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Author Topic: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom  (Read 760 times)

containerman

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The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« on: April 17, 2018, 09:48:41 AM »
I have the following trees in bloom all in containers.

Dwarf Washington Navel
Cara Cara
Moro Blood
Oroblanco
Kishu
Okitsu Wase Satsuma
Honey Mandarin
Tahoe Gold
Yosemite Gold
Shasta Gold
Gold Nugget
Variegated Pink Eureka Lemon
Meyer Lemon

The smell in the backyard is amazing this year. I have doubled my citrus trees since last season and now I'm content with my citrus collection.

brian

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2018, 02:39:44 PM »
Yup, I love the smell in my greenhouse during spring bloom.   

I had never heard of Okitsu Wase Satsuma until you mentioned it now.  From reading a bit, sounds like a great variety.   

ethane

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2018, 02:53:19 PM »
I love the smell of Citrus blossoms. I used to have a grove behind my backyard in Florida, which smelled amazing.

Also, Okitsu fruit are delicious.

Ethan

Millet

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2018, 03:22:14 PM »
Being  that the cross is nucellar seedling of Miyagawa from a controlled pollination with Poncirus trifoliata I'm surprised that it has such a sweet and pleasant taste due to the P.  trifoliate parentage.

Sylvain

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2018, 04:35:58 AM »
It is a nucellar seedling then no P.  trifoliate parentage.

Millet

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2018, 10:44:08 AM »
Sylvain , then basically Okitsu is not much more than another Miyagawa.

Ilya11

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2018, 02:50:26 PM »
Millet,
Okitsu comes from spontaneous  mutation event in Miaygawa genome. Mutated   nucellar seedlings is the quickest way to produce new satsuma  cultivars
https://fshs.org/proceedings-o/1964-vol-77/79-83%20(NISHIURA).pdf
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                       Ilya

SoCal2warm

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2018, 12:44:48 AM »
It's also possible it could have been a zygotic seedling as a result of self-pollination and sexual recombination.
Not that it matters.


I remember reading one study that found the seeds in Satsuma were 90 percent nucellar. (Frost and Soost, 1968 )
That means there's a moderately small probability you could get a zygotic seed.

Ilya11

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2018, 03:07:32 AM »
Pollination  of Miaygawa by poncirus  in this case was used in order to identify and discard possible zygotic hybrids (trifoliates).
Best regards,
                       Ilya

SoCal2warm

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2018, 04:31:29 PM »
Pollination  of Miaygawa by poncirus  in this case was used in order to identify and discard possible zygotic hybrids (trifoliates).
Too bad they couldn't have sent the seedling plants to someone else to grow them and evaluate their cold hardiness and fruit quality.

I read about all these interesting experiments where researchers took the time to make interesting hybridizations, but they weren't evaluating the offspring past the seedling stage so they just tossed them all out. Surely there would have been other people interested in those seedlings.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 04:33:37 PM by SoCal2warm »

containerman

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2018, 06:16:56 PM »
Take a look here it was the clear taste test winner

http://www.fruitmentor.com/okitsu-wase-satsuma


In a November 2014 citrus taste test of 60 varieties from California's central valley, the Okitsu Wase Satsuma was the overall winner. Tasters reported Okitsu Wase to be sweet with excellent flavor and very juicy. One taster also noted its fragrant skin. On a scale from 1 to 9, Okitsu Wase scored 7.3, a bit higher than “very good” (7).

Millet

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2018, 09:48:14 PM »
Argentina: 60-70% of Okitsu and Satsuma citrus lost due to drought

FamilyJ

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2018, 08:19:37 AM »
love smell of Citrus but hard here in florida to keep

SoCal2warm

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Re: The Fragrance of Citrus in Bloom
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2018, 05:00:38 PM »
Being  that the cross is nucellar seedling of Miyagawa from a controlled pollination with Poncirus trifoliata I'm surprised that it has such a sweet and pleasant taste due to the P.  trifoliate parentage.
If it's a nucellar seedling, then it wouldn't actually have any trifoliate ancestry.
In some cases, pollen from another citrus variety can induce fruit set, but those seeds in the fruit will not necessarily have genetically arisen from the genes in the pollen.

You might read the topic "What happens if you try to breed Triploid citrus" for further information.

"Nucellar" generally means the embryo arose from the surrounding seed coat (rather than the zygotic germoplasm) and is a genetic clone. Although of course sometimes there are mutations, and sometimes "nucellar" can (not completely technically correct use of the word) refer to multiple seedlings arising out of the same seed, even though sometimes one of the seedlings is zygotic (result of sexual recombination).
« Last Edit: July 10, 2018, 05:09:43 PM by SoCal2warm »

 

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