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Author Topic: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...  (Read 2275 times)

red durian

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If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« on: September 24, 2012, 03:07:39 AM »



I have purchased them like this and ripe.  They are extremely difficult to peel when immature.  When mature, the peeling is easier, but not easy.  I made two products from the fruit, as it is too acidic to eat raw. 

The first was juice.  The juice had a beautiful pink colour and a good acid:sugar ratio was achieved, however, there was no real flavour or aroma and the acid still burned the tongue. 

The second product was a salt ferment done anaerobically.  It produced a decent pink pickle that we enjoyed  eating, but the effort to peel the small fruits and the small amount one ended up eating with a meal meant that if you had this tree, most of the fruits would be wasted.



Ethan

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2012, 04:17:41 AM »
Thank you Red Durian for the review about the Baccaurea lanceolata, it does not sound particularly good to eat.  Is it collected as a wild fruit or are people farming the fruits?  I've only tasted what might have been mislabeled B. dulcis, it was a little sour but not overly so and did have some aroma.

best wishes,
-Ethan

Gouralata

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2012, 04:58:38 AM »
Hi red Durian

thank you for the information cause I got this fruit two years ago in Miri but was anable to identify it. I confirm its very little interest.

Gouralata (Reunion Island)

PS; I got the mature fruits in Temparuli tamu and they were very very acid.

Mike T

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2012, 05:15:43 AM »
http://www.sarawaklens.com/2010/07/mulu-apple-finally-identified.html
Here is a few possibly including the same species from sarawak.I find the yellow fleshed tampoi interesting as the white fleshed variety appears in a few markets here from time to time.I have seen only 5 or 6 species cultivated around here and in Baccaurea home of Borneo there must be dozens of species. 

tabbydan

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2012, 06:41:58 AM »
Baccaurea are one genus I always wonder about.  I guess part of the reason they are so uncommon is that they tend to be on the acidic side of thing.

I had some rambai on my last trip to Indonesia (sadly they were underripe) and in Thailand in '05 I had one or two species.

Cool stuff!

------

When you bought the fruits did you find out how the locals made use of them?
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

red durian

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2012, 07:23:49 AM »
Thank you Red Durian for the review about the Baccaurea lanceolata, it does not sound particularly good to eat.  Is it collected as a wild fruit or are people farming the fruits?  I've only tasted what might have been mislabeled B. dulcis, it was a little sour but not overly so and did have some aroma.

best wishes,
-Ethan
It is collected as a wild fruit.

red durian

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2012, 07:50:22 AM »
http://www.sarawaklens.com/2010/07/mulu-apple-finally-identified.html
Here is a few possibly including the same species from sarawak.I find the yellow fleshed tampoi interesting as the white fleshed variety appears in a few markets here from time to time.I have seen only 5 or 6 species cultivated around here and in Baccaurea home of Borneo there must be dozens of species.


I have been confused about Baccaurea from Borneo to Java as there is so much variation within species, so many different names for the same species and 'false friends' (same name for different species).  I was hoping I could give up on this genus but then I had a good-tasting Baccaurea in Bogor, named  'dompyong'.  (see photo below)  It has a nice sweetness to acidity ratio and can be eaten out of hand like a langsat.  Unfortunately, I have been unable to find out what the species is.




red durian

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2012, 07:54:09 AM »
Baccaurea are one genus I always wonder about.  I guess part of the reason they are so uncommon is that they tend to be on the acidic side of thing.

I had some rambai on my last trip to Indonesia (sadly they were underripe) and in Thailand in '05 I had one or two species.

Cool stuff!

------

When you bought the fruits did you find out how the locals made use of them?



All I knew was that they ate them with salt.  Just putting salt on the fruit like a green mango was not pleasant so I did a ferment.  Maybe they do also.  I don't know.

tabbydan

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2012, 08:17:26 AM »
I have been confused about Baccaurea from Borneo to Java as there is so much variation within species, so many different names for the same species and 'false friends' (same name for different species).  I was hoping I could give up on this genus but then I had a good-tasting Baccaurea in Bogor, named  'dompyong'.  (see photo below)  It has a nice sweetness to acidity ratio and can be eaten out of hand like a langsat.  Unfortunately, I have been unable to find out what the species is.

Baccaurea IS very confusing.  Never give up on it though, I think this genus has some promise for underutilized gems.

What did you see in Bogor?  It seems to be a huge fruit hub.  They have the botanical gardens, Mekasari, a whole bunch of NGOs and some enthusiast growers there...
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

Mike T

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Re: If you're excited about getting Baccaurea lanceolata, read on...
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2012, 08:18:57 AM »
The one in the latest picture is not rambai (B.motleyana) or burmese grape (B.ramiflora) but it is in that group.B.racemosa,B.dulcis and B.kunstleri probably have a variety of forms and it could be hard to know which one it is unless you are a Baccaurea enthusiast.One farmer here has some eye popping B.macrocarpa that were sourced from Borneo.They are very large and sweet.

 

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