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Author Topic: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?  (Read 691 times)

zephian

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Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« on: April 08, 2018, 12:17:19 PM »
Good morning All!
Yesterday the wife and I were at the local nursery picking up our holiday avocado tree (yay) and saw that they have purple passion fruit and multi grafted cherries.
Our cherry tree (Bing) is on it's way out. It was planted in 94 by the previous homeowner and it's had alot of rot and dead limbs. This year I cut a very large section out and it's growing some nice cherries now but we want to start a cherry tree in a large pot now as we know this tree is past it's prime.
I have a few questions regarding Cherry tree and passion fruits.

Is there any downside to multi grafted trees? I believe they were Bing, Lapins, Van cherries. some had black tartarian. Are they safe to grow in pot for another year or two?
Do passion fruits grow well north of Sacramento? I believe I'm zone 9B (we have a few days that dip below 28 degrees or so. Would I need to grow this in a pot or would it be safe to plant in the ground now? I know the cold will kill back the vines and that they are VIGOROUS growers, does dying back completely to roots affect the harvest?

Any input will be appreciated. Trying to expand our garden currently. We've got Meyer lemons, Pluots, Pomellos, Bing Cherry, Limes, two persimmon variations, blue berries, Naval oranges, raspberries and our newest pomegranate and holiday avocado (Coming soon: GEM avocado!!)

Thanks and enjoy your weekend!
-Kris

barath

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2018, 01:12:27 AM »
If I remember right there are hillside areas of Yuba City that are not low lying -- is that right?  If you're up on a hill and get good cold air drainage I could imagine a mature Frederick Passionfruit vine surviving the winter for you.  Otherwise, you might consider grafting Frederick on a more cold hardy rootstock (Passiflora 'Betty Myles Young' is supposedly a good one for colder climates as a rootstock and doesn't sucker as much as P. caerulea).

SoCal2warm

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2018, 04:52:42 AM »
Many kinds of passiflora (passion flower vine) can grow just fine where you're at, but be sure to research the variety. If anything the problem may be making sure they get enough water in the Summer.
Probably the first year in the ground is the most difficult and if the vine is not healthy, the less cold hardy ones may not survive even a mild Winter. Even the more sensitive varieties, I'm guessing if you grow them they will only suffer minor damage, some years more than others.

Only downside of multi graft is that it may take some extra maintenance (skillful pruning) to make sure the base tree doesn't overgrow any of the graft varieties.

« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 05:09:15 AM by SoCal2warm »

zephian

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2018, 11:16:58 AM »
Many kinds of passiflora (passion flower vine) can grow just fine where you're at, but be sure to research the variety. If anything the problem may be making sure they get enough water in the Summer.
Probably the first year in the ground is the most difficult and if the vine is not healthy, the less cold hardy ones may not survive even a mild Winter. Even the more sensitive varieties, I'm guessing if you grow them they will only suffer minor damage, some years more than others.

Only downside of multi graft is that it may take some extra maintenance (skillful pruning) to make sure the base tree doesn't overgrow any of the graft varieties.
I live a stones throw from the river, (Exaggerated but a few minutes walk) so about as low as I can get in this area...
I believe the nursery had 'frederick' but I did not check if it was grafted. It was a plant with multiple stalks coming up and was about 6 feet tall already.

Many kinds of passiflora (passion flower vine) can grow just fine where you're at, but be sure to research the variety. If anything the problem may be making sure they get enough water in the Summer.
Probably the first year in the ground is the most difficult and if the vine is not healthy, the less cold hardy ones may not survive even a mild Winter. Even the more sensitive varieties, I'm guessing if you grow them they will only suffer minor damage, some years more than others.

Only downside of multi graft is that it may take some extra maintenance (skillful pruning) to make sure the base tree doesn't overgrow any of the graft varieties.


Thanks for the input, are there any good instructional videos or resources about this pruning you would recommend? I'm fairly new to growing anything but vegetables. Thanks!
-Kris

Bush2Beach

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2018, 12:13:57 PM »
Advice for you is to put the Cherries in the ground along with any other potted fruit tree's. They will not be happy when it is over 100 degree's in August /September.
Baby those Avocado's like your baby's. Put them in a protected place close to your home where they are not out of sight , out of mind at all. They will need extra care the first year when it is extremely hot in those months. They will not be very happy with the fact you have no slope and are at the bottom of a cold air sink basin. I would say plant a Mexicola or Stewart or something mostly Mexican and more hardy to your extremely questionable avocado growing zone but you already got your tree's so..... Plant something in front of them to protect from midday sun extremes that can be cut back to allow winter light, Like a quick growing Salvia.
For Passion fruit your best bet is probably going to be grafting onto P. Careula as recomended. Plant more Cherries and Olives and Capers and Nopales. Plants that are more automatic for your zone and require much less care. Good Luck!

zephian

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2018, 02:18:43 PM »
Thanks for the advice! Currently have my holiday avocado in a large pot with river rock lining the bottom and a potting mix + cactus/citrus potting mix+worm castings. It's right next to my porch and will be spending the next few days inside as after tomorrow we will be getting drenched in rain... again. I have already painted the trunk to protect against sunburn. Once I do put it in the ground though we will be placing it between two persimmon trees which allow for shade during the peak hours in summer, and being persimmons they drop their leaves every winter. I may end up not going with a passion fruit because I'm pretty limited on space. I have about 1/4 acre with several mature trees + more to come.
-Kris

zephian

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2018, 02:32:15 PM »
Don't have a good image editor as I'm at work but this is my current layout. X's are trees I will be removing or have removed (Trimmed back the bananas by about 60%, will remove palm, fruitless plums, Bay tree)
Just so you get a better idea where I plan on putting the avocado trees - between fuyu persimmon and the hachiya/cherry tree along that fence line.

-Kris

Bush2Beach

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2018, 07:32:29 PM »
Your yard is looking good, Thanks for the visual. Good plan for your Avocado, Holiday has a weeping growth habit.
The citrus and Banana's are a good micro climate indicator you can succeed. You could take advantage of an established root system and graft that fruitless plum with the stone fruit of your choice ( or the Pluot scion you already have) .

zephian

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Re: Passion Fruit and multi graft cherries - NorCal?
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2018, 11:02:11 AM »
Your yard is looking good, Thanks for the visual. Good plan for your Avocado, Holiday has a weeping growth habit.
The citrus and Banana's are a good micro climate indicator you can succeed. You could take advantage of an established root system and graft that fruitless plum with the stone fruit of your choice ( or the Pluot scion you already have) .
Thanks! I'm noticing that about the Holiday... It's like a wet noodle! It's currently 38 inches tall and I've only had it in a new pot for two days but It's loving it! Maybe it's the worm castings but it's got new growth already! The plum are very close to the fence and are at least 20 years years old, same with the palm tree next to it (Can't wait to remove that ugly tree) Seems like anything will grow in my backyard. The Pluot tree may be re homed to the original home owners next winter depending on if we like the fruit or not... We didn't try any last fruit set. My backyards a work in progress but we hope to have a good producing 'ring' around the grass in the center in the next few years.

Does anyone have a picture of their Holiday Avocado trees? I'm curious as to how they're growing for people in similar zones.
-Kris

 

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