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Author Topic: Rollinia Problems  (Read 9759 times)

Mr. Clean

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Rollinia Problems
« on: September 30, 2012, 07:44:58 PM »
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« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 02:13:06 PM by Mr. Clean »
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cbss_daviefl

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2012, 08:19:06 PM »
Spider mites is my guess.  Organicide or neem oil show that they can take care of them.
Brandon

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2012, 09:01:50 PM »
Yes probably spider mites. They hate high moisture, so keep the plants wet. Give the leaves a frequent shot with the hose.
Oscar

amaqeq

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2012, 09:26:39 PM »
cbss_daviefl is right
maybe you can see them traveling where the web is thin
Oscar do not need my approval but I second his water hose suggestion
Just because it works


fruitlovers

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2012, 09:40:13 PM »
Warning: mites can be very difficult to get rid off once they have set up house. The abundant webbing shows you already have high population. So you need to really keep after them with sprays and hosing off.
Oscar

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2012, 01:51:54 AM »
I am envious! Lol

Rollinia plants are next to impossible to find in california.. I was lucky enough to purchase a seedling from a friend.. unfortunately.. I damaged it while playing ball with my  dog..  OOPS... but it has budded out from the broken stem and is making a recovery.. thankfully..

I had also ordered over 20  Rollinia seeds. Only one Germinated I'm calling it Lucky Rollinia.. the rest were moldy duds!!...

Mr. Clean

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2012, 08:02:40 AM »
Thank you for your insights; I will start spraying Neelam Oil.
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Mr. Clean

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2012, 08:42:12 AM »
I am envious! Lol

Rollinia plants are next to impossible to find in california.. I was lucky enough to purchase a seedling from a friend.. unfortunately.. I damaged it while playing ball with my  dog..  OOPS... but it has budded out from the broken stem and is making a recovery.. thankfully..

I had also ordered over 20  Rollinia seeds. Only one Germinated I'm calling it Lucky Rollinia.. the rest were moldy duds!!...

Sorry to hear about the doggy damage to your tree.  I learned not to use a retractible leash with my dog in my yard; he wraped the leash around a small mango tree and pulled it down.  I've never eaten a Rollinia fruit, so I'm looking forward to it someday. 
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110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

Guanabanus

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2012, 10:17:04 AM »
Yes, Water-Sprayed-Hard-to-the-Undersides-of -Leaves, is a pesticide, and, so far, you don't need to buy labeled water to use! 

First, while it is dry, you might want to manually brush off most of the webbing.

Mix soap with your neem oil.
Har

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2012, 10:19:38 AM »
I am envious! Lol

Rollinia plants are next to impossible to find in california.. I was lucky enough to purchase a seedling from a friend.. unfortunately.. I damaged it while playing ball with my  dog..  OOPS... but it has budded out from the broken stem ainnd is making a recovery.. thankfully..

I had also ordered over 20  Rollinia seeds. Only one Germinated I'm calling it Lucky Rollinia.. the rest were moldy duds!!...

Sorry to hear about the doggy damage to your tree.  I learned not to use a retractible leash with my dog in my yard; he wraped the leash around a small mango tree and pulled it down.  I've never eaten a Rollinia fruit, so I'm looking forward to it someday.
I hope you got a good cultivar of Rollinia cause otherwise you will waste a lot of time, effort and space.  I am sure there are good ones though the two I have tried have been off putting taste wise with the texture of, well, snot for a better term.
- Rob

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2012, 10:28:24 AM »
I am envious! Lol

Rollinia plants are next to impossible to find in california.. I was lucky enough to purchase a seedling from a friend.. unfortunately.. I damaged it while playing ball with my  dog..  OOPS... but it has budded out from the broken stem ainnd is making a recovery.. thankfully..

I had also ordered over 20  Rollinia seeds. Only one Germinated I'm calling it Lucky Rollinia.. the rest were moldy duds!!...

Sorry to hear about the doggy damage to your tree.  I learned not to use a retractible leash with my dog in my yard; he wraped the leash around a small mango tree and pulled it down.  I've never eaten a Rollinia fruit, so I'm looking forward to it someday.
I hope you got a good cultivar of Rollinia cause otherwise you will waste a lot of time, effort and space.  I am sure there are good ones though the two I have tried have been off putting taste wise with the texture of, well, snot for a better term.

If its the one he purchased from me its a seedling of a known good fruiting tree from Gary Zill.  Are there any known grafted varieties available for sale in South Florida?

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2012, 10:59:37 AM »
Most of these snotty textured fruits that have an off putting flavor, were eaten too late.

You must harvest and consume the fruit while still slightly firm and green.

This changes the story completely.  I've eaten fruits from the same tree, and the ones allowed to turn completely yellow were off putting and mushy.

I have got a grafted rollinia (I'm not quite sure of the source for the tree), but the leaves look quite different than the trees I've got flowering now.

I think there definitely are varieties out there, just not many grafting them.

Don't worry too much about getting a tasty fruited tree, all of the trees I've got fruits from tasted great.  Just plant a seed from a tasty fruit, and you should end up with something quite similar.



I am envious! Lol

Rollinia plants are next to impossible to find in california.. I was lucky enough to purchase a seedling from a friend.. unfortunately.. I damaged it while playing ball with my  dog..  OOPS... but it has budded out from the broken stem ainnd is making a recovery.. thankfully..

I had also ordered over 20  Rollinia seeds. Only one Germinated I'm calling it Lucky Rollinia.. the rest were moldy duds!!...

Sorry to hear about the doggy damage to your tree.  I learned not to use a retractible leash with my dog in my yard; he wraped the leash around a small mango tree and pulled it down.  I've never eaten a Rollinia fruit, so I'm looking forward to it someday.
I hope you got a good cultivar of Rollinia cause otherwise you will waste a lot of time, effort and space.  I am sure there are good ones though the two I have tried have been off putting taste wise with the texture of, well, snot for a better term.

terejiguete

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2012, 02:20:10 PM »
hello


abemectina is very good for mites in general. even allowed in avocado against crystal spider, and can not forget the sulfur.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2012, 02:22:31 PM by terejiguete »

Guanabanus

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2012, 02:53:45 PM »
Here at least, Biriba (Rollinia deliciosa/mucosa) fruits twice a year.  If the winter crop is exposed to a lot of cold and considerable defoliation of the tree, the fruit probably  won't be fit to eat--- bitter and slimy.

Summer fruits are normally delicious.
Har

terejiguete

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2012, 05:23:49 PM »
Here at least, Biriba (Rollinia deliciosa/mucosa) fruits twice a year.  If the winter crop is exposed to a lot of cold and considerable defoliation of the tree, the fruit probably  won't be fit to eat--- bitter and slimy.

Summer fruits are normally delicious.


in my area so with anonna muricata, winter fruit fails to ripen

fruitlovers

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2012, 06:38:28 PM »
Most of these snotty textured fruits that have an off putting flavor, were eaten too late.

You must harvest and consume the fruit while still slightly firm and green.

This changes the story completely.  I've eaten fruits from the same tree, and the ones allowed to turn completely yellow were off putting and mushy.

I have got a grafted rollinia (I'm not quite sure of the source for the tree), but the leaves look quite different than the trees I've got flowering now.

I think there definitely are varieties out there, just not many grafting them.

Don't worry too much about getting a tasty fruited tree, all of the trees I've got fruits from tasted great.  Just plant a seed from a tasty fruit, and you should end up with something quite similar.



I am envious! Lol

Rollinia plants are next to impossible to find in california.. I was lucky enough to purchase a seedling from a friend.. unfortunately.. I damaged it while playing ball with my  dog..  OOPS... but it has budded out from the broken stem ainnd is making a recovery.. thankfully..

I had also ordered over 20  Rollinia seeds. Only one Germinated I'm calling it Lucky Rollinia.. the rest were moldy duds!!...

Sorry to hear about the doggy damage to your tree.  I learned not to use a retractible leash with my dog in my yard; he wraped the leash around a small mango tree and pulled it down.  I've never eaten a Rollinia fruit, so I'm looking forward to it someday.
I hope you got a good cultivar of Rollinia cause otherwise you will waste a lot of time, effort and space.  I am sure there are good ones though the two I have tried have been off putting taste wise with the texture of, well, snot for a better term.

Adam is right. Degree of ripeness will change the texture. I like them even when fully ripe, but at fully ripe stage i refrigerate them, and that also helps to firm up the texture. This is one fruit i like better chilled.
Rob, as far as i know, there are no rollinia cultivars in Florida. All the nurseries are starting plants from seed. That is true here also. Though some people name their seedling trees this is pretty meaningless when they go about propagating that tree by seed.
Oscar

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2012, 06:47:22 PM »
 Oscar,

they have varieties at fruit and spice park...check the inventory list of their species.

some were even developed in FL.

I have a grafted tree with unique leaves, I bought from a FL nursery (don't know the original grower, the tree was bought wholesale and retailed to me)


fruitlovers

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2012, 06:56:56 PM »
Oscar,

they have varieties at fruit and spice park...check the inventory list of their species.

some were even developed in FL.

I have a grafted tree with unique leaves, I bought from a FL nursery (don't know the original grower, the tree was bought wholesale and retailed to me)

Adam, where is the F&S plant list? I know it used to be on their website, but they seem to have removed that page?
Just to clarify, in my opinion, just because a tree is grafted does not magically turn it into a new cultivar. Something has to be done to show that this plant is really superior in some way. Otherwise every grafted tree would suddenly turn into a new culitvar. But this does seem to happen in Florida with mangos.  ::) :o
Oscar

bsbullie

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2012, 06:57:08 PM »
Of the two I had, one I definitely let sit too long after picking, it got too soft and tasted blah and texture was horrible.  The second one I had was picked in the evening, refrigerated and eaten later that night. texture was firmer though still not to MY liking but the taste was still not good IMO.  Not sure how the first one was picked but I picked the second one when coloration was solid yellow.  Tips turned brown within 30 minutes or so.  So was the second one I had let get too ripe on the tree and actually lost some of its "good" flavor?

- Rob

bsbullie

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2012, 07:03:15 PM »
Oscar,

they have varieties at fruit and spice park...check the inventory list of their species.

some were even developed in FL.

I have a grafted tree with unique leaves, I bought from a FL nursery (don't know the original grower, the tree was bought wholesale and retailed to me)

Adam, where is the F&S plant list? I know it used to be on their website, but they seem to have removed that page?
Just to clarify, in my opinion, just because a tree is grafted does not magically turn it into a new cultivar. Something has to be done to show that this plant is really superior in some way. Otherwise every grafted tree would suddenly turn into a new culitvar. But this does seem to happen in Florida with mangos.  ::) :o
Oscar - if you take a seed from any type of fruit and plant it out (call it "Plant A").  Say it is good and something one wants to reproduce.  You take a cutting and graft it to say a seedling rootstock.  You grow that out and the tree (growth and fruit characteristics) off of the grafted tree match Plant A.  You graft off of the grafted tree this time and again, results match Plant A.  Since it is not technically identical to anything else since it is a graft from a seedling...wouldn't that technically qualify for a plant that could be named and deemed a new cultivar?
- Rob

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2012, 07:05:04 PM »
Of the two I had, one I definitely let sit too long after picking, it got too soft and tasted blah and texture was horrible.  The second one I had was picked in the evening, refrigerated and eaten later that night. texture was firmer though still not to MY liking but the taste was still not good IMO.  Not sure how the first one was picked but I picked the second one when coloration was solid yellow.  Tips turned brown within 30 minutes or so.  So was the second one I had let get too ripe on the tree and actually lost some of its "good" flavor?

It's not a fruit to everyone's liking. Personally i really love them. But i notice that i have to be in the right mood to eat them. I can also hate them if i'm not in the mood for one. So can change from one eating experience to the next. Don't give up on it.
Oscar

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2012, 07:10:38 PM »
I am envious! Lol

Rollinia plants are next to impossible to find in california.. I was lucky enough to purchase a seedling from a friend.. unfortunately.. I damaged it while playing ball with my  dog..  OOPS... but it has budded out from the broken stem and is making a recovery.. thankfully..

I had also ordered over 20  Rollinia seeds. Only one Germinated I'm calling it Lucky Rollinia.. the rest were moldy duds!!...

Rollinia seeds need to be planted within a week of picking! 
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2012, 07:21:01 PM »
Rollinia seeds will get moldy if you're not thoroughly careful to remove every little bit of pulp from around the seeds. If you do remove it all and place seeds in zip lock with sp. moss then they will just start to germinate instead of molding. Same is true of rambutans.
Oscar

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #23 on: October 01, 2012, 08:58:46 PM »
Wow a lot of responses since last night.

I've learned a lot about rollinia seeds.. I soaked all of the ones I attempted to germinate in a bleach solution for a few days.  I've purchased closer to 30 seeds... all molded and were duds except one... The one I got to germinate was from a batch ordered from top tropicals. I inquired about the source  of the seeds and was only told they were from India.  Lord only knows how old they are.. I know with fresh cherimoya seeds i get a 90 percent germination rate with much more vigorous plants.. this rollinia was germinating in say.. may... and it's only now starting to take off at maybe 4 inches tall.. in comparison with the fresh cherimoya seeds i planted  around the same time are now for the most part at least 1 to 2 feet tall! big difference in vigor!  It's very hard to source fresh rollinia seeds!  As some of you mentioned.. cleaning the seeds after havesting from the fruit is the most important thing.. with all the cherimoya seeds I save I clean them thoroughly and soak in diluted bleach solution before drying and storing.. they have a great germination rate  from my experience and the feedback I've given people.. Most purchased seeds still have fruit residue on them though!  >:(


My "Lucky" Rollinia seedling
 

Mr. Clean

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Re: Rollinia Problems
« Reply #24 on: October 01, 2012, 09:17:49 PM »

If its the one he purchased from me its a seedling of a known good fruiting tree from Gary Zill.  Are there any known grafted varieties available for sale in South Florida?

Yes, it is the one I got from you; about 70% of my trees came from you. 
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110+ fruit trees/plants; 70+ mango trees; 12 jackfruit; 6 avocado; 3 persimmon; 2 longan; and a dog that keeps raccoons and squirrels away.

 

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