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Author Topic: Australian "Custard Apple" Video  (Read 1341 times)

murahilin

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Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« on: August 24, 2012, 12:34:04 PM »
http://www.custardapple.com.au/flash.html

Interesting video about Australian custard apples, or atemoyas as they are known here in the US.

Tim

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2012, 12:38:30 PM »
"who wears short shorts..."  haha j/k

awesome vid, thanks.
Tim

murahilin

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2012, 12:40:43 PM »
"who wears short shorts..."  haha j/k

awesome vid, thanks.

MikeT needs to let us know if that is the standard custard apple picking attire.

Mike T

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2012, 03:50:12 PM »
What's wrong with the shorts? Many 'happenin dudes' where shorts like that.Backwoods folk in SEQ have that hillbilly accent.There actually wasn't much information on growing them or varieties and you would have noticed the word atemoya is never used.The US custard apple is a bullocks heart.
Mammoths in the film just were not big enough for Pinks Mammoth I reckon and could have been paxton prolific.

Future

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2012, 03:51:51 PM »
I very much enjoyed these while in Australia last year.  Massive fruits.  I went to large "Asian" markets that had them by the score at each stall.  I am planting seeds shortly.

Mike T

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2012, 04:17:35 PM »
They are often in the major supermarket chains by the way and seem to be popular with elderly folk who remember them (especially mammoths) as popular fruit from when they were young.The vid shows a glasshouse mountain in the background so that farm would have similar rainfall and latitude to a little north of Miami.It would have a cooler summer than the equivalent line in Florida however.

lkailburn

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2012, 06:04:55 PM »
Neat video  :)
Is the taste of atemoya much different from cherimoya?

-Luke

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2012, 02:10:13 AM »
Neat video  :)
Is the taste of atemoya much different from cherimoya?

-Luke

Taste is almost identical, but usually the texture of cherimoyas is far superior, being more creamy and soft. But it sounds like in Australia they have a lot better selection of atemoyas and more development of new improved varieties than we have in USA. So wouldn't be surprised if some of their cultivars are as good or almost as good as top cherimoyas.
Oscar

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2012, 07:27:13 PM »
The red skinned one was shelved apparently. Thought consumers were just really getting used to the green types and introducing a red one would confuse the market. I'm still on a quest to get some scions to graft to my PP/KJP. I have a seedling of it at the farm, but no telling what that will turn out like.
The Glasshouse Mountains is a fantastic place to grow fruit. Those are ancient volcanic plugs and the soil around there is a fantastic sandy volcanic loam mix. I'd love to eventually get a farm there as its soil and distance from the beach make it a perfect spot - not to mention the hiking, views and access to very popular farmer's markets in the area.
Mike, the ones shown there as Mammoth were most likely the Hilary Whites budsport, the ones on the conveyor belt were smaller mammoths in all their warty glory. Just looking at an African Pride makes me angry!  :P
Custard Apple is often used for all of the custardy apples - atemoya, cherimoya, sweetsop, rollinia, ilama. The name Cutard Apple is imprecise and a descriptor and is used here in that spirit.

Mike T

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2012, 12:03:54 AM »
BMc are you mad because AP is unfit to be in elite company?

 My 2 big atemoyas are gefner and AP because I'm stupid and got them on special. They produce pretty well and are nice enough fruit.I do know however I should have planted anything else as they are probably the 2 poorest quality types. Maybe if I saw them off I could topwork with other varieties.

BMc

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2012, 12:36:33 AM »
BMc are you mad because AP is unfit to be in elite company?

 My 2 big atemoyas are gefner and AP because I'm stupid and got them on special. They produce pretty well and are nice enough fruit.I do know however I should have planted anything else as they are probably the 2 poorest quality types. Maybe if I saw them off I could topwork with other varieties.

I just imagine a mouth full of seeds and awful chewy flesh whenever I see an AP. Thats only after discovering the self fertile budsports of PM and the ease of growing them as backyard trees though. Its made me a bit of an atemoya snob  :P. We still have a few giant AP trees in the family, but all face a date with sharpened iron very soon.

Mike T

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2012, 12:45:48 AM »
BMc it would be a shame to waste the rootstock if you can topwork.It would allow you to have TS,PP and MG on a single tree.

BMc

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2012, 12:50:28 AM »
BMc it would be a shame to waste the rootstock if you can topwork.It would allow you to have TS,PP and MG on a single tree.

Yes, I'll have to think about how to top work, as they are over 20yo and enormous. I'd have to stump them and work the new growth methinks.

murahilin

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #13 on: August 27, 2012, 06:34:25 PM »
The red skinned one was shelved apparently. Thought consumers were just really getting used to the green types and introducing a red one would confuse the market. I'm still on a quest to get some scions to graft to my PP/KJP. I have a seedling of it at the farm, but no telling what that will turn out like.
The Glasshouse Mountains is a fantastic place to grow fruit. Those are ancient volcanic plugs and the soil around there is a fantastic sandy volcanic loam mix. I'd love to eventually get a farm there as its soil and distance from the beach make it a perfect spot - not to mention the hiking, views and access to very popular farmer's markets in the area.
Mike, the ones shown there as Mammoth were most likely the Hilary Whites budsport, the ones on the conveyor belt were smaller mammoths in all their warty glory. Just looking at an African Pride makes me angry!  :P
Custard Apple is often used for all of the custardy apples - atemoya, cherimoya, sweetsop, rollinia, ilama. The name Cutard Apple is imprecise and a descriptor and is used here in that spirit.

I didn't realize that all of those species were referred to as custard apple in AU. Do some people think they are all the same species or is it generally known that they are all different species and not just different cultivars?

BMc

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Re: Australian "Custard Apple" Video
« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2012, 06:51:40 PM »
People know they are different, but call them custard apples, usually with different qualifiers before 'custard apple'.
Rollinia - Brazilian Custard Apple
Atemoya - Custard Apple
Cherimoya - Cold Hardy Custard Apple
Ilama (and sometimes the red reticulatas and crosses) - Red Custard Apple
Reticulata - Mexican Custard Apple
Sweetsop (purple ones) - Purple Custard Apple
Of course, not everyone uses these names, but I've seen them applied here before. Often at markets people will call them 'Custard Aplle' to relate the fruit to a market that is not familiar with the XXmoya name, then the market name sticks. Like Mike has said, the one called Custard Apple least often is reticulata, which is known as Bullocks Heart most often - where it is grown that is, because the quality of them here is rubbish.

 

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