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Author Topic: Mango tree fertilizer  (Read 8128 times)

561MangoFanatic

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Mango tree fertilizer
« on: August 18, 2017, 04:22:45 PM »
So I wanted to change my fertilizers & was wondering if I use these to fertilize my mango trees (& my Miracle fruit), am I over doing it?



Wanted to use this as my base. And then add this supplement for K-



Or use this to supplement-




Can I use this one regularly with the first one?
Sergio

zands

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2017, 10:02:56 AM »
What's so bad about going to Excalibur nursery and getting some of their 8-3-9?

561MangoFanatic

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2017, 06:01:04 PM »
What's so bad about going to Excalibur nursery and getting some of their 8-3-9?

Economically it's great for inorganic.. but I've talked to the person who helped formulate that fertilizer mix & I honestly didn't like that sewage cleaner type of chemicals "might" or could be present...  looking to go 100% Organic since others keep telling me it can't be done & also I want to grow only natural & organic food! You are what you eat!! & don't want anything else harmful that I can prevent with some research and time. & since I was trying to mimic a 8-3-16 fertilizer I don't see why I can't use a 8-4-22. I wanted to find a 0-0-16 to add to the 8-4-2 that way during winter I could go 0-3-22.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 06:08:53 PM by 561MangoFanatic »
Sergio

bsbullie

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2017, 06:07:59 PM »
You are way over thinking it and far to obsessed with being pure organic.  You are also focusing on the NPK numbers without knowing what is behind them (while the ratio is important, just cause it has a certain ratio does not make it good for fruit trees).  The Excalibur 8-3-9 is a great fertilizer for young trees.  It was custom blended for this area and to have a very good minor element package.
- Rob

zands

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2017, 07:31:30 PM »
I vote over thinking too. Whatever infinitesimal bad stuff there is in 8-3-9 will never be found in your mangoes. Mulch heavily with wood chips in a three ft diameter. This is your organic faction. Sprinkle 8 3 9 on top of your mulch where to a certain extent it gets chelated into your mulch. Then it all gets into your soil, makes it black, organic, with lots of beneficial micro organisms.

Your mangoes will have a full "organic" taste.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 07:48:15 PM by zands »

beefyboy

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2017, 09:05:51 PM »
I also would put my dollar on the 8-4-8 with micro's, which has blown up everything it touches in my own yard.
You can't go wrong with any of these, depending on whats available in your area.

gnappi

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2017, 12:41:55 AM »
Every one of my trees took a definite uptick after switching to the Excalibur fertilizer. It's nearly 100 miles round trip for me and well worth it.

Regards,

   Gary

561MangoFanatic

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2017, 11:20:48 AM »
I have minors that I had planned to add the 8-4-22 mix I was going to make. Anyway I still won't use the Excalibur mix personally.. I'll keep using this mix before I do that.. 






As for over focusing on "organic", yeah possibly 🤣 But that's how I garden & everything I've ever grown & had tasted by others speaks for itself & its 100% "organic". To some that doesn't matter but I don't conform to that notion... doesn't mean I don't take into account everything that everyone else says, you guys have more knowledge & experience but if I can prove you wrong & find new ways to do things I will!!😁
Plus I admit when I'm wrong, even if I have to learn the hard way sometimes.. looks to be one of those  ::)
Sergio

koundog

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2017, 12:19:33 PM »
I'm for it I would never use an inorganic fertilizer either you seem to have a good plan as for you original question don't worry about the ratios I've used some of them before look into the cost of each bag and how much you will be needing if you have a lot of trees it can get expensive pretty quick.

bsbullie

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2017, 12:23:11 PM »
Dont worry about the ratios?  Hahahahahaha...giid luck with your trees.

- Rob

murahilin

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2017, 12:52:44 PM »
I recommend Espoma Citrus Tone to fertilize your young mango trees (and most other fruit trees). I've used it for years and my trees have all done well. It's organic and has a good ratio.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Espoma-8-lb-Citrus-Tone-Plant-Food-100047221/202258534


edit: I also wanted to point out that I don't think "inorganic" is the correct term you should be using. "Non-organic" is better suited. Inorganic usually defines something that is not carbon based.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 12:57:03 PM by murahilin »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2017, 01:20:59 PM »
Good points by Murahilin.

About the first three pictures of this thread, could we please see close-up pictures of the fine print giving the detailed ingredients?
Har

palmcity

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2017, 01:41:53 PM »
Once a plant takes up inorganic substances like potassium, calcium, Magnesium, etc. from the soil whether it be from an inorganic source added to the soil or from the death of an organic plant, animal, etc..... The plant that took it up is an organic plant.... If it absorbed the minerals etc....Great... If not adjust the quantity dispensed per time lower or higher, also ph, water, etc. till it does.... If it takes it up ..... I'm quite happy with my organic tree doing so....

My plants would probably take up some of all of the listed fertilizers but not all of the chemicals in any of the fertilizers....I bet my plants would grow just fine on top of a garbage land field with a covering of a few inches of surface soil and the roots growing through the garbage picking up only what they need and leaving the rest if water and adequate ph existed. I would also "probably" be comfortable eating the fruit from any of these trees for my own consumption... (also may need to add calcium, & other minerals to taste good) My plants tell me they take up what they feel they need... I know cause I talk to them... ha   ;) 

So to repeat again.... All may be good.... Just watch & talk to your plants (also check soil ph, NPK, minerals, if equipment is available)....

I noticed Har after I posted.... I'm just being amused with organic vs. inorganic words... He's the knowledgeable expert on probability of success with the products....
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 01:54:10 PM by palmcity »

zands

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2017, 02:53:19 PM »
When I plant a fruit tree I throw one or two bags of HD top soil in the hole and mix it in. This stuff is nice and black.

I would not bother using organic fertilizers. They are generally too expensive. My real concern is getting the soil that my mango tree or any fruit tree is planted in....Transforming that soil into a rich organic soil that is black and full of mycorrhizal bacteria which greatly help roots and root hairs pick up soil nutrients.

My experience shows this can be done with wood chip mulch and 8 3 9/which has those important minor elements. HD and Lowes carry avocado fertilizers that are 6 4 6 with minor elements. This is next best after 8 3 9.

Summary -- 3ft diameter wood chip mulch and sprinkle 8 3 9 on top of mulch and you will get organic soil for your fruit trees to grow in. Give it two years.

Then if you want to go all in you can also do foliar sprays. Anti fungal sprays and nutrient sprays like the easy to find Southern Ag citrus spray found in HD and probably Lowes. Though there are better ones.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 02:59:01 PM by zands »

bsbullie

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2017, 03:07:01 PM »
Adding top soil to a hole for trees in Florida is not a good idea (although anyone is free to do what the want).  Also, specifically with respect to mangoes, they do not like black, rich soils.  They love and thrive in well draining the sugar sand that is found in East Palm Beach County (Walter Zill's,  Chris Wentzel/Truly Tropical and Alex/Stuurock Grove).
- Rob

zands

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2017, 03:19:41 PM »
Adding top soil to a hole for trees in Florida is not a good idea (although anyone is free to do what the want).  Also, specifically with respect to mangoes, they do not like black, rich soils.  They love and thrive in well draining the sugar sand that is found in East Palm Beach County (Walter Zill's,  Chris Wentzel/Truly Tropical and Alex/Stuurock Grove).

All I can say is that this has worked for me to achieve mango tree lift-off. To establish a 3 gallon mango tree. I want black soil to start them off and than adding to, increasing the black soil via wood chip mulch and a solid fertilizer w micros like 8 3 9.  I would not do this in a mucky soil. Black is the new black as far as good soils go for fruit trees. At least in my book.

They love and thrive in well draining the sugar sand ......

In PB county you usually have that neutral PH sugar sand. My soil is hi-PH, is sandy, fast draining and calcerous with coral rock in it. So maybe me planting mango and other fruit trees with black, organic looking HD topsoil (in bags) is more necessary to counter act the high-PH soil so that nutrients can be absorbed better
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 03:26:38 PM by zands »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2017, 06:00:01 PM »
You are way over thinking it and far to obsessed with being pure organic.

Thank God I'm not the only one that thinks this way.  You don't know what's in "organics" either unless you submit those rocket fuels to a lab for analysis. 

Recommend Peter's if you're worried about purity.

I use slow release foods too on my trees, tropical and otherwise.  Takes most of the maintenance out of it.   
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 06:02:20 PM by Mark in Texas »

Guanabanus

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #17 on: August 20, 2017, 09:01:34 PM »
Definitely true, that composts can have just about any kind of pollutant in them. 

Around here (sandy soils paralleling the old US-1 and I-95), locally produced woodchips and composts from wood chips, are rather spiked with Lead, from the old-fashioned leaded gasolines.
Har

palmcity

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #18 on: August 20, 2017, 11:59:14 PM »
Do NOT panic concerning growing mangos ......May as well read over current EPA material concerning LEAD...

https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2014-03/documents/urban_gardening_fina_fact_sheet.pdf


"While gardening, the GREATEST risk of exposure to contaminants is from contaminated
soil getting into your MOUTH or by BREATHING in contaminated dust. For example,
children playing in the garden may directly EAT SOIL through hand-to-mouth play, or
people may eat plants without first washing them to remove soil and dust. SKIN CONTACT
(dermal exposure) with soils containing contaminants such as PAHs, chromium and
trichloroethylene (TCE) can pose health risks."


ONCE washed & Brought in to the TABLE = MINIMUM RISK with ROOT products being higher risk in this minimum risk category::: per EPA:::
"Some edible plants do take up and accumulate contaminants. A plantís uptake of
contaminants depends on many factors, including the type of plant and the pH and
organic content of the soil. However, research shows that there is MINIMAL RISK of
exposure from eating plants grown in contaminated soils. To reduce concerns of
exposure from eating plants, wash produce thoroughly before eating to remove
potential soil contamination. Root vegetables have a higher potential for accumulating
contaminants. In some cases, it may be prudent to avoid growing edible plants in soils
with high contaminant concentrations. "


However, the following is A COMMON HEALTH RISK:::
Touching lead weights etc. with bare hands. If one then puts their fingers in their mouth = more chance of absorption... Tell your kids not to touch lead weights etc... (common when people are going fishing)... https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002473.htm



pineislander

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #19 on: August 21, 2017, 07:43:43 AM »
You mean that when I bit those split weights to crimp them on the line that was a bad thing? Used to play with Mercury in bare hands too. Wonder I'm alive and not a dope, well sorta senile at 62........

zands

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2017, 08:25:03 AM »
Definitely true, that composts can have just about any kind of pollutant in them. 

Around here (sandy soils paralleling the old US-1 and I-95), locally produced woodchips and composts from wood chips, are rather spiked with Lead, from the old-fashioned leaded gasolines.

Lead gasoline was phased out long ago and the lead that was put out from automobiles has washed downward through our sandy soils and must be washed out to the oceans by now. Even if we were still in the leaded gasoline era, all that wood in the trees acts as a buffer. The lead would lodge in there.
You know better, but I would say that you take the above ground wood and leaves of a mango tree and it must weigh 10-20 times more than the fruit it produces.

You will never find much lead in the mango fruits or other fruits. The tree filters them out and absorbs them.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2017, 08:28:34 AM by zands »

palmcity

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2017, 08:41:59 AM »
You mean that when I bit those split weights to crimp them on the line that was a bad thing? Used to play with Mercury in bare hands too. Wonder I'm alive and not a dope, well sorta senile at 62........

Unfortunately, I'm with you in the category that crimped the lead sinker weights on fishing line with my teeth when a kid... I was not warned... They say the risks are higher for problems with nerve development the younger you were when exposed. Maybe we were just lucky with the amounts exposed/absorbed and the response by the body to the exposure... Then again, maybe we just don't know how bad off we really are...

Dive weights commonly stored in the house often have lead and should be secured away from young children.

sidney

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #22 on: August 21, 2017, 10:38:25 AM »
I don't know much about mangos but recently attended a talk by a grower at our club meeting and he recommended using lie nitrogen ratios. The goal is not dark green leaves but high sugar fruit. I am trying his ideas.

behlgarden

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #23 on: August 21, 2017, 10:54:11 AM »
I vote over thinking too. Whatever infinitesimal bad stuff there is in 8-3-9 will never be found in your mangoes. Mulch heavily with wood chips in a three ft diameter. This is your organic faction. Sprinkle 8 3 9 on top of your mulch where to a certain extent it gets chelated into your mulch. Then it all gets into your soil, makes it black, organic, with lots of beneficial micro organisms.

Your mangoes will have a full "organic" taste.

I agree with Both Zands and Rob, if you think about it the chemical fertilizers are also natural occurring from planet earth derived via process, in the end NPK is still going to be NPK regardless of how it was formed. The biggest key is to ensure there is decent mulch which will provide much needed cover, make soil fertile, and fix water issues.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Mango tree fertilizer
« Reply #24 on: August 21, 2017, 11:38:38 AM »
Salts, 13 essential elements is required for production.  Whether it's derived from organic sources or conventional fertilizers, our plants/trees don't care.  Only humans do who have been brain washed and shaped by crafty marketers into a nation of sucker bets, hypochondriacs and neurotics.

The other elements like silicon can be beneficial to some plants regarding disease resistance..........

Bring on the Round-up.  :D

 

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