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Author Topic: Chinese bayberry  (Read 1508 times)

EvilFruit

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Chinese bayberry
« on: May 27, 2018, 08:17:49 AM »
Hi,

Just got some fresh Chinese bayberry from the local Asian supermarket. Hopefully the fruits are not irradiated because they taste so damn good and they are almost as big as a golf ball.

Any idea how to germinate these seeds ?. 

Thanks
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 08:21:24 AM by EvilFruit »
Moh'd

EvilFruit

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2018, 05:37:45 PM »
The cultivar name is "Dong Kui" Chinese Bayberry. The taste is quite unique, i will say it taste like a "melonish" Kiwi ;D (watermelon + kiwi) with a hint of mulberry, very pleasant to eat.

Here is the box I got (not my picture).



Moh'd

Caesar

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2018, 06:05:04 PM »
You piqued my interest. Apparently, it's a dioecious nitrogen-fixing tree, but I don't know if the commercial cultivars require a male pollinator (┐pollenizer?) or not. Tradewinds Fruit states they are difficult and slow to sprout (http://tradewindsfruit.com/myrica-rubra-yumberry-seeds).

I tried looking for a retailer of named varieties, but there don't seem to be any stateside. I found one in China that ships worldwide... No idea if it's trustworthy, but I'm tempted to place an order. It'd be better if they put the prices in the actual page, though. They have 4 named varieties, with their qualities listed in-page, but there's no mention of a pollenizer. One of them is the Dong Kui you mentioned. Jason Nursery: this is their link (http://www.fruit-trees-nursery.com/myrica_rubra.htm#sthash.go2Trng7.xnU5AEk6.dpbs).

EvilFruit

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2018, 05:36:55 PM »
You piqued my interest. Apparently, it's a dioecious nitrogen-fixing tree, but I don't know if the commercial cultivars require a male pollinator (┐pollenizer?) or not. Tradewinds Fruit states they are difficult and slow to sprout (http://tradewindsfruit.com/myrica-rubra-yumberry-seeds).

I tried looking for a retailer of named varieties, but there don't seem to be any stateside. I found one in China that ships worldwide... No idea if it's trustworthy, but I'm tempted to place an order. It'd be better if they put the prices in the actual page, though. They have 4 named varieties, with their qualities listed in-page, but there's no mention of a pollenizer. One of them is the Dong Kui you mentioned. Jason Nursery: this is their link (http://www.fruit-trees-nursery.com/myrica_rubra.htm#sthash.go2Trng7.xnU5AEk6.dpbs).


They don't seem to accept Paypal. You could easily get tricked.

Anyway, I gave this fruit to other people that I know. All of them seems to recognize the kiwi flavor and everyone agrees that it is a great fruit to have.

If you want to compare Chinese bayberry to other Chinese fruits like kiwi, lychee and loquat in "must have list". i will say it just right below lychee and kiwi, and above loquat by a little, in my opinion.

Thanks for links
« Last Edit: May 28, 2018, 05:38:56 PM by EvilFruit »
Moh'd

Waiting

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2018, 05:43:49 PM »
Someone here in the US has dubbed them "Yumberry". Isn't that cute?

shaneatwell

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2018, 11:12:56 AM »
Search the forum for yangmei or myrica rubra. lots of history here.
Shane

Tropheus76

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2018, 12:01:37 PM »
Many of us have been hunting seedlings in the States for years knowing seeds rarely if ever sprout. Hey EvilFruit, I am currently right down the road from you in Abu Dhabi. Where did you find the fruit? Really tempted to try and get some fruit before I leave and bring the fresh seeds back with me. Unfortunately that will still leave me in the beginning of Winter when I can pot them so it might be a wasted effort.

shaneatwell

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2018, 12:13:16 PM »
You mean seedlings of named varieties right? Cause if you're talking any old Yangmei then you can make up for the low germination rate by buying seeds by the pound.

I have a healthy BiQi seedling from Rtried, but likely a male based on leaf symmetry. 7' tall. Tried grafting this year for the first time and was not successful.
Shane

Tropheus76

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2018, 02:46:10 PM »
I think at this point most of us here in the States would be happy to get any variety, named or not if it was a seedling. So weird that such a requested and sought after tree is relatively unobtainable. Congrats on your success. You are one of the few people who seem to have gotten lucky on the seed route. Where are you getting that much seed from?

--BTW Is Jason Nursery the place that doesn't take paypal? They have a neat selection of many cool trees but I wonder about the safety of ordering trees from China.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2018, 04:39:20 PM by Tropheus76 »

shaneatwell

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2018, 04:36:55 PM »
The seedling I mentioned was giving to me, but I was able separately to germinate seeds from Sheffields. They later died after transplantation. I've found that all my myricas are quite susceptible to something near the ground (seedlings and lower leaves of my larger plant being most effected). My suspicion is phytophthera ramorum.

I notice that sheffields page now mentions the collection locale as in Zhejiang China where there is coincidentally a yumberry juice factory!

https://sheffields.com/seeds/Myrica/rubra
Shane

EvilFruit

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2018, 04:49:25 PM »
Many of us have been hunting seedlings in the States for years knowing seeds rarely if ever sprout. Hey EvilFruit, I am currently right down the road from you in Abu Dhabi. Where did you find the fruit? Really tempted to try and get some fruit before I leave and bring the fresh seeds back with me. Unfortunately that will still leave me in the beginning of Winter when I can pot them so it might be a wasted effort.

First, try to find Chinese bayberry in some of the Chinese supermarkets in Abu Dhabi. Call them and ask them for red bayberry.

click on the link for Chinese supermarkets in Abu Dhabi
https://goo.gl/XxcyMy

Here is where I got it.

wenzhou supermarket (location)

https://goo.gl/ro2M5G
Moh'd

EvilFruit

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2018, 05:11:08 PM »
The seedling I mentioned was giving to me, but I was able separately to germinate seeds from Sheffields. They later died after transplantation. I've found that all my myricas are quite susceptible to something near the ground (seedlings and lower leaves of my larger plant being most effected). My suspicion is phytophthera ramorum.

I notice that sheffields page now mentions the collection locale as in Zhejiang China where there is coincidentally a yumberry juice factory!

https://sheffields.com/seeds/Myrica/rubra


Chinese bayberry enjoy acidic soil and very well drained soil.

Some info I found in the web

Quote
Regarding soils, they like slightly acid 4 - 5.5pH.  They are growing very well on the red earth soil type at Maroochy Research Station and are virtually leaping out of the ground.  I think that is slightly acid, very well drained and very fertile.
It comes from China particularly in Zheijiang Province, grows on low mountains and likes high humidity around fruiting and it is a very attractive tree.  It has been grown over there and selected in China for many centuries.  The wild types are almost inedible so one has to be very careful when trying to bring a product like that into the marketplace.

This is the sort of climate that it grows in: minimum temperature about -4░C, maximum around 40░C; so it is very tolerant to a wide range of temperatures, but the average is a fairly pleasant 18░C.  It likes fairly high rainfall, particularly around fruit development.  If this fruit is not matured at high humidity it has a prickly mouth feel, so picking the best areas to grow it in Australia is a little bit tricky.


http://stfc.org.au/myrica-rubra-the-red-bayberry
Moh'd

Tropheus76

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2018, 08:55:18 PM »
Those conditions sound perfect for Central FL. Definitely going to try and sneak away to some markets when they let us off post. So much to do and see.

mygc

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Re: Chinese bayberry
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2018, 10:27:33 AM »
For those who successfully germinated Myrica rubra, what did you do? Do the seeds need stratification?

 

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