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Author Topic: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?  (Read 1307 times)

KarenRei

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Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« on: May 13, 2018, 09:13:03 AM »
I'm curious, who here (who sells live plants) is under phytosanitary control and certified for their export?  I know a number of people here as seed sellers (and have purchased from some before), but have not previously had need to purchase live plants so have not looked into it.  I'd much rather to purchase from people here than from elsewhere  :)

In general, we can import pretty much anything tropical.  E.g. nobody's worried about the "Icelandic citrus industry" being hurt by citrus psyllid or about strawberry guava becoming invasive or whatnot  ;)
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KarenRei

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2018, 11:44:39 AM »
Hmm, nobody?  That would quite surprise me.
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KarenRei

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2018, 05:00:04 AM »
ED: also, apparently these exceptions apply to EU people:

Quote
May individuals take with them plants in their luggage or send them in the mail to the country without a certificate?

Yes, individuals or tourists may take with them the following plants or plant parts without having a health certificate accompany them, and the same applies to sending in the mail between countries, often called carry-on rules:

A bouquet with cut flowers and branches (up to 25 plants)
Bulbs, roots and tubers from Europe in unopened store packaging (up to 2kg)
Individual potted plants (indoor plants) from Europe (up to 3 units)
When migrating from a country in Europe it is permitted to take with potted plants (indoor plants) which are appropriate as normal household items  (up to 30 units).

It shall be pointed out that these exceptions do not apply to wild plants which have been harvested in the countryside, trees (with or without roots) including dwarf trees (bonsai) and potatoes. It's necessary to keep in mind that these exceptions do not apply to species that are banned from import in accordance with appendix III.

So, EU people can send cuttings and herbaceous plants without a permit  :) 

Oh... hey... thought just hit me. All of the EU overseas territories are in the EU!  Meaning they can send cuttings and herbaceous plants without a permit!  This includes:

Canary Islands
La RÚunion
Guadeloupe
Martinique
Madeira
French Guiana
Azores
Ponta Delgada
Mayotte
St Martin
French Polynesia
New Caledonia
Curašao
Aruba
Bermuda
Cayman Islands
Greenland
Sint Maarten
Turks and Caicos Islands
British Virgin Islands
Bonaire
Anguilla
Wallis-et-Futuna
Saint BarthÚlemy
Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon
Montserrat
Brades
Saint Helena
Falkland Islands
Sint Eustatius
Saba
Pitcairn Islands
French Southern and Antarctic Lands

Of these, the British territories (Bermuda, Cayman Islands, Turks and Caicos, British Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Montserrat, Saint Helena, Falkland Islands, Pitcairn Islands), about a third of the total, may or may not be leaving the EU area, depending on whether Britain ends up with a "soft" or "hard" brexit.  Regardless, there's a lot of tropical territory in there!  En argggh, too bad they still require a permit for "trees" and "dwarf trees"  :Ů  Basically, nothing lignaceous comes with a rootstock without a permit.  But if it's a rootable branch, it can fall in the bouquet exception.  And roots can be purchased without a permit if they come from a store and are in unopened packaging.  Haha, you know, basically any store could take a  small tree, cut it at ground level, package the roots, and send both parts to be re-grafted, without needing a permit  ;)  Maybe bundling the top part with a couple roses just to make sure that the clipping doesn't run afoul of the bouquet exception  ;)

Obviously, though, permits are best.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2018, 05:27:42 AM by KarenRei »
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Grapebush

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2018, 05:51:18 AM »
Wich plants are you searching for?


I don't have phytosanitary certification, but I can make the plants being inspected, by appointment with the local phytosanitary services. It might take some time, and it has additional costs, but can be done.
Also I'm in EU.
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KarenRei

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2018, 05:56:21 AM »
Wich plants are you searching for?


I don't have phytosanitary certification, but I can make the plants being inspected, by appointment with the local phytosanitary services. It might take some time, and it has additional costs, but can be done.
Also I'm in EU.

Excellent.  Right now I'm just trying to get a list of potential suppliers, as when we go through the candidate lists, Hj÷rdÝs is always (quite rightfully!) asking, "How long does that take to produce?" and "Can we speed it up by getting plants rather than seeds?"  It's always tricky, because the best I can usually respond is "probably", "maybe", "probably not", or "I'll get back to you".  :Ů
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Future

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2018, 01:18:14 PM »
Iĺm in Bermuda so if we have what you want and you want to buy me a plane ticket...

KarenRei

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2018, 02:59:12 PM »
Iĺm in Bermuda so if we have what you want and you want to buy me a plane ticket...

Hey, if you can get a phyto, trading a plane ticket for bringing a suitcase or two of plants would probably be a pretty fair deal  :)  (Without a phyto, it'd be limited to one "bouquet", 3 herbaceous plants, and one bag of store-packaged roots). Though the bouquet could be up to 25 "branches"....
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Future

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2018, 06:21:00 PM »
Jokes aside, I donĺt know that anyone is ôcertified for exportö in that agencies inspect per the importers permit conditions and issue certificates, not the seller.  Anybody can export if your local agency gives it the ok.

KarenRei

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2018, 06:34:40 PM »
Interesting. I was under the impression that there was an ongoing process for growers, but reading through the APHIS site, it actually appears to only be something that has to be done when there's a batch of plants to export.
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fruitlovers

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2018, 08:42:22 PM »
Anybody can apply for a phyto sanitary certificate. But if you have a registered nursery it is easier to know how to apply for it, where to get it, and how to be succesful in doing so. Plants need to be in stermile medium or bare rooted to get a phyto.
Are you sure your country requires a phyto? Some countries will inspect plants on entry and no prior phyto is required. (The USA used to be like that until about 20 years ago.)
Oscar

KarenRei

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Re: Forum members with phytosanitary certification?
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2018, 12:21:27 PM »
Anybody can apply for a phyto sanitary certificate. But if you have a registered nursery it is easier to know how to apply for it, where to get it, and how to be succesful in doing so. Plants need to be in stermile medium or bare rooted to get a phyto.
Are you sure your country requires a phyto? Some countries will inspect plants on entry and no prior phyto is required. (The USA used to be like that until about 20 years ago.)

Yes, unfortunately.  Apart from the exceptions, the regulations require:

Quote
Einungis er heimilt er a­ flytja inn eftirfarandi pl÷ntur e­a pl÷ntuafur­ir ef ■eim fylgir opinbert pl÷ntuheilbrig­isvottor­ (Phytosanitary certificate) frß ˙tflutningslandinu sem er ekki eldra en 14 daga mi­a­ vi­ ˙tflutningsdag:

Pl÷ntur me­ rˇt e­a pl÷ntuhlutar s.s. grŠ­lingar, blˇmlaukar, st÷ngul- & rˇtarnhř­i o.fl.
FrŠ og vatnapl÷ntur Štla­ar Ý fiskab˙r eru ■ˇ undanskilin.
Afskorin blˇm og greinar.
Rˇtarlaus barrtrÚ og barrtrjßgreinar frß Evrˇpu (ath. innflutningsbann ß řmsum ŠttkvÝslum).
Trjßvi­ me­ berki, me­ og ßn rˇtar (ath. innflutningsbann).
Kart÷flur (Solanum tuberosum).
Mold.

Which is:

Quote
Its only permissible to import the following plants or plant products if they're accompanied by an official plant health certificate (Phytosanitary certificate) from the exporting country which is no older than 14 days before the export date:

Plants with roots or plant parts, particularly cuttings, bulbs, stalks, rhizomes, etc
Seeds and water plants intended for aquariums are however excepted
Cut flowers and branches
Rootless conifers and conifer branches from Europe (note: there is an import ban on several genera).
Tree wood with bark, with or without roots (note: import ban)
Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum).
Soil

The Europe exceptions allow for a "bouquet" (up to 25  flowers or cut branches (without roots)), roots still sealed in shop packaging, and up to 3 herbaceous plants, without a phyto.  And of course you can just import seeds by filling out a form, it's trivial (I've actually bought from you a couple times in the past  ;)  Never any problems with the import, MAST has always been very helpful ).  But of course seeds usually take years to reach maturity.  We're going to be meeting later this week to decide how much money we want to allocate to plants of different sizes; it's not just a productivity issue, but also an issue of not having the place look barren for the first several years.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2018, 12:27:50 PM by KarenRei »
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