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Author Topic: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits  (Read 13598 times)

fruitlovers

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #75 on: March 09, 2019, 01:14:48 AM »
Coyo and Anay look like good avocado substitutes to broaden the diet!
Is anyone growing Beilschmiedia anay and have seed available?
Oscar

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #76 on: March 10, 2019, 12:20:36 PM »
i have fruited Tucum, and i believe there is no way possible the fat content is in the pulp.

it must be in the seed embryo, the proper way to enjoy them is to let them get full sized and green, then you can split them open and eat the inside of the seed, which is similar in texture/taste to coconut.

I guess there's some shit you just can't find in a book...it's up to some asshole like me to figure it out, and then post it here.

Acacia

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #77 on: March 10, 2019, 06:02:13 PM »
i have fruited Tucum, and i believe there is no way possible the fat content is in the pulp.

it must be in the seed embryo, the proper way to enjoy them is to let them get full sized and green, then you can split them open and eat the inside of the seed, which is similar in texture/taste to coconut.

I guess there's some shit you just can't find in a book...it's up to some asshole like me to figure it out, and then post it here.

Maybe inside the seed is the higher fat content. A study says the pulp has a similar fat, protein and carb content to human milk putting it at 3-5% fat.

Acacia

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #78 on: March 10, 2019, 06:13:49 PM »
gustavia macarenensis, engkala, avocado, durian, olive, dabai, ackee, safou, aguaje, dacryodes rostrata, pangium edule, I think this is all I have for now. Recently searching for fatty fruits also because pleasure found in ackee, durian, gustavia, avocado etc.

Let the hunt continue!

Gustavia macarenensis another fatty fruit!

"The fruit (G. macarenensis) is of medium size
and the collected samples had an average weight
of 258 g. The rind is tough and thick and is lilac to
brownish in color mixed with some green shades.
When ripe, the fruit is easily split and usually contains four to six seeds embedded in a yellowish
edible pulp which is soft and sweet with an exquisite odor much liked by the local people of the
Ecuadorian Amazonian basin.
The proximate analysis of the fruit pulp and
the physical-chemical properties of the oil extracted
from the mesocarp of G. macarenensis are summarized in Table 2.
As can observed in Table 2, the G. macarenensis
fruit mesocarp contains a high value for total lipids (53.57%), which is uncommon for fruit pulp,
as it usually contains very low levels of lipid material (0.1 to 1.0%). A few notable exceptions are
avocado, palm fruit and olives, which range from
6.525.5%, 874% and 3570%, respectively (Kamel
and Kakuda, 2007). These are recognized as being
sources of natural oils and as having several applications."

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/R_Naranjo/publication/330967394_Chemical_characterization_fatty_acid_profile_and_antioxidant_activity_of_Gustavia_macarenensis_fruit_mesocarp_and_its_oil_from_the_Amazonian_region_of_Ecuador_as_an_unconventional_source_of_vegetable_/links/5c5d87d8a6fdccb608afc7a7/Chemical-characterization-fatty-acid-profile-and-antioxidant-activity-of-Gustavia-macarenensis-fruit-mesocarp-and-its-oil-from-the-Amazonian-region-of-Ecuador-as-an-unconventional-source-of-vegetable.pdf?origin=publication_detail

Acacia

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #79 on: March 10, 2019, 06:36:13 PM »
Grias Peruviana (Sachamangua) is related to Gustavia and Brazil nuts.

"The mesocarp of the large single-seeded fruit is eaten raw. Soaking it in water softens the mesocarp to an agreeable texture. It is sold as a snack on the streets of Iquitos. The fruit can also be roasted, which softens the mesocarp into a butter-like texture."

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #80 on: March 10, 2019, 07:17:25 PM »
i have fruited Tucum, and i believe there is no way possible the fat content is in the pulp.

it must be in the seed embryo, the proper way to enjoy them is to let them get full sized and green, then you can split them open and eat the inside of the seed, which is similar in texture/taste to coconut.

I guess there's some shit you just can't find in a book...it's up to some asshole like me to figure it out, and then post it here.

Maybe inside the seed is the higher fat content. A study says the pulp has a similar fat, protein and carb content to human milk putting it at 3-5% fat.

i tasted the pulp, it was all water and carbs, no oil

Guanabanus

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #81 on: March 10, 2019, 07:42:06 PM »
"Better-Than-Butter-Fruits":  two species:  Poraqueiba paraensis, Yellow Umari' , from the lower Amazon region, State of Para'.  And Poraqueiba sericea, Black Mari', from the central Amazon region, the State of Amazonas.  Both are delicious, eaten out of hand, or scraped and spread on cassava flatbread or on French bread or crackers.  The skin is soft and edible, and the 1/4-inch or less of yellow pulp is creamy and very oily.  The underpulp is usually not eaten, but it is edible--- chewy and somewhat fibrous, and a little bitter.  Below that is the very hard seedcoat.
Har

Guanabanus

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Re: A Fascination with Fatty Fruits
« Reply #82 on: March 10, 2019, 07:56:02 PM »
The Pequi', Caryocar brasiliensis, is a bushy small tree in the Cerrado scrublands of central Brazil.  Canned Pequi' meats are available in some ethnic supermarkets in southern Florida.
The Pequia', Caryocar villosum, is a huge hardwood tree in the Amazonian rainforest, where each fruiting tree was a guarded, prized possession of any tribal clan.  Unfortunately, others have valued the trees as lumber.

Both fruits are eaten cooked--- nowadays, usually boiled.  The deep yellow-orange pulp has a powerful, distinctive,  nutty flavor, with lots of orange oil.  It is often boiled in rice, to provide flavor and oil and bright color.
Har

 

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