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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 42382 times)

Balance

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #250 on: October 04, 2020, 11:15:58 PM »
That is indeed quite interesting, I'll likely give the tree a few more years so it has some girth to it before I attempt to plant outside. On a whim I had sprouted some seeds from a lemon wedge some years back and planted these outdoors  while still quite small a while back and didn't protect them over the winter. They had significant die back but all recovered, my thoughts are that if a lemon can survive our winters, then surely the satsuma should as well, as it's supposed to more cold hardy.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #251 on: October 05, 2020, 12:46:51 AM »
On a whim I had sprouted some seeds from a lemon wedge some years back and planted these outdoors  while still quite small a while back and didn't protect them over the winter. They had significant die back but all recovered, my thoughts are that if a lemon can survive our winters, then surely the satsuma should as well, as it's supposed to more cold hardy.
I am thinking that may have been a more mild winter. From my experience here, it seems that these seedlings may be able to survive a more mild winter, but not the colder winters that come every so often.
(Yuzu seedlings might be able to permanently survive, it seems, though they might be killed back to the ground in a very cold winter if not planted in an optimal spot)

Everett is quite a bit north from Olympia. Maybe technically same climate zone, but an even shorter growing season and cooler temperatures.

Balance

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #252 on: October 05, 2020, 03:39:56 AM »
Quite possible it was just a lighter winter, I wasn't as serious about citrus growing back then so didn't really mind how the trees faired. I've been looking into Yuzu a good deal recently and have been hoping to get seeds, would love to try growing them directly in ground with shelter for their first few years with hopes of leaving them uncovered as they mature.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #253 on: October 06, 2020, 11:52:19 PM »
I just went to the Hoyt Arboretum, in Portland, and saw the Ichang papeda tree there. It's up growing against the wall of the visitor center.

They also had a Wollemi pine plant that I noticed. Getting off-topic for a moment, the Wollemi pine looked like some of the top had died back, perhaps due to the previous winter, but overall it looked like it was surviving and doing okay. It didn't look like it was ever covered, and it was at least 15 feet away from the building.

Back to the Ichang papeda, the tree is about 6 feet tall, and there was a fair amount of fruit on it. Maybe 40 percent of the fruit looked like it had dropped. Half of the fruit looked like a ripe yellow, or very close to being ripe, but the fruit size was pretty small. Maybe not much bigger than poncirus. So maybe in this climate the fruit does not have time to grow to its maximum size, or maybe it is still too early in the year (October 6).

The tree itself looks like it is doing well. I could not see any signs of the base of the tree being grafted on to anything, although I cannot be entirely sure. So it might be own-root. The leaves looked a healthy color.

The fruits smell similar to lemon, but deeper smelling, maybe almost a little bit resinous woody smelling (entirely in a good way). It's a beautiful fragrance, at least in my personal opinion.
Something about the fragrance smells just a little "off", in a way that sort of reminds me of kaffir lime. Maybe even almost the slightest bit "skunky" (but I would not say in a bad way).
The fragrance is very similar, in a way, to Yuzu, except without the sour orange type of fragrance and without the "spiciness".


I am thinking the visitor center is probably unheated during the winter, when the visitor center building is closed. But the wall would still provide a wind break.
The location of the Arboretum is within the city, but on a mostly forested little mountain ridge inside it, and it is at the top of the mountain but there are numerous trees everywhere, and lots of bushes closer by, so it is not "out in the open". Probably being higher up, it is not as subject to the colder air that can flow down through the valley sometimes in the winter.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #254 on: October 18, 2020, 06:50:47 PM »
Today I noticed my (in-ground) Sudachi has a tiny little fruit bud on it. The plant is still relatively small. Strange because I never noticed a flower on it.
The fruit will probably not have time to develop because it is so late into the season, but still I think this is a promising sign.

October 18, 2020

 

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