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Author Topic: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest  (Read 37943 times)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #225 on: May 21, 2020, 08:17:48 PM »
Yuzu seedling, growing on own roots


growing very well now, lots of darker new leaves, and the old leaves look fairly healthy too.

May 21

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #226 on: May 28, 2020, 09:17:23 PM »
The new leaves on the Bloomsweet are really putting on some growth.



The Yuzu, Changsha, and Dunstan citrumelo are really taking off.
It's 81 degrees (F) right now and humid, feels like a jungle.

Florian

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #227 on: May 29, 2020, 04:46:21 AM »
Do any of the coldhardy citrus reliably ripen for you? Where I live, the absolute low isn't even that much of a problem but many varieties are just too late and then frost can take the fruit.

kumin

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #228 on: May 29, 2020, 07:11:22 AM »
Getting fruit to ripen is an additional hurdle to clear toward the goal developing edible cold-hardy Citrus. Developing acid cultivars should be considerably easier than sweet ones. In northern regions Summers are often either too cool, or too short to accumulate adequate sugars.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #229 on: May 29, 2020, 02:14:05 PM »
Getting fruit to ripen is an additional hurdle to clear toward the goal developing edible cold-hardy Citrus. Developing acid cultivars should be considerably easier than sweet ones. In northern regions Summers are often either too cool, or too short to accumulate adequate sugars.
Well, the length of summer heat is certainly shorter than it is in other parts of the country, with the temperature being cool to cold throughout much of the year, but there certainly is plenty of heat here during the height of Summer. I feel like there are some unique factors going both for and against, in this climate.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #230 on: June 04, 2020, 08:13:53 PM »
Little Ichang papeda seedling putting out some new leaf growth, darker reddish color



seedling is only five inches high, growing on own roots, not grafted, survived in the ground through the winter

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #231 on: June 07, 2020, 04:12:42 PM »
Bloomsweet


The new leaves of the Bloomsweet have grown much bigger now, and there appears to be a new rapidly growing branch offshoot at the top.

Yuzu


Dunstan citrumelo


Both the Yuzu and Citrumelo are really taking off, lots of growth. They will probably get to be a very large bush size very soon.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #232 on: June 17, 2020, 05:53:46 PM »
Ichang papeda seedling


June 17, 2020

The darker reddish leaves are the new growth the seedling has put out so far this year.
This little seedling is growing in the ground, outside, survived the winter here unprotected.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #233 on: June 27, 2020, 02:34:31 PM »
Bloomsweet


The Bloomsweet is putting on some decent growth now, some big healthy looking leaves, and it seems to be recovering well.

small Ichang papeda seedling, the dark reddish new leaves have now turned green


Here's the small Yuzu seedling (on its own roots)



Changsha mandarin (on grafted rootstock, picture not shown) also is doing very well. planted in a sort of protected spot on south-facing side of house.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2020, 02:41:49 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #234 on: July 21, 2020, 02:39:52 PM »
Amazing, my Ten Degree Tangerine is finally beginning to put out some leaf growth, after last year not being able to put out any leaves (after the damage from the very cold winter).
I see a small little leaf beginning to grow on it, a real leaf, not just a green bud trying to leaf. There are about four little leaflets all together in a little bunch, just a little over half an inch long (1.5 cm). It really looks like these will be able to grow out this year.

July 21

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #235 on: July 21, 2020, 04:59:43 PM »
here's the Yuzu seedling, in ground

July 21

so far it has made it through two winters (well, actually two and a half sort of)

Millet

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #236 on: July 21, 2020, 09:53:17 PM »
Your Yuzu look like it is coming along just fine.  A well balanced tree.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #237 on: July 22, 2020, 05:10:15 PM »
tiny Keraji seedling just beginning to put on new growth



This is the Ichangquat seedling. It hasn't really done much. The leaves from last year are still alive but do not really look the healthiest and are not a deep hue of green. It has not grown any new leaves so far this year, nor is there any sign of new green buds.

The leaves are green, more green than any other color, but a little bit pale and yellowish, though they have been recovering their green color hue over the past several months.


Here's a close up of some small new leaf growth coming out of the Ichangquat seedling that presumably had been pollinated by a citrumelo:

This had been growing inside, and then I planted it outside during late January. Some of the side branches died back and it defoliated, but it now seems to be starting to regrow.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #238 on: July 23, 2020, 04:03:26 PM »
This has been an unusual summer. We haven't had many hot days so far, in June or July. (writing this as of July 23)
It's 62 F right now, 1:00 in the middle of the day. Yesterday I had a wool sweater on.
The first half of June was downright cold, with a few days where the temperature didn't even get above 59 F.

This is probably not giving the citrus as much chance to put on growth.

mrtexas

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #239 on: July 26, 2020, 01:58:18 PM »
Citrus won't grow with nights 55F or lower at least where I live near Houston

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #240 on: July 26, 2020, 05:35:06 PM »
Citrus won't grow with nights 55F or lower at least where I live near Houston
Well, you have to remember these are hardy varieties of citrus.

Nighttime low temperatures for the month of July have ranged between about 46 and 54, with two nights going down to 44.

I took the data for the nighttime lows for the first 15 days in the month of July, and got an average of 50.


Maybe citrus where you are do not deal with the widely fluctuating temperatures as well, since daytime temperatures in Texas (where you are) can get very hot.



By the way, it has just begun to finally warm up. Clear sunny days. Temperature right now at 2:30 in the middle of the day is 83 F.

I'm seeing some obvious growth on the tiny Keraji seedling now. Still no growth on the Ichangquat, but the leaves from last year appear to be greening up more, and I would guess they are functional.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2020, 05:40:35 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #241 on: July 27, 2020, 05:17:10 PM »
here's the leaf growth coming out of one spot on one of the little side branches of the Ten Degree Tangerine.


Again, it wasn't able to successfully put out any leaf growth last year, although it tried, so this is a good sign.

(Ten Degree is a cross between Clementine and Yuzu, for any of you who did not know)

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #242 on: July 27, 2020, 05:35:50 PM »
Yuzu bush on grafted rootstock, doing very well


Bloomsweet, big healthy looking leaves

It's still not that big, needs more time to get established

Dunstan citrumelo

Doing pretty good, moderately vigorous

July 27, 2020


No fruits from these plants yet, they need to get bigger first

keeping them well watered, that's the secret to getting them to put on growth in the summer here, since conditions are now getting hot and dry

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #243 on: August 11, 2020, 12:01:32 PM »
here's the tiny keraji seedling, it's put on some noticeable growth over the last week, although still nothing impressive:


The Ichangquat still hasn't really done anything, still has its leaves from last year, but no new leaves. The leaves are green but not the healthiest color, still somewhat of a pale yellowish green:


The Ichang papeda (this one growing on own roots), leaves do not look the healthiest dark green color as well


But the other ichangquat seedling (picture not shown in this thread), that was presumably pollinated by a citrumelo, it has been growing out new leaf growth that is a dark green healthy color. Perhaps its leaves look healthier because they grew out later into the year, when temperatures have stayed consistently warmer.

August 11, 2020
« Last Edit: August 11, 2020, 12:05:50 PM by SoCal2warm »

SoCal2warm

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Re: Citrus in the Pacific Northwest
« Reply #244 on: August 11, 2020, 12:14:18 PM »
I also have numerous Yuzu (both seedlings and ones grafted onto rootstock). They have all done very well. Even two of the ones that were grafted onto rootstock and left in containers outside during the cold (2018-2019) winter. After the winter, they did not look good, and I thought they might not survive, and would just decline until they finally died, but I planted them in the ground, and they both are putting out healthy leaf growth now. They seem to be on track to fully recover. Yuzu seems to be a vigorous growing variety and can easily recover here.

I would say that Yuzu is the best performing variety here (with only the possible exception of the Dunstan citrumelo).

 

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