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Author Topic: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )  (Read 16568 times)

davidgarcia899

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Re: What am I?
« Reply #75 on: October 12, 2012, 10:26:57 AM »
It looks like something I want
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FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #76 on: October 12, 2012, 11:15:22 AM »
A. senegalensis has a vast distribution range - most of sub-Sahara Africa so I can imagine a lot of variation; but I did notice you mentioned the germination rate was high which is not the case with A. senegalensis; its seeds are small too - around the size of A. cornifolia if that helps any?

Soren,

it does help.  these seeds were larger (like sugar apple)

germination was about 100%...they separated easily, and handled transplant shock with no problem.

thanks for helping Soren! 

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: What am I?
« Reply #77 on: October 12, 2012, 11:20:23 AM »
I ran into this tree at Leu Gardens in Orlando.  The "fruits" were the size of a golf ball sized fuzzy fruit.  Is it edible? It was a rather sizable tree with dinner plate sized leaves.  For those in Orlando, the tree is with the bamboo and palms.




I forget the name of the fig, but im almost certain it's edible and tastes insipid.


Recher

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #78 on: October 12, 2012, 02:02:32 PM »
All Ficus (figs) are edible, but only ten are palatable. Far and away and the only first class Ficus is the well known commercial fig.

Being at Leu Gardens the other day, I noticed a specimen of F. auriculata (syn. F. roxburghii).

This species is well worth growing for no other reason than the very large leaves. At my place I have used them as dinner plates for parties to save cleaning up. I also make people eat with their fingers to achieve the same.

I grew and sold through my nursery umpteen seedlings. I planted two and have tasted several. I have had comments from SE Asians confirming one particular seedling is in quality above the rest.

The species is native to the Himalayan foothils on The eastern side. Hmmmm maybe it comes down itno malaysia.

Anyway, for every Ficus species circa 800 in number a species of wasp has co-evolved to polinate that particular Ficus. Sometimes, but more often not, the local fig wasp will take to pollinating an exotic Ficus introduction e.g. Ficus macrophylla in California.

What is interesting is this F. auriculata of mine started off with about one in a hundred fruit ripening priperly indicating feetilization...but no wasp..so for years I thought maybe a geneti propensity towards parthenocarpic fruit (commercial fig is 100% parthenocarpic)

The few that would ripen would be with a 3 month more or less window an don either side of that none.

Over these last 8  10 years many more than 1 /100 are ripening but far from a lot.

I now beleieve soem other insect is crawling inside and adventitiously pollinating.

I have had tens of thousands of backpackers thru my farm and many have tasted the fruit.

It is only one of two examples of fruits where people like it better than me.

A good one has a jelly inside and tastes UNMISTAKENLY of artificial strawberry and artificial coconut flavouring. Believe, that reads a lot better than it tastes.

Note even the ones that ripen properly the seed is not viable. They strike readily from cuttings or air layers.
 
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FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #79 on: October 12, 2012, 03:31:46 PM »
Recher,

U could contribute to Tomas's thread about other good figs (tropical figs, not common ones) for eating.
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=2860.msg40628#msg40628

Great info...thanks for taking time to post  :)

Recher

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #80 on: October 12, 2012, 04:21:03 PM »
Note I did not walk up to ficus in ? at Leu but concluded from afar that it was auriculata.
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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #81 on: October 12, 2012, 04:58:16 PM »
Pretty soon after, 1 month or so. I soaked overnight in a water with hydrogen peroxide mix.

Hi Nullzero,
Yours took a while :(
I soaked mine for 2 days, always changing the water and I washed the seeds to remove some left over pulp...I then put them in a lunch tin with some humid material and they started to germinate in 2 weeks..
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Tim

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #82 on: October 25, 2012, 11:49:47 PM »
Not a seedling but a fruit/berry I've been looking for the longest time, not knowing the name, it hadn't been easy.  Does anyone know what this fruit is? 

My old man grew these trees along the border of our property back in Vietnam as a hedge, but the berries were absolutely delicious, or so I thought back then.  The leaves are very similar to those of kwai muk both in size & rough sand paper like leaf surface, the edges feel razor sharp.  We, or at least I, used to punk other kids/friends using these leaves to pop their balloons.

Anyhow, texture is exactly like that of a cherry, but none of the acidity...very sweet.
Tim

nullzero

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #83 on: October 26, 2012, 12:46:58 AM »
Pretty soon after, 1 month or so. I soaked overnight in a water with hydrogen peroxide mix.

Hi Nullzero,
Yours took a while :(
I soaked mine for 2 days, always changing the water and I washed the seeds to remove some left over pulp...I then put them in a lunch tin with some humid material and they started to germinate in 2 weeks..

Probably due to the lowered heat this time of the year, however it has been on the warm side. The seeds could of germinated 1 week or so prior, since they seem to focus on the tap root before emerging from above.
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

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Re: What am I?
« Reply #84 on: November 27, 2012, 10:28:34 AM »
I ran into this tree at Leu Gardens in Orlando.  The "fruits" were the size of a golf ball sized fuzzy fruit.  Is it edible? It was a rather sizable tree with dinner plate sized leaves.  For those in Orlando, the tree is with the bamboo and palms.




Obviously some type of ficus, and all ficus species are edible, but as Recher likes to say: edible  does not always equal palatable.
Oscar

 

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