because it is so late into the season, but still I think this is a promising sign.

October 18, 2020

Nextah

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #255 on: October 28, 2020, 09:56:04 PM »
Speaking of the Wollemi Pine, I've had one planted for about 5 or 6 years.  I'm out in SE Portland in the Milwaukie area.  I'll measure it one of these days.  I'm thinking it is in the 12-15 ft. range.  When it was smaller and got cold, I did throw a bit of a frost blanket over it.  This year, it grew female pine cones for the first time, so I'm going to try to collect the seeds. 

Besides the Wollemi Pine, I also have an in-ground Arctic Frost that is close to fruiting.  I throw a frost blanket over it if it is looking like it is going to hit 25 or lower.  I also have a Washington Navel Orange tree planted in ground, but I have an air pipe running from my basement outside so that if it hits a certain temperature, a fan will kick in and make sure it doesn't freeze.  I have my first Orange fruit on the tree now and I'm just seeing if it will ripen.  I have my doubts that I can ripen the Orange properly though.  I'll see if I can get some pictures posted.  One thing that I can confirm is that an Orange tree will do totally fine being under a frost blanket for 4 or 5 months.

Nextah

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #256 on: October 29, 2020, 07:20:34 PM »
Here are two images of the Arctic Frost Satsuma and my Wollemi Pine Tree that I referred to in my prior post.  Both located near Portland.





Note that the hedge is about 9 feet tall for size comparison.



SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #257 on: October 31, 2020, 01:49:54 AM »
Here are two images of the Arctic Frost Satsuma ...  located near Portland.
How long has your Arctic Frost been in the ground? Have you covered or protected it?

Do you know if your Arctic Frost is grafted or if it is on its own roots?

Nextah

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #258 on: October 31, 2020, 01:00:25 PM »
My Arctic Frost is on its rootstock, I'm pretty sure.  I have a number of grafted citrus in pots and they are all grafted.  I purchased it online from a nursery down in Texas and ordered the biggest size they had.  It has been in the ground for about 3 years.  One year, around 2 years ago, it had some bark damage due to the cold on a lateral branch, but it wasn't totally damaged just partially, and the following year it bloomed and fruited heavily, but just on that branch.  The fruit was a bit on the small size and so-so tasting, but it did fully ripen.  I'm hoping that the fruit quality was due to the bark damage.

I've generally covered it during the winter with frost fabric.  Last winter was pretty warm, so I think it was only covered for just a couple of weeks.  If it looks like it might hit 25-26, I'll throw the frost blanket on, if it looks like it will get colder than that, I'll bring over a garbage can, fill it up with water and drop an aquarium heater (75w I believe) in there.  Usually, that is just for a night or two.  I have found that the key with doing that is to make sure the lid is still on there fairly secure, otherwise it will evaporate out.  Also, I've gone away from using structures.  I just throw the frost blank over the top and use snake sand bags around the perimeter to provide a good seal. 

So, I can't really say if the Arctic Frost is especially cold hardy or not or as compared to others.  It has held up in wet winters though. 


Millet

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #259 on: October 31, 2020, 02:16:10 PM »
Artic Frost survived temperatures as low as 9 degrees at the Texas A&M Research and Extension Center.  Generally, cold hardy citrus also produce fruit of lesser quality.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #260 on: October 31, 2020, 04:56:56 PM »


Yuzu seedling, October 31, 2020, Olympia, WA
2 and a half feet tall now

it looks like it's continued to slowly put on some more growth despite the cooling temperatures.

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #261 on: November 02, 2020, 04:34:26 PM »
The Bloomsweet appears to have a new branch of growth


still appears to be doing well


Here's the new Keraji Jim_VH grafted for me

Has not gone through a winter yet.


This is the tiny Keraji seedling in-ground, on its own roots, that has not really done the best. It's leaves have turned more yellow now.


It's still alive and will probably survive another year, but I was disappointed that it barely put on much growth this year. I wonder how long it will take for it to grow big enough that it might start showing some more vigorous growth. It is obviously still very small and does not have much energy. I don't think it has fully recovered from the winter 2 years ago.

November 2

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #262 on: November 02, 2020, 04:54:05 PM »
Here's the tiny fruit bud on the Sudachi

I can already see it's most likely going to drop off.
The plant is too small and doesn't have enough energy, and it's too late in the season, temperatures are getting cold.

Here's the Ichangquat seedling, if you can manage to see it through the bamboo leaves

still definitely alive, though not the healthiest looking color.
I don't think it managed to grow any new leaves this year. But the leaves from before the previous winter still seem to be alive, having some hue of green despite being yellowish. I don't know if the leaves are functional.

Although it does not look too much worse than the leaves on the Ichang papeda plants.
Here's one of the Ichang papeda plants. The leaves on the other one look exactly the same. slight green hue still but mostly has already turned yellowish and pale. had been like this for more than two months.


What I mean is it suggests this Ichangquat seedling may not be particularly vulnerable, if the leaves of Ichang papeda itself in the same situation look the same.

I have no idea why the leaves of Ichang papeda look much worse than the Yuzu right now.

pictures taken November 2, 2020
« Last Edit: November 02, 2020, 04:59:19 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #263 on: November 03, 2020, 09:10:28 PM »
Here's a picture of the Ichang papeda in the Hoyt Arboretum in Portland

The tree is huge, it appears to be 10 feet tall now, definitely at least 9.
The yellow fruits appear to be about 1.25 inches in diameter now, and are moderately fragrant in the rain.

picture taken November 3, 2020

You can't see it in the picture but there are a few spikes on the main trunk that look big enough to kill a person. The biggest main branches and trunks have few spikes but the spikes that are there are very big.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #264 on: November 03, 2020, 11:00:48 PM »
my Wollemi Pine Tree



Note that the hedge is about 9 feet tall for size comparison.
I got to see your Wollemi Pine Tree today in person and touched it. I can tell everyone the tree is 14 feet high.
That hedge in the background is indeed 9 feet high.
That tree is probably a contender for the tallest specimen of Wollemi Pine in America, although I'm not really knowledgeable about this.
(the location is actually right outside of Portland, in Milwaukie, OR. I'll just say it is only about a quarter mile away from the Kairos-Milwaukie Church)


I did take pictures of the Wollemi Pine in the Hoyt Arboretum. That one is only about 6 feet tall.


If any of you do research into what the Wollemi Pine actually is, you'll see why it's so rare and special, and interesting from a botanical and academic perspective.
I don't think it's particularly cold tolerant.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2020, 11:04:09 PM by SoCal2warm »

Nextah

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #265 on: November 04, 2020, 10:28:35 PM »
There is a Wollemi Pine specimen at the the Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California that is bigger than mine by a fair amount, but perhaps I have the biggest one in Oregon, but I have no idea either.  I think mine looks healthier though as compared to the one in San Marino.  As far as cold tolerance, I've read online that it is 10-14 degrees or 8b/9a.   

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #266 on: January 05, 2021, 02:25:49 PM »
January 4, 2021
I saw several Oregon Grape (Mahonia aquifolium) in bloom with big stalks of yellow flowers. (Not all the plants were in bloom, maybe 30 percent of them) I also saw two different varieties of camellia bush in bloom.
Point Defiance Park, Tacoma

December 13, I saw hardy fuchsia bushes in bloom, they seemed to be in the middle of blooming because there were several buds that looked like they were getting ready to open. Was surprised to see fuchsia bushes blooming so late into the year. Also saw a camellia bush in medium abundant bloom in a yard in a nearby home. And a large rhododendron bush with just a few sparse pink flowers on it.
Seward Park, Seattle

I guess it can't really be so cold here at this time of year if there are some things blooming.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2021, 02:36:33 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #267 on: January 05, 2021, 05:07:56 PM »
Yuzu seedling

January 5, 2021

The leaves are turning a little more of a yellowish hue of green due to the cold, but still green.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #268 on: January 10, 2021, 03:36:18 PM »


very small Keraji seedling

It looks like it may be able to survive, if it has enough energy to be able to put out a flush of growth next year.
It seems to have several very little stalks, which are still green.

Ichangquat seedling

It has not done so well, but the several small trunks rising up still appear moderately green. I think this will probably manage to survive into next year, but I am not sure if it will be able to grow out new leaves. The leaves it does have look like a fairly pale yellowish hue of green, I doubt those leaves are functional.

This is another Ichangquat seedling, which I suspected may be an Ichangquat x citrumelo (or possibly some other trifoliate hybrid) complex hybrid.

It seems to be doing much better than the first Ichangquat seedling. very dark green healthy looking leaves.
It was actually planted out in January last year, seemed to do well at first but then defoliated and suffered some branch die-back, but as you can now see in this picture it has fully recovered.
Looks promising, like it will do very well. It's about 18 inches (45 cm) high. seedling growing on own roots


This is the Bloomsweet

still looking okay, not bad, the leaves still look a pretty good hue of green, although not quite as much as a healthy shade of green as it looked earlier in the year.
The other one in the background is a Keraji, which was only just planted in October.


all pictures taken January 10, 2021

 

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