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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 13766 times)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #75 on: February 10, 2019, 01:25:34 AM »
The forecast is still on for it to hit 12 degrees at about 6:30 am in the morning.
It's still 27 degrees right now at 10:20 pm. I'm going to go out there with some hot water containers very early in a couple of hours.

Looks like this will be the only really low point this week, according to the forecast.

The good news is the snow is deep enough to mostly cover the small plants, which should provide some degree of insulation as the temperature suddenly dips.

There wasn't snow on the ground at all in December or January.

Update: 1:00 am, 20 degrees, just checked on the gallon water containers outside and they are still liquid, cold but not even any ice in them. They were on the ground under the covering, insulated by a thick layer of snow. Going to warm them up right now.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 04:00:16 AM by SoCal2warm »

TooFarNorth

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #76 on: February 10, 2019, 07:06:41 AM »
Good luck with your trees.  Hopefully the snow will provide a lot of protection for them and the hot water also.  Thankfully, this winter, so far we have only had to deal with the mid 20's.  Best of luck.

TFN

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #77 on: February 10, 2019, 03:49:54 PM »
When I went out there last night I noticed the smaller uncovered plants were all bent down into the snow. Apparently the snow kept accumulating on the leaves and stuck there and froze, weighing the plant down. I hope this didn't permanently bend or break any branches. The leaves on the citrumelo and ten degree, which were weighed down in ice do not look very good, Yuzu doesn't look too terrible, but that's probably because it was more bushy and the snow just formed a ball around it.
I don't know how low the temperature actually dropped in the yard, but I measured 24 įF right outside the doorstep at 3:00 (very early morning).

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #78 on: February 10, 2019, 05:50:28 PM »
Newspaper article:
Quote
The South Sound is digging out from the biggest snowstorm in a decade Saturday morning. Now, itís going to get cold.
The mercury is predicted to drop to 17 degrees on Sunday in Olympia, according to the National Weather Service.
At least 10 inches of snow fell overnight in Olympia, according to the Weather Service.

A winter storm warning is in effect through Saturday afternoon in Puget Sound. Winds are forecast to reach 16 miles per hour Saturday with gusts as high as 28 miles per hour in central Thurston County.

Puget Sound Energy was reporting more than 400 customers without power as of 3 p.m. on Saturday.

Mother Nature will not be cooperating in snow removal. Temperatures will stay below freezing all weekend, the Weather Service said Saturday.

If snow should melt during the day, it will undoubtedly turn to ice over night. Temperatures are forecast to get just a handful of degrees above freezing all week. Friday should be the warmest day of the week with a high of 39 degrees.
After Sundayís dip into the teens, lows will be will be in the 20s all week.
Interstate 90 over Snoqualmie Pass is open to vehicles with traction tires or chains.
However, I-90 was closed in both directions from six miles east of Ellensburg to Vantage as of 6:30 a.m. Saturday. Tractor-trailer spin-outs are blocking the roadway and drifting snow is causing poor visibility. WSDOT could not provide an estimated time to reopen the highway.

Flights into and out of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport are affected by the storm. Alaska Airlines is allowing passengers to change their travel plans through Sunday. Passengers should check with individual airlines for the latest flight information.

Officials from nearly every public safety agency are warning about the dangers of the current weather. Deep snow, slick roads, winds and extreme cold can make for a deadly combination. They urge citizens to travel only if necessary.

The low temperatures also make for dangerous conditions for the regionís homeless population as well as anyone who might lose power during the prolonged cold period.

Heavy snow is weighing down tree limbs which can snap off without warning. Trees have been falling during the night around the region.

https://www.theolympian.com/latest-news/article226039915.html#storylink=cpy

kumin

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #79 on: February 10, 2019, 05:56:03 PM »
Thanks for the post. Providing the weight of the snow doesn't cause damage, snow per se.is usually protective against low air temperatures. Growth above snow on the other hand can be very vulnerable, depending on atmospheric conditions. This event should be informative, after there's a chance to evaluate the outcome and subsequent recovery. Wind is a mixed bag, it contributes to desiccation on one hand, but also contributes to temperature uniformity helping to prevent super-cold air accumulation in low lying areas.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #80 on: February 11, 2019, 05:16:24 PM »
It's essentially a snowstorm. About 13 or 14 inches piled up so far. Difficult for anyone to go anywhere. There hasn't been this much snow in a decade. Like a ski resort. The temperatures aren't really that extremely low though and the forecast says the lowest it will dip down to in the next ten days is 24, but mostly the nights will be in the low 30s.

I'm going to build a big snowman.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #81 on: February 16, 2019, 05:33:11 PM »
Here's a picture of the Yuzu. It was completely covered in snow, but the temperatures did not go too low. The layer of snow on the ground was 16 inches deep at one point, but it has now been rapidly melting, in part because there has been some light drizzling of rain. It still has its leaves and doesn't look too terrible.


« Last Edit: February 16, 2019, 05:34:47 PM by SoCal2warm »

 

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