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Author Topic: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell  (Read 3235 times)

amaqeq

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Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« on: September 21, 2012, 05:58:28 AM »
Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell

Comfrey Bocking 14
If you happen to have a bit free space outside which is not yet dedicated for other plants
And if you are interested in being a bit self sufficient regarding fertilizing
Comfrey is an great plant to plant
Since the normal comfrey is an invasive plant and at flowering season it distributes endless seeds who will become “hard to get rid of seedlings” there is an cultivar named Bocking 14 which is Barren and therefore propagated by root cuttings
That plant has large roots which are going deeper than normal plants and it will bring up to
its leafs high amounts of potassium phosphorus and other minor elements
Comparatively high protein amount in its leaves will turn to available nitrogen
Bocking 14 needs lots of water,can grow at wide temperature range and is not so picky about sun conditions either
That plant will stay put for decades where you will plant it and therefore it is good to decide
on a proper place for it to stay
I grow few dozens comfrey plants, which are vigorous growers and their leafs can be harvested few times a year
those leaves and flowers are a good feed for poultry , excellent for mulching
(that mulch will deteriorate quickly and provide plants and soil with good feed)
Other use for Comfrey leaves is making liquid fertilizer from them
there are few methods, the one I use is the same method used for alfalfa pellets

Alfalfa pellets
Alfalfa is an other protein rich plant which fixate nitrogen and therefore is sometime used as an inter crop plant to enrich the soil before starting cycle of demanding food crops
we used to grow alfalfa as a cattle feed in the past
Another greatness of Alfalfa plants is their production of Triacontanol in relatively high levels
Triacontanol is an natural growth hormone which increase division and density of plant cells
will thicken plants, stimulate basal breaks formation, and is also said to increase plants cold hardiness
Triacontanol affect few plants more than others, and is not yet clear why and how
Actually Triacontanol can be found in many plants at smaller amounts, and it presence
in beeswax is much more substantial than in alfalfa, however it is an fatty alcohol which is not soluble in water and will have the tendency to occur with other fatty alcohols which will Contradicts the positive impact on plants
It is thought that By fermentation process of Alfalfa Triacontanol will become available
for plants by roots or foliar applications,
From my own use of fermented Alfalfa as drench with Mango, Avocado, Grape wines, Tomatoes and few others It seems that during replanting and later growing the plants react very positive towards it
Take it As an tip

Alfalfa pellets are used as a feed for horses mainly, they are sold at 50 lb bags
and do not cost that much, something from $15

Fermentation:
in a big container far from you house (it stink)
fill two thirds with water and add
about One cup Alfalfa pellets per Gallon of water
give a daily stir from the second day on for about a week
cover the container since it stinks and attracts flies

Maybe that is the Durian fruit for plants stenchy but tasty
Apply as transplant drench from about half a Gallon for young small trees
use more for bigger trees
Or apply as an liquid fertilizer in spring and summer at the same rates

If for some reason you find that subject interesting, please google for it:
Alfalfa Triacontanol, Alfalfa Pellets Triacontanol, comfrey bocking 14, comfrey bocking 14 fertilizer

Don't blame me for anything and take care

Pancrazio

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2012, 12:27:55 PM »
I missed that post.
I think that kind of suggestion useful, mainly because, as others have pointed in other topics, this kind of fertilization isn't energy starved as some chemical fertilization is. So basically, is both economical and ecological.
Italian fruit forum

I want to buy/trade central asia apricots. Contact me in PM if interested.

tabbydan

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2012, 04:26:26 PM »
One really lazy green technique:

collect rainwater and bottle in a clear or translucent container, algae will grow and the algae will fix nitrogen from the air into amines that plants can use.

No where near as good as the alfalfa pellets or comfrey... but its a free green way to fertilize.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

Guanabanus

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2012, 08:25:33 PM »
Thank you, Amaqeq,
I had never heard of 'Bocking 14' Comfrey.  It sounds great.
Har

amaqeq

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2012, 09:00:01 AM »
Thank You Guanabanus & tabbydan
Was convinced that the topic already retired without any interest
Pancrazio resuscitate that post from the oblivion of second forum page

Here is one plant re growing his foliage after two haircuts that summer


Cluster under a fig tree experimenting its self mulching capabilities
in proximity to the tree, and as an weed barrier
The stick made out of dry palm frond was positioned there at spring time to show
me where not to step after planting that cluster


Ever renewing brew, Cmfrey leafs contain just small amount of fibers and decompose quickly, smells like fresh dung


In the bottle the ratio is 0.25 liquid fertilizer 0.75 water, it is used as a drench toward
the last third of irrigation
(The bottle is just used to show the intense green almost black color)


tabbydan

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2012, 05:16:56 PM »
Ever renewing brew, Cmfrey leafs contain just small amount of fibers and decompose quickly, smells like fresh dung

Yeah, but what does it taste like :)

I almost never use city water for my plants (better for them, better for the environment) so I use mainly rainwater, or rainwater that I passed through the pots but they didn't absorb, or old cooking water.  I was just pouring out a mix of water that my wife had boiled lobster in, and weeds that I allowed to ferment in the closed container...  smelled like a proprietary dung/vomit mix.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

fyliu

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2012, 05:55:09 PM »
I was reading about anaerobic decomposition a while back and I think it may help with the smell, or turn it into another smell. Just pour expired milk that contain lactobacillus into the anaerobic container and that's supposed to break things down pretty quickly. It's supposed to give things a yohgurt smell.

tabbydan

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2012, 06:20:45 PM »
Anerobic decomposition usually smells horrid.

Sulfur in the decaying substances is converted to thiols, mercaptans and such.  The human nose can pick up these things in the parts per billion range and they tend to smell awful (most random ones at least, coffee aroma, and durian aroma/taste, as well as garlic and onion flavor/smell come from these too).

I use empty milk gallons to hold rainwater and if there is more than a tiny trace of milk left the smell later on is pretty horrid.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

Guanabanus

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Re: Alfalfa pellets & comfrey bocking 14 In a nutshell
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2012, 08:02:59 PM »
To decrease bad smells one wants aerobic action, which can be had by using fish-tank bubblers in your brew vats;  add these BEFORE bad smells develop. 

Adding phosphatic clay (soft phosphate) or charcoal also helps.  (Hydrated lime also dampens smells well but ties up most nutrients.)
Har

 

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