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Author Topic: Kari star fruit question  (Read 570 times)

green thumps up

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Kari star fruit question
« on: December 11, 2017, 11:48:25 PM »
I bought a 15 gallon kari star fruit around thanksgiving. I put the tree outside in san diego weather and i noticed the leaves are starting to turn yellow and have dried up.

Do star fruit trees lose their leaves in winter?

I had to move the pot and tree inside the garage during the strong santa ana winds. The tree did experience the wind for some times. Could that also caused the leaves to dried up?
« Last Edit: December 11, 2017, 11:50:02 PM by green thumps up »

Vernmented

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Re: Kari star fruit question
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2017, 08:05:36 AM »
Starfruit hate wind more than anything. That would be the culprit. Windbreaks are always part of commercial groves in Florida. You can fruit them in pots but I would get it in a root pruning pot if you are going that route. If not, stick it in the most sheltered area you have with full (best) to part sun. They like acid soil as well. Kari is a great cultivar.
-Josh

green thumps up

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Re: Kari star fruit question
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2017, 09:31:05 AM »
Do you know if the star fruit trees are strong meaning the tree is still alive even if the leaves are dried up? I'm planning to wait until spring and then put it in the ground.

demingcr

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Re: Kari star fruit question
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2017, 10:38:36 AM »
Do you know if the star fruit trees are strong meaning the tree is still alive even if the leaves are dried up? I'm planning to wait until spring and then put it in the ground.

Mine have recovered a few times, but they do seem to get progressively weaker each time they re-flush, particularly as the new growth is extra sensitive to wind.

Mine also seem particularly sensitive to PH in the soil and show deficiencies regularly prior to correction.
- Colin

green thumps up

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Re: Kari star fruit question
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2017, 10:50:56 AM »
Thanks for the info. :-)

simon_grow

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Re: Kari star fruit question
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2017, 01:49:51 PM »
I donít know much about Starfruit but Iíve read that they may need more micronutrients especially if your soil or water are high in PH.

Simon

raiders36

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Re: Kari star fruit question
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2017, 04:48:31 PM »
Starfruit tree are very resilient. No need to worry. Here in San Jose, CA leaves fall off during the winter and new growth emerges when the warm weather arrives.

green thumps up

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Re: Kari star fruit question
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2017, 06:53:05 PM »
Thanks for the info raiders36. I still see a few young leaves starting to sprout.

 

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