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Author Topic: Avocado thread  (Read 45621 times)

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #200 on: April 09, 2018, 05:54:16 PM »

I have in ground 12 inches high seedling with Fuerte scion on it, grafted Jan 24; now it's blooming! (the scion is from my neighbor's very mature large tree).
I know I can't allow this to continue, should I pug it when and where?

Thanks...still learning!  :)

Dont pug it.  Its only a foot tall! Just let it grow.  Remove the flowers if you want, its going to be done flowering in a month anyway.  And remove any branches on the rootstock.

Fence looks pretty close by for a fuerte there Samu.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 05:55:51 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #201 on: April 09, 2018, 08:53:30 PM »
I probably should treat this like growing mango in SoCal: "Plant a seed, then graft after it's ready to bear fruits", or else I would be dealing with this bloom every year, holding up the growth. (Idea from Simon). I now realize that it's not a good idea to graft this little seedling that early.

So, I tend to remove the graft (only set me back 2 months), let the rootstock grow bigger, then regraft something like Reed and Pinkerton combo on it.
Yes, it looks darn close to the fence from the photo, but it's got about 3 feet distance, and I'll probably change the cultivar to Reed/Pinkerton combo instead...
Thanks for your response, Brad!
Sam

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #202 on: April 09, 2018, 10:49:22 PM »
NO!  Just let it grow.  The blooms will not slow it down.  This happens on all nursery stock avocado trees.  Its going to stop blooming and grow hard until november.   Its better to get the graft where you have it.

If you want a different cultivar thats another story.  You should still get the graft down low and forget about the blooms.  Avocados dont grow much if anyduring winter anyways, they just bloom.  Its not going to stunt the tree.



« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 10:54:46 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #203 on: April 10, 2018, 12:59:33 AM »
Agree with Brad. Very normal to have blooms and then from center of blooms you will have leaves growing.

Fuerte bears every other year and tends to spread out btw.

Unlike mango, if you remove the flowers more wonít spring up in their place. So you could pick them off but honestly the vast majority of flowers wonít set fruit, and for something this small itís not going to set or hold fruit unless you really babied and hormoned the hell out of it 🧐.

Iíve attaches 2 photos of some of my recent grafts. First is nimlioh with flowers as first push and then thin stalk of vegetative growth with leaves from where the flowers originated.

Second is of yamagata. There are 2 buds, both of which produced flowers, and one has obvious leaves coming from it while the second bud is just starting to push leaves.

K








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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #204 on: April 10, 2018, 01:18:14 AM »
Hello everyone! There are any variety that start to give fruit sooner? Thank's!  ;D


For good quality fruit and early fruiting, Pinkerton gives tons of flowers at an early age and does so every year.

If you donít care about high oil content quality,then get  mexicola, Jim bacon, zutano. These all flower early with many blooms. Carmen Hass reportedly tastes like hass but flowers 2-3 times per year, although you would have to keep track of which fruit belonged to which bloom period to make sure youíre picking them at peak flavor. Supposedly fruit from the third crop donít taste very good if the tree is carrying fruit from the first 2 crops, but I havenít had my tree long enough to test this.

Luisport

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #205 on: April 10, 2018, 05:03:52 AM »
Luisport,

Of the varieties I grow and feel like I know well enough, Gwen and Pinkerton seem most precocious.

And I'm also thinking of the trees not being in especially great pollination conditions, like with many bees and near opposite-type varieties. (In those conditions, it's harder to say how precocious a variety is on its own.)
Thank you very much!  ;)

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #206 on: April 10, 2018, 08:02:42 AM »
Hi Mark, it's excellent to see the prize of your Avocado plants popping back with such fervor after being so heavily smitten in the winter.  Did any of your other avocado trees recover?

That Reed is now another foot tall.   Gwen is pushing good wood.  My Oro Negro and cocktail tree of Pinkerton, Ardith, Sir Prize and Holiday are pushing Waldin rootstock.   Really pisses me off as I would have had a really good crop of them all this year.   

Been a grafting fool with a cherimoya cocktail tree pushing 3 varieties, got Stewart scions on 2 Fantastic rootstocks and one Stewart on a Bacon.  I was told by the fella who gifted me the Stewart that's it's better than Hass in tasted.   Whatever, been wanting this one for decades as an outdoor tree.  Can any one confirm the quality of Stewart?  Have not heard one bad thing about it.

Sam, I'll second what's been said about the Fuerte location - it belongs to your neighbor almost as much as it belongs to you.  Is he/she OK with it, or do they know?

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #207 on: April 10, 2018, 08:04:46 AM »
Second is of yamagata. There are 2 buds, both of which produced flowers, and one has obvious leaves coming from it while the second bud is just starting to push leaves.

Have you tasted Yamagata fruit?  What about Nishikawa?  Had the latter, lost it.   It was a Top Tropical tree....nuff said.

Samu

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #208 on: April 10, 2018, 02:05:57 PM »
NO!  Just let it grow.  The blooms will not slow it down.  This happens on all nursery stock avocado trees.  Its going to stop blooming and grow hard until november.   Its better to get the graft where you have it.

If you want a different cultivar thats another story.  You should still get the graft down low and forget about the blooms.  Avocados dont grow much if anyduring winter anyways, they just bloom.  Its not going to stunt the tree.
Agree with Brad. Very normal to have blooms and then from center of blooms you will have leaves growing.

Fuerte bears every other year and tends to spread out btw.

Unlike mango, if you remove the flowers more wonít spring up in their place. So you could pick them off but honestly the vast majority of flowers wonít set fruit, and for something this small itís not going to set or hold fruit unless you really babied and hormoned the hell out of it 🧐.
Always learning something new!

Sam, I'll second what's been said about the Fuerte location - it belongs to your neighbor almost as much as it belongs to you.  Is he/she OK with it, or do they know?
OK, I hear you, I'll move it to different location. Thanks everyone!

 
Sam

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #209 on: April 19, 2018, 06:52:09 PM »
Here some more sir prize, hass, and a pinkerton.  The Sir Prize has really improved in the last month.  April is a good time to pick them, the flesh gets really dense and buttery.  Im going to try and let the few remaining ones hang util June if possible.



Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #210 on: April 20, 2018, 01:23:26 AM »
Second is of yamagata. There are 2 buds, both of which produced flowers, and one has obvious leaves coming from it while the second bud is just starting to push leaves.

Have you tasted Yamagata fruit?  What about Nishikawa?  Had the latter, lost it.   It was a Top Tropical tree....nuff said.


Hi Mark

Sorry I didnít respond earlier. I havenít tried any of the fruit. Hopefully Iíll have something to show for it in a couple of years.

🤗

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #211 on: April 20, 2018, 08:06:08 AM »
Here some more sir prize, hass, and a pinkerton.  The Sir Prize has really improved in the last month.  April is a good time to pick them, the flesh gets really dense and buttery.  Im going to try and let the few remaining ones hang util June if possible.




Looks fantastic.   

funlul

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #212 on: April 21, 2018, 01:48:29 AM »
Hi all, I am looking for avocado recommendation in Socal. What variety tastes good for September thru December?

On my tree, Fuerte (December-April) and Reed (May-September) are dominant, followed by Jan Boyce (December-January-ish despite what online sources say), Sharwill (grows too slowly to count), and small graft of suspected Mexicola's season is yet to be seen (allegedly 2 harvests, July and January).

I guess holiday is an obvious choice, but I somehow heard it does not produce that well?
Looking for scionwoods: loquat, cherimoya, jujube, chocolate perssimon

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #213 on: April 30, 2018, 05:17:10 PM »
It's bacon, so nothing to get overly excited over but still an impressive fruit set.  Look's like it will hold a good share of those.  The other trees look like heavy fruit set also but not quite as far along yet. 

Brad Spaugh

Lory

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #214 on: May 01, 2018, 03:50:17 AM »
I'm really IMPRESSED to see the fruit set you can get with your trees!
I consider myself LUCKY when my avocado tree sets ONE fruit every 10 flower panicles!  ;)
Lorenzo

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #215 on: May 01, 2018, 12:58:03 PM »
I'm really IMPRESSED to see the fruit set you can get with your trees!
I consider myself LUCKY when my avocado tree sets ONE fruit every 10 flower panicles!  ;)

I actually do very little for the trees.  My neighbors have honey bee hives that do all the work.  I was surprised by this year's fruit set also.  Will post more pic's of all the trees in a few weeks when the others catch up.

One of my neighbors got a mason bee hive.  It's just little bamboo shoots.  Apparently those bees are 100X more productive than standard honey bees.  I have seen a few of these bees hanging around  here doing work.  A very small mason bee hive could house a lot of very powerful bees.  Something any homeowner backyard gardener can get super cheap.  They sell on amazon and it's something you could easily make.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #216 on: May 01, 2018, 02:28:37 PM »
I must have 100 thousands fruitlets at all different stages on one of my Sir Prize....Iím lucky if 400-500 hundred cross the finish line.

Lory

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #217 on: May 01, 2018, 09:08:34 PM »
BEES are the key!
I know pollination is the crucial stage and in my case everything is more difficult since only 2 trees  are flowering and they are far from each other....i will try to find a bees hive for my garden
Lorenzo

spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #218 on: May 01, 2018, 11:14:42 PM »
BEES are the key!
I know pollination is the crucial stage and in my case everything is more difficult since only 2 trees  are flowering and they are far from each other....i will try to find a bees hive for my garden

Get a carpenter bee nest.  They are really small and easy to make.  Honey bees are more complicated.  I searched "carpenter bees of Phillipines" and it looks like they use carpenter bees to pollinate passionfruit there.  So if you make a carpenter bee hive, they should come live there.  It's worth a try.  Much easier than dealing with honey bees.

You may be able to get carpenter bees by just drilling holes in a piece of wood.  Look it up, I haven't made one but they sell simple bamboo ones at the store.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2018, 11:16:30 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #219 on: May 01, 2018, 11:22:31 PM »
hii, greeting

i'm newb on avocados, only a few variety like marcus, hass, yamagata,and some local variety..i live in tropical climate

any suggestions for large type variety with the best taste among them?

Lory

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #220 on: May 02, 2018, 05:02:21 AM »
BEES are the key!
I know pollination is the crucial stage and in my case everything is more difficult since only 2 trees  are flowering and they are far from each other....i will try to find a bees hive for my garden

Get a carpenter bee nest.  They are really small and easy to make.  Honey bees are more complicated.  I searched "carpenter bees of Phillipines" and it looks like they use carpenter bees to pollinate passionfruit there.  So if you make a carpenter bee hive, they should come live there.  It's worth a try.  Much easier than dealing with honey bees.

You may be able to get carpenter bees by just drilling holes in a piece of wood.  Look it up, I haven't made one but they sell simple bamboo ones at the store.

Sounds extremely interesting!
i will give a try, thanks for the brilliant idea :-)
Lorenzo

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #221 on: May 02, 2018, 07:21:27 AM »
BEES are the key!

And flies.   Must have hundreds like this one on a Gwen.



There's 8 on this small flower cluster.  It's really bad when your avocado trees stink enough to attract flies.   ::)


« Last Edit: May 02, 2018, 07:23:51 AM by Mark in Texas »

owenismo

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #222 on: May 04, 2018, 11:44:37 PM »
Do you guys know what kind of dwarf avocado is at Lowe's? I would like to get a GEM avocado. I figured out my soil is clay, so I would have to grow it in a 15 gallon or raised planter. Not having any luck coming across GEM. Any other dwarf suggestions that you guys think is good tasting and abundant of fruit? Or should I just get the lowe's dwarf.

OCchris1

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #223 on: May 05, 2018, 02:44:23 AM »
Did someone take a shit under your tree to get the flies Mark? ;) I've never seen a fly in my yard on a flower. Good luck to you...I know you had a rough winter. Chris
-Chris

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado thread
« Reply #224 on: May 05, 2018, 09:12:49 AM »
Did someone take a shit under your tree to get the flies Mark? ;) I've never seen a fly in my yard on a flower. Good luck to you...I know you had a rough winter. Chris

Not that I know of. 

I have some really strange pollinators, 100's of them at any given time.  Those are houseflies, have others that have that shiny blue butt....so purty!  Bees, moths, butterflies.  Being in the country helps.

 

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