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Author Topic: Persea mites  (Read 2804 times)

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #25 on: June 26, 2017, 11:40:46 AM »
The guys in zone 23 and 24 would be having better conditions for these mites to thrive it seems.  My place is on the edge of where they can survive.  Something I read said 20 miles inland or firther and they just get cooked conpletely.  We are about 16 miles inland but its in a really dry exposed area. 

Again, mites thrive under hot and dry conditions.  Trust me Spaugh, you let this paradigm of "borderline" climes dictate how and when you treat is gonna be the death blow to your trees.  They are being weakened as you watch.   Get the bastards now!  There will be plenty of eggs to go around in those leaves to let drop.  I can vouch for Forbid 4F.  Expensive as hell but it IS the silver bullet.  Translaminar, no way for the pests to build up an immunity, nails every cycle/stage of every mite family known.  Safety issue - I've used it on my citrus and our family is still standing.    :D  (It will continue to be expensive until it goes generic).

Here's all the info you need.  https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef438

And.....don't you guys have farm agents and local entomologists you can call on for pest control?

Im sure there are professionals that I could call.  But this is just a home garden with 24 avocado trees.  You have motivated me enough to go ahead and do something.  The forbid stuff is really spendy at 28$ an ounce.  How many trees can I treat with 1oz of forbid 4f? 

I have sent an email to the benefical mite people also and am waiting to hear back on cost for a few viles of good bugs.
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #26 on: June 26, 2017, 02:00:16 PM »
I spoke with a woman at RinconVitova and placed an order for 25,000 Neoseiulus californicus predator mites.  She said this is now the standard treatment and should get rid of them with 1 to 2 treatments.  They recommend around 250 per tree so that is only 4000 or so mites.  The cost for 5000 was 71$ and around 100$ for 25,000 so I am going with more than I need for a small extra cost.  She said the persea mites will infest grapes and stone fruits so I will be releasing some of them on those too as I will have enough to cover my entire growing area.  She was super friendly too, definitely easy to do business with.  Bugs will be here wednesday and released that night.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2017, 02:02:26 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

nattyfroootz

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #27 on: June 26, 2017, 02:26:02 PM »
Awesome, stoked to hear how they work out for you. RinconVitova's customer service is awesome, definitely very worth the price.  I think application suggests using envelopes stapled to leaves so make sure you have envelopes!

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #28 on: June 26, 2017, 03:26:48 PM »
Cool, glad you mentioned envelopes.  I had to go to riteaid for batteries anyway and picked up 100.
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #29 on: July 04, 2017, 04:41:11 PM »
Its been a couple weeks since releasing the predator mites.  My trees have stopping yellowing/spotting and no more leaf drop. I was able to get a macro shot of a cluster of mites.  I cant tell if they are the good or the bad guys.

« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 04:56:35 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #30 on: July 05, 2017, 09:23:03 AM »
Its been a couple weeks since releasing the predator mites.  My trees have stopping yellowing/spotting and no more leaf drop. I was able to get a macro shot of a cluster of mites.  I cant tell if they are the good or the bad guys.

Bad. The only good mite is a dead mite.

Your assessment of success and recovery may be a bit premature IMO.  Once damage is done the leaf never fully recovers in function or looks.  You'll need to focus on how healthy the new flush of leaves is and for how long.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 09:24:43 AM by Mark in Texas »

nattyfroootz

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #31 on: July 05, 2017, 12:43:27 PM »
I'm not sure you understand predatory mites mark. These mites don't consume plant tissue like the persea mites he is having an issue with. 

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #32 on: July 05, 2017, 02:36:31 PM »
Its ok, everyone is free to take care of their plants how they choose.  I always do my homework and try to make informed decisions.  From the research I did the predator mites seem to be the best defense against persea mites and the comercial growers also like these for their groves.  It is too soon to tell how well they will work in the long run but I can already see a major slowdown if not halt in leaf yellow and drop.  My grove went from 1 tree having persea mites to a dozen trees in a few weeks time.  They are very quick to multiply and spread.  I used about 5X the recommended amount of predator mites on my trees and honestly it seems to already have stopped the spread to the other trees.  If these predators can survive winter and be able to keep the persea mites down to a low enough population that the trees are happy then it will be well worth it.  Not to mention I don't use any toxic pesticides or herbacides on my food crops up to this point and I like to keep it that way.
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #33 on: July 06, 2017, 08:48:04 AM »
I'm not sure you understand predatory mites mark. These mites don't consume plant tissue like the persea mites he is having an issue with.

Of course

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #34 on: November 29, 2017, 11:44:36 PM »
Just wanted to update this thread.  My persea mites are completely gone.  They have been gone for many months.  It took 60 to 90 days to work completely. The trees have flushed many feet of new growth and no more new infestation.  I can not say for sure if it was the predators that cleared it up or if it was the really hot weather that killed the mites but they are gone.  I would be interested if JF or others still have mites on their new growth?

 The californicus mites can eat other pests and also organic matter and live through winter apparently so hopefully I will not need to re treat.

« Last Edit: November 29, 2017, 11:52:11 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Evildeadguy

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #35 on: November 30, 2017, 02:29:32 PM »
https://greenmethods.com/californicus/

good website to check out  if you haven't already seen it

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #36 on: September 15, 2018, 05:18:46 PM »
Just wanted to update this old thread.  I have had zero persea mites this year.  The predator mites seem to have completely eliminated them for the long run.  Its been over a year now with not a sign of them. 

Im wondering if others are still having them or if theirs cleared up on their own?
Brad Spaugh

Seanny

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #37 on: September 15, 2018, 06:43:52 PM »
My Reed had them in June but none on July flush.

Dylan SB

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #38 on: September 15, 2018, 06:53:14 PM »
This year all of my trees are clean.  I that that early heatwave we had in July really knocked them down.  I do not have any predatory mites and have not sprayed the trees either this year, while last year they were a problem causing premature leaf drop.

Jack, Nipomo

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #39 on: September 16, 2018, 09:04:01 AM »
Have had severe mites in the past (no poisons, hard nozzle spray, even a little oil) and big time leaf drop.  This year, with nothing done....no mites, no leaf drop.  108 degrees in July may have helped, but weather has been unusually warm all summer.  Probably cyclical for some reason.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #40 on: September 16, 2018, 04:10:37 PM »
The hotter and drier it is the more mites love it. 

spaugh

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #41 on: September 16, 2018, 05:12:11 PM »
I think that is the case Mark up to a certain point at which it is too much heat.  The document I posted earlier in this thread has a lot of good information on persea mites and when they thrive and decline.  Winter cold kills them and also mid summer heat.  I think people outside of CA dont realize how hot and dry it gets here.  We havent had a drop of rain in over six months and it has exceeded 100F for several weeks this summer.  According to the literature several days of 100 degree weather with low humidity kills persea mites.  That may not be the case for spider mites or other mites you have there.  I dont think persea mites exist in TX or FL.  They were brought into CA from Mexico and havent spread to FL that Im aware of. 
Brad Spaugh

Jack, Nipomo

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #42 on: September 16, 2018, 05:47:21 PM »
Quote from University of California IPM for avocados: "Persea mite numbers are suppressed or may crash when the daily high temperature is 100F or more on several consecutive days and humidity is low"

http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/r8400211.html

Mark in Texas

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #43 on: September 17, 2018, 10:43:53 AM »
Heck, I wouldn't know a persea from mamacia.  All I know is we had temps hit 107F, a summer high and my temps got up to 98-100F daily and my citrus trees got nailed by mites.  Here in Texas you can count on a mite flare up when it's hot and the RH is low and we had both including weeks without rain and very low RH.  What kind they are I don't know.

Forbid 4F is THE silver bullet for all stages of development and for all varieties or families.  1/8 - 1/4 tsp./gallon.   Took me 2 sprays to finally bring them under control.  If you can't safely and easily get mites under control with Forbid 4F, then it aint gonna happen.   ;)  BTW, it's not a poison and the mites can't build up a resistance to it.  Translaminar product too, a huge plus.

From the IPM ditty - Numbers generally peak in July and August. Persea mite populations are suppressed, and their numbers may decline rapidly, when the daily high temperature is 100F or more on several consecutive days and humidity is low.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Persea mites
« Reply #44 on: September 17, 2018, 10:46:15 AM »
Its been a couple weeks since releasing the predator mites.  My trees have stopping yellowing/spotting and no more leaf drop. I was able to get a macro shot of a cluster of mites.  I cant tell if they are the good or the bad guys.



Yeah, mine were more reddish pink.  Probably the two spotted kind.

 

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