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Author Topic: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits  (Read 13599 times)

fruitlovers

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #25 on: September 26, 2012, 07:51:17 PM »
Don`t forget this baby: Mauritia flexuosa BTW, the raw taste reminded me a lot of olives...

The flesh of mocambo has not fat, but of course the seeds if you roast them ;)

Lots of palms have fruits that are very fatty. One of the fattiest i tasted is tucuma (Astrocaryum vulgare). But acai and buriti (M. flexuosa) are also very oily. Acai is made into a wonderful porridge like soup in Brazil. Very filling! Tastes like avocado with black olives mixed in.

Forgot to say, tucuma fruit is so oily it is commonly eaten as a sandwhich, kind of like spreading butter on your sandwich bread.
Oscar

bsbullie

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2012, 07:56:39 PM »
Craboo/nance Byrsonima crassifolia is a bit fatty.  I grew to love it in Belize.  Probably being grown in Florida in some gardens as it ranges up into Mexico naturally.  It is one of the most harvest-friendly fruits on the planet.

Nance is a very nice tasting fruit with unusual taste. In Brazil they make an excellent ice cream out of it. Was one of my favorites. Tree also very ornamental with very pretty flowers.
Nance is commonly grown, well maybe not commonly but it is grown, by some of the Central & South American community here in SFla.
- Rob

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #27 on: September 26, 2012, 07:57:00 PM »
thanks to all the lipid lovers that have been posting!

I'm loving it!  like makudonarudo.

bsbullie

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #28 on: September 26, 2012, 07:58:33 PM »
If you're in the market for fats I suggest a big Mac and fries for all the 'essential oils' you can handle.

Yes oils, and preservatives, hormones, antibiotics, artificial colorings, artificial flavorings, and genetically modified crops, herbicides, pesticides, miticides, soil fumigants. Then after that the meat is irradiated. Oh, would you like a dab of pink slime with that? You could call it a cocktail burger. HAHAHAHA
damn...there goes dinner  ;) ??? :P :-\ :blank:

Enjoy your McDonald's cocktail burger. A real molotov cocktail in your stomach! Bon apetit. 
For more information on McDonald's french fries watch the movie Supersize Me. Really great how their fries could stand on the cupboard for months without growing any mold on them! Even lower life forms are smart enough not to eat them. HAHAHA  Now if humans would wise up! ::)
Hope you know I was kidding...having braised Icelandic lamb shanks tonight for dinner.  Hmmm...think that is available on any MickeeDs menus?  ;) 8) ::) :P
- Rob

DurianLover

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2012, 03:00:09 AM »
Another fatty fruit is Dabai (tropical olive).  Taste just like avocado. Fruit is very appealing...However, seed to flesh ratio is disappointing (seed is much bigger than in regular olive), and skin is not eatable. I was told 3-5 generation chinese and indian "sarawakians" never adopted this fruit in their diets. However, native Malays buying them like crazy.

Btw, anyone growing it?


fruitlovers

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2012, 03:57:54 AM »
Another fatty fruit is Dabai (tropical olive).  Taste just like avocado. Fruit is very appealing...However, seed to flesh ratio is disappointing (seed is much bigger than in regular olive), and skin is not eatable. I was told 3-5 generation chinese and indian "sarawakians" never adopted this fruit in their diets. However, native Malays buying them like crazy.

Btw, anyone growing it?

I guess you are referring to Canarium odontophyllum? The seed is edible also, but not as large as with Pili Nut, C. ovatum. All the canrium fruits have oily exterior which can be eaten, but main prize is usually the nut.
Oscar

DurianLover

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #31 on: September 27, 2012, 06:08:03 PM »

[/quote]

I guess you are referring to Canarium odontophyllum? The seed is edible also, but not as large as with Pili Nut, C. ovatum. All the canrium fruits have oily exterior which can be eaten, but main prize is usually the nut.
[/quote]

Yes, the same fruit, but I really don't think people buying it for nut. Utilization of entire fruit is very time consuming. You have to peel it, than soak it in hot water (otherwise it's almoast as hard as tire rubber). And it is  hard nut to crack due to unusual shape. Than you have to start "fishing" with toothpick. Really how much nut can you pick up on the tip of the toothpick?:)  Nut is very soft like boiled peanut, but with better flavour.

fruitlovers

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #32 on: September 27, 2012, 06:55:57 PM »


I guess you are referring to Canarium odontophyllum? The seed is edible also, but not as large as with Pili Nut, C. ovatum. All the canrium fruits have oily exterior which can be eaten, but main prize is usually the nut.
[/quote]

Yes, the same fruit, but I really don't think people buying it for nut. Utilization of entire fruit is very time consuming. You have to peel it, than soak it in hot water (otherwise it's almoast as hard as tire rubber). And it is  hard nut to crack due to unusual shape. Than you have to start "fishing" with toothpick. Really how much nut can you pick up on the tip of the toothpick?:)  Nut is very soft like boiled peanut, but with better flavour.
[/quote]

Ok that's what i thought from the size of the dabai nut. I have some dabai trees growing here but haven't fruited yet. BTW, pili nut is nice large size and VERY tasty!
Oscar

nullzero

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #33 on: September 27, 2012, 07:18:46 PM »
I am surprised no one mentioned Dacryodes edulis yet. http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11879&page=61
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BMc

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #34 on: September 27, 2012, 07:40:12 PM »
was mentioned in the first reply.

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #35 on: September 27, 2012, 08:44:20 PM »
In hindsight after posting,I'm thinking that fruits of palm species will have good fat content in mesocarps of fruit.

so maybe we can also suggest some families of trees that typically have high lipid content.
 

o btw, I noticed muntingia calabura has a somewhat significant amount of fat, according to Julia Morton. 1.56 mg per 100 grams of edible fruit.

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #36 on: September 27, 2012, 08:46:15 PM »
sorry that's 1.56g not mg.

nullzero

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #37 on: September 27, 2012, 08:50:18 PM »
was mentioned in the first reply.

The webpage search function may have not worked correctly. I over looked it I guess  :-[.
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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2013, 07:59:25 PM »
How could I forget? Tucum.

Bactris setosa (the thorniest thing I've ever grown) has a very high fat content...43.7g per 100g of fruit.

The tree is cold tolerant (25F ?)can be grown in standing water, or on dry land if irrigated.  The acid/sweet fruits are similar to jaboticaba in appearance, and are eaten in the same way...with skins being discarded, after the pulp is consumed.

« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 08:11:58 PM by ASaffron »

fruitlovers

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2013, 10:49:27 PM »
Are those your Bactris setosa fruits in the photo? If so i want some seeds! I'm big on Bactris.  Love peach palm (pejibaye) fruits.
Oscar

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2013, 11:54:35 PM »
Are those your Bactris setosa fruits in the photo? If so i want some seeds! I'm big on Bactris.  Love peach palm (pejibaye) fruits.

Oscar!

I wish!

the tree I have might fruit this year if I'm lucky...
I just stepped it up into a 20gal pot, and it had the craziest roots ever...and I had to handle the tree like a pro wrestler, slamming it into the new pot, to avoid the hellacious thorns.

I will keep an eye out for seeds though...I think I know where a fruiting specimen is.

also...I'm not convinced yet about the fat content...my only source for nutritional info is Lorenzis book...and its got some errors.

if the nutritional info is accurate, bactris setosa has more fat than any other fruit profiled in the book...even more than coconuts and avocados...which is hard to believe.

im wondering if there is a way to find another source for nutritional info ?

roboto212

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #41 on: March 05, 2013, 10:42:32 PM »
My friend stubbed his foot on a thorn about 10 days ago... went straight in and he just got it out today! When I first saw the thorn I immediately thought of that picture of Bactris setosa :




Could the thorn that poked my friend possibly be the same/similar.

:

roboto212

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #42 on: March 05, 2013, 10:46:38 PM »
btw my friend was at a property called the Palm Farm, where he tells me there are alot of different kinds of palms growing on the property.

fruitlovers

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #43 on: March 05, 2013, 11:50:25 PM »
Tons of palms with thorns, not just Bactris.
Oscar

Sanddollarmoon

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #44 on: August 09, 2013, 11:05:37 PM »
Elaeocarpus, a tropical edible and ornamental genus, has it's own selection of oil-rich fruits, with one fruit being the Himalayan olive (elaeocarpus lanceifolius). Looking like an apple-sized green olive (tasting like one as well), and having a texture reminiscent to an avocado, these can be dried, pickled, and eaten fresh. I recently planted two pits, which look like three-lobed walnut.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2013, 03:22:17 PM by Sanddollarmoon »

Luisport

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #45 on: August 10, 2013, 08:24:04 AM »
Yes i agree, this fruits like avocado are very important to our body. I love dry fruits too like almonds, wallnuts, hazelnuts and macadamias

Mike T

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #46 on: August 10, 2013, 08:46:00 AM »
Did uxi and Lecythis get mentioned? I have seeds planted and it will be years before they can satisfy my love of lipids.

Luisport

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #47 on: August 10, 2013, 12:29:42 PM »
the breadfruit too i think

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #48 on: August 10, 2013, 04:00:25 PM »
Did uxi and Lecythis get mentioned? I have seeds planted and it will be years before they can satisfy my love of lipids.

sounds like you've been reviewing Brazilian Fruits and cultivated exotics...did you recently get a copy?

Uxi was the first fruit mentioned in this thread.

I wish I could grow it, but I'm afraid it's too large, and cold sensitive...but it would be worth growing just for the foliage.




Mike T

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #49 on: August 10, 2013, 06:23:38 PM »
Saff I was given the Lorenzi book and sought other interesting species as well as others. Suddenly I have about 50 species new to me in pots as seeds and emerging seedlings and some in good numbers. They include Annonas, Pouterias,Eugenias,jaboticabas,Garcinias and about a dozen other genera. I just received camu camu but M.tenella is the missing one.
I don't have room.

 

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