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Author Topic: Historic marang  (Read 960 times)

DurianLover

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Historic marang
« on: May 13, 2018, 08:17:22 PM »
One of my most anticipated trees finally opened its bank account. This could be historic tree. Almost 100% sure it is first fruiting marang in Sri Lanka and possibly on entire Indian subcontinent. I know there are good number of young trees in Kerala, but to my knowledge none fruited yet.
I heard various time frames for first fruiting anywhere from five to nine years, but this fellow did it in 3.5 years since planting as tiny two footer. It grows at least twice as fast as my other marang trees. Not sure why is that. If this is genetic trait, perhaps offsprings are worth cultivating.
Also, I may have been too aggressive with pruning. Young tree was bushy and crowded, so a lot of new branches drifted downwards trying to make U turn around branches above while seeking the sun. Now I got a bunch of fruits almost touching the ground. Easy night time snack for a wildlife  :)




Rob P

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2018, 08:47:03 PM »
This tree may not be a Marang (Artocarpus odorissimus), but another Artocarpus species or hybrid as leaf shape is not typical for that species.

Ethan

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2018, 10:01:28 PM »
Wow DL, how exciting! It is better to prune it too much and be able to reach the fruits than have  monster that rains down rotten fruit!


fruitlovers

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2018, 03:11:15 AM »
This tree may not be a Marang (Artocarpus odorissimus), but another Artocarpus species or hybrid as leaf shape is not typical for that species.
As with most artocarpus genus, there is a lot of variation in leaf shape and size from juvenille to adult leaves. There is also a lot of variation in different varieties. Looks like marang to me.
Oscar

fruitlovers

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2018, 03:12:11 AM »
Congrats! That's very fast for a marang. Is that from seed you got from me of the odorless type marang?
Oscar

aroideana

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2018, 08:35:41 AM »
Looks just like cv. that has proved to be very fast bearing here in tropical north Qld .
Keeping trees short has proved to help speed up and ease harvest ..

3 years is about right ..

DurianLover

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2018, 07:58:03 PM »
Wow DL, how exciting! It is better to prune it too much and be able to reach the fruits than have  monster that rains down rotten fruit!

Thanks Ethan  ;D ;). I'm actually more exited about this fruit becoming widely adopted in a new country rather than my own tree fruiting.

DurianLover

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2018, 07:59:10 PM »
This tree may not be a Marang (Artocarpus odorissimus), but another Artocarpus species or hybrid as leaf shape is not typical for that species.

Rob, this tree is grown from seed which I brought myself from Kota Kinabalu, Borneo. I ate mother fruit. I selected the seed for fruit quality and size. Before than I had dozen marangs from various sources. Chances that I misidentified mother fruit are virtually zero.
Looking at Googles images of fruiting marang trees leaves are indeed can different sometimes. I can see why you make that claim.

Common persisting misconception out there that all those rare artocarpus species are clones of one another. However they are variable, some are highly variable within species. So no surprise some would have slightly different leaf shape.  This seen across other species. For example, some mango varieties leaves would be be pale green, narrow, leaf edge in a wave pattern.  Others dark glossy green, big and wide, straight edge. Both would still be "mangifera indica" no matter what.

DurianLover

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2018, 08:03:34 PM »
Congrats! That's very fast for a marang. Is that from seed you got from me of the odorless type marang?

I mentioned above, not from you, but I still want to get your strain eventually. By the way, looking at google images of fruiting marangs, your tree has most distinctive leaves. Smaller and rounded shape. But, I have no doubt you are growing genuine marang  :).

DurianLover

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2018, 08:05:48 PM »
Looks just like cv. that has proved to be very fast bearing here in tropical north Qld .
Keeping trees short has proved to help speed up and ease harvest ..

3 years is about right ..

That's interesting. I think you confirmed my suspicion that some strains indeed grow and fruit noticeably faster.

Stevo

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2018, 05:58:50 AM »
Looks just like cv. that has proved to be very fast bearing here in tropical north Qld .
Keeping trees short has proved to help speed up and ease harvest ..

3 years is about right ..

Do you know the cultivar name as I have seedlings that were just identified as from Borneo or from the Philipines

Mike T

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2018, 07:53:15 AM »
It looks like marang to me and they vary a lot in fruit, leaf and growth characteristics. I don't think there are named cultivars just different local selections.

fruitlovers

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2018, 12:19:06 AM »
It looks like marang to me and they vary a lot in fruit, leaf and growth characteristics. I don't think there are named cultivars just different local selections.
I've heard there are named cultivars in the Phillippines of marang.
Oscar

tropical66

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2018, 02:37:51 AM »
 Wow....congrats
There is nothing more beautiful than PEACE - Unite All Mankind.

Rob P

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2018, 03:42:46 AM »
A couple of photos of my tree for comparison.




Mike T

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2018, 05:24:10 AM »
Wow Rob I didn't think any in the southern half of the continent were that big or thriving at all. If marang can do that well maybe a few other typically tropical species might do alright on your spread as well.

Rob P

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Re: Historic marang
« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2018, 01:20:11 AM »
Mike T I have a fairly good micro-climate in the little valley where I live, but I think just as important is my soil type a red/brown volcanic clay loam. I am about to plant out more Artocarpus species, but like Marang only species that are found from the lowlands up to 1300M or more that can handle the lower mean average temperatures of my Sub-tropical winters.

 

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