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Author Topic: starch mango  (Read 660 times)

starch

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starch mango
« on: January 09, 2018, 04:52:09 PM »
I have just learned that there is a mango variety called starch. A quick google search tells me it is a favored mango from Trinidad.

Based on the name, I am very intrigued :)

Can anybody describe the flavor and characteristics of the fruit?
- Mark

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2018, 06:08:39 PM »
Creamy, rich, very sweet, yellow flesh, lots of fiber (not a bad thing), about the size of a retired tennis ball but not round so it fits in the hand. Very susceptible to sap burn and anthrac on the tree and when picked ripe. Shelf life is short (3-5days). Very productive. Vigorous upright grower. Gets mango seed borer insects allot. This is from observing it in Trinidad.
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Future

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2018, 06:48:11 PM »
This is distinct from "Ice Cream"?

TnTrobbie

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The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)
F*ck squirrels
and deers

TnTrobbie

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2018, 08:07:30 AM »
Forgot to mention, if you love the "chaulky" mouthfeel character that some ripe mangoes have, Starch mango has it while being juicy and sweet without being dry. Delicious. Produces in clusters. I'd estimate brix to be around 24-26%
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)
F*ck squirrels
and deers

Mark in Texas

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2018, 08:51:30 AM »
I have just learned that there is a mango variety called starch. A quick google search tells me it is a favored mango from Trinidad.

Based on the name, I am very intrigued :)

Can anybody describe the flavor and characteristics of the fruit?

There a two worldwide mango growers Facebook groups.  Are you Jay cause he started a thread on it here - https://www.facebook.com/groups/656091337926681/    I am surprised that you guys know about Starch Mango!! Trinidad and Tobago Variety, very popular, most consider it superior to Julie. It is a Medium size tree that can fruit very heavily. The newer versions have less fiber but still a fruit with fiber, they can be VERY sweet and creamy with some Tartness also.


skhan

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2018, 09:12:53 AM »
Forgot to mention, if you love the "chaulky" mouthfeel character that some ripe mangoes have, Starch mango has it while being juicy and sweet without being dry. Delicious. Produces in clusters. I'd estimate brix to be around 24-26%

Roberto,

Thanks for the write-up, it's great having some info on these more regional mangos.
I always here this mango mentioned by my Trini friends.
I figured the chalky texture would be the reason they call it starch mango, so its great that you verified my assumption

I personally like the chalky texture when a mango is sweet. It gives the juice a nice viscosity.

Do you have this variety growing at your place?
Also in your top five mangos that hail from Trinidad?
Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2018

TnTrobbie

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2018, 06:14:46 PM »
I have a seedling (poly, two sprouts) about 1 ft tall so who knows what that would be. Don't have a top 5, but my top 3 would be Julie, Starch, and 3rd Calabash. Mind you, I have not even heard of Ice Cream and Graham until migrating to the US :P.
The Earth laughs in flowers. And bear gifts through fruits.
No where to plant it...but atleast I got it. ;)
F*ck squirrels
and deers

Jani

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2018, 07:00:57 PM »
I have just learned that there is a mango variety called starch. A quick google search tells me it is a favored mango from Trinidad.

Based on the name, I am very intrigued :)

Can anybody describe the flavor and characteristics of the fruit?

There a two worldwide mango growers Facebook groups.  Are you Jay cause he started a thread on it here - https://www.facebook.com/groups/656091337926681/    I am surprised that you guys know about Starch Mango!! Trinidad and Tobago Variety, very popular, most consider it superior to Julie. It is a Medium size tree that can fruit very heavily. The newer versions have less fiber but still a fruit with fiber, they can be VERY sweet and creamy with some Tartness also.
lost me at....superior to Julie... starch is a poor man's  east Indian mango
always longing for a JA Julie

Jani

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2018, 07:08:01 PM »
I have a seedling (poly, two sprouts) about 1 ft tall so who knows what that would be. Don't have a top 5, but my top 3 would be Julie, Starch, and 3rd Calabash. Mind you, I have not even heard of Ice Cream and Graham until migrating to the US :P.

Likewise re ice cream, I knew about Graham from Jamaica though it wasn't as widely known or popular as Julie, Bombay, east Indian or #11
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 07:14:39 PM by Jani »
always longing for a JA Julie

Jani

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2018, 07:24:44 PM »
Forgot to mention, if you love the "chaulky" mouthfeel character that some ripe mangoes have, Starch mango has it while being juicy and sweet without being dry. Delicious. Produces in clusters. I'd estimate brix to be around 24-26%

Roberto,

Thanks for the write-up, it's great having some info on these more regional mangos.
I always here this mango mentioned by my Trini friends.
I figured the chalky texture would be the reason they call it starch mango, so its great that you verified my assumption

I personally like the chalky texture when a mango is sweet. It gives the juice a nice viscosity.

Do you have this variety growing at your place?
Also in your top five mangos that hail from Trinidad?
re: regional mango... I had a lovely little mango in Barbados  a couple years ago called Ceylon..and from what i heard it's also in neighboring eastern Caribbean islands like Grenada.

Completely fiber free and creamy smooth but firm ish yellow texture, great sweet and acidic ratio. Pretty blemish free fruit and awesome growth habit and precocious similar to Pickering in both traits. I have access to two trees from family there, hopefully one day ill get some scions up here.
always longing for a JA Julie

pineislander

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2018, 07:48:55 PM »
I have just learned that there is a mango variety called starch. A quick google search tells me it is a favored mango from Trinidad.

Based on the name, I am very intrigued :)

Can anybody describe the flavor and characteristics of the fruit?

There a two worldwide mango growers Facebook groups.  Are you Jay cause he started a thread on it here - https://www.facebook.com/groups/656091337926681/    I am surprised that you guys know about Starch Mango!! Trinidad and Tobago Variety, very popular, most consider it superior to Julie. It is a Medium size tree that can fruit very heavily. The newer versions have less fiber but still a fruit with fiber, they can be VERY sweet and creamy with some Tartness also.

I'm Jay, Mark and posted the question because a neighbor lost a 30 year old Starch mango tree during hurricane Irma  and is seeking a replacement. Some folks enjoy the fruit but I wasn't particularly fond of it though I only tried it one season, and most were windfalls. It is probably one of those things where a taste you grew up with can evoke very strong personal feelings and loyalty.

Mark in Texas

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Re: starch mango
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2018, 07:42:44 AM »
I'm Jay, Mark, and posted the question because a neighbor lost a 30 year old Starch mango tree during hurricane Irma  and is seeking a replacement. Some folks enjoy the fruit but I wasn't particularly fond of it though I only tried it one season, and most were windfalls. It is probably one of those things where a taste you grew up with can evoke very strong personal feelings and loyalty.

Hi Jay.  Interesting how that works, like some kind of taste/smell deja vu.  As long as it doesn't smell like turnip greens smothered in onions boiling away on a stove top..... :D

Here in Texas folks growing tropicals in large greenhouses suited for protecting tall fruit trees are few and far between.  In fact as far as I know I'm the only one "crazy" enough to be growing in a greenhouse with 10' columns and an 18' peak.  Where I'm going with this is there's hundreds of backyard growers in Texas growing mangos when they shouldn't be except for the fantastic dwarf, Pickering.  They have to haul them in to a hoophouse, the garage or the bathroom come freezes.

We just had a 5 day spell of very frigid weather and a Houston grower posted a 15' tall backyard mango tree with Lemon Zest and Mahachanok grafted high and asked, "how do I protect this"?...a bit tongue in cheek.  I advised he cut it down to 1' above the ground and graft low.   ???  He actually got it covered and it's loaded with blossoms now!

 

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