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Author Topic: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )  (Read 15024 times)

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #50 on: October 10, 2012, 05:26:44 PM »
Jackfruitwhisperer!!

u have an eagle eye...thanks for correcting my wrongful ID...I could have been sued by Nullzero!!!  I think Recher has a law suit pending against FLGreenman as we speak! I don't wanna be next!!  JUST KIDDING  ;D ;D ;D
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Mod edit: removed hot linked image. You can re-upload it to your own hosting and re post if you would like.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 05:33:22 PM by murahilin »

nullzero

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #51 on: October 10, 2012, 05:41:36 PM »
Jackfruitwhisperer!!

u have an eagle eye...thanks for correcting my wrongful ID...I could have been sued by Nullzero!!!  I think Recher has a law suit pending against FLGreenman as we speak! I don't wanna be next!!  JUST KIDDING  ;D ;D ;D
http://www.autolumination.com/images/auto_bulbs/eagle.gif

Mod edit: removed hot linked image. You can re-upload it to your own hosting and re post if you would like.


Adam,

I looked through google images, and the Strychnos spinosa looked similar enough. I do however have 2 confirmed Strychonos spinosa sprouting out, I can actually see the seed shells on them (so I am confident they are S. spinosa).
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Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #52 on: October 10, 2012, 06:09:24 PM »
Hi Null,

ahaha Welcome to the club ;D me too ain't good with da organization ;D...I tag'n mine with tin, too stay in the loop ;)

Another edible tree, I learn't today 8) Never heard of this one, too :o I guess, I still got a long road, ahead of me :)

Thanks for sharing the :) The tree is definitely a nitrogen fixa, with edible seeds and fruits 8)

Awesome to hear that Maboque is coming up...you will see that the seed has a similar style of germination, like Black Sapote. The seed has a type of waxy coating inside the seed...to facilitate the seedling to pop out, without getting stuck 8) I was truly amazed, when i saw this with my Black Sapotes 8)

Hi Adam,
 ;D No prob :) Adam, you and FloridaGreenMan should run 'n hide...the forum is full of lawyers...YIKES ;D  The Law suit will be served as fast as Lightning :o ;D

Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

nullzero

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #53 on: October 10, 2012, 06:58:31 PM »
Steven,

The Chanar fruit is said to be tasty, so I hope it is. Nitrogen fixing, drought tolerant, with tasty edible fruit (whats not to like). If I get some more seeds will give you a heads up.

Now waiting on the S. spinosa
Grow mainly fruits, vegetables, and herbs.

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #54 on: October 10, 2012, 10:46:57 PM »
ANY GUESSES!!! ??? WHAT ANNONA THIS COULD BE??FROM BRAZIL? AFRICA??

i think it was labeled as Annona dioce?  it reminds me of annona senegalensis with shiny leaves!



thanks Tim!

yes can anyone help ID this annona?
« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 10:50:24 PM by ASaffron »

Soren

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #55 on: October 11, 2012, 06:48:33 AM »
Adam they look a bit to shiny for me (could be the water and the flash), but otherwise it could be A. senegalensis with the very visible leaf veins and -shape; check if they have smaller hairs on the backside especially on the new leaves which is a common trait. Also - seeds of A. senegalensis are small with bad germination and take forever...
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

DurianLover

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What is it?
« Reply #56 on: October 11, 2012, 01:55:12 PM »
What is it? Latin name? Taste? Looks like cross between durian and pineapple. One guy in comments calls it Nibung fruit. But I'm not finding any info on this name.
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murahilin

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #57 on: October 11, 2012, 02:07:24 PM »
Nibong is Oncosperma tigillarium, but it looks more like fruit from the Nipah palm, Nypa fruticans.

tabbydan

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #58 on: October 11, 2012, 02:47:18 PM »
What is it? Latin name? Taste? Looks like cross between durian and pineapple. One guy in comments calls it Nibung fruit. But I'm not finding any info on this name.

Aren't YOU supposed to tell US how it tastes?
Though I guess that video is something you found on the web rather than took... since you seem to be in Sri Lanka and the video is Malaysia.

Looks pretty cool although I'm not sure how one eats it as it looks real tough (each segment contains 2385% of your yearly dose of fiber)

And it looks like the Nypa fruticans ID hits it on the head....
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

Mike T

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #59 on: October 11, 2012, 03:36:02 PM »
They are wild around here in low numbers getting more common as you head north.They are considered a mangrove of intertidal areas and no one here including the aboriginal people eat the fruit.

DurianLover

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #60 on: October 11, 2012, 03:47:12 PM »
What is it? Latin name? Taste? Looks like cross between durian and pineapple. One guy in comments calls it Nibung fruit. But I'm not finding any info on this name.

Aren't YOU supposed to tell US how it tastes?
Though I guess that video is something you found on the web rather than took... since you seem to be in Sri Lanka and the video is Malaysia.

Looks pretty cool although I'm not sure how one eats it as it looks real tough (each segment contains 2385% of your yearly dose of fiber)

And it looks like the Nypa fruticans ID hits it on the head....

Well, I live in Chicago area most of the time. My orchard is in Sri Lanka. I travel there frequently, including other countries in SE Asia (eventually I want to move to Asia full time). I never seen this fruit in Sri Lanka, Western Malaysia or Borneo.
Also your country of living doesn't mean that you will know all the flora. Many people In Sri Lanka people coming from dry zone to wet zone surprised to encounter durian for the first time in their lives. Similarly Western Malaysians have no idea of marang fruit, although  common in Borneo. Eastern Malaysians do not know D24 durian, although it has been golden standard of Malaysian durians for decade.

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #61 on: October 11, 2012, 04:53:15 PM »
Steven,

The Chanar fruit is said to be tasty, so I hope it is. Nitrogen fixing, drought tolerant, with tasty edible fruit (whats not to like). If I get some more seeds will give you a heads up.

Now waiting on the S. spinosa

Hi Stephen,
Chañar sure does sound awesome 8) WoW that's most generous of you, Thanks a bunch :)

Fingers crossed!!! Maboque will be kick'n soon :) BTW Null, did you plant the seeds straight away?
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

nullzero

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #62 on: October 11, 2012, 05:04:37 PM »
Pretty soon after, 1 month or so. I soaked overnight in a water with hydrogen peroxide mix.
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tabbydan

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #63 on: October 11, 2012, 05:49:35 PM »
I was ribbing you.

Interestingly it turns out Sri Lanka is part of its native habitat, but probably only on coastal areas.

So you live in Chicago and have an orchard in Sri Lanka, must be a real long drive on the Eisenhower expressway to get there.
I grew up in the Chicago area.

Have you tried the fruits of Artocarpus nobilis?  If so what are they like?

I tried Garcinia quaesita (goraka) there.  The fruits looked fantastic but they were horribly sour, I guess I should not have expected much as they are used as a natural preservative agent.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #64 on: October 11, 2012, 06:17:51 PM »
Adam they look a bit to shiny for me (could be the water and the flash), but otherwise it could be A. senegalensis with the very visible leaf veins and -shape; check if they have smaller hairs on the backside especially on the new leaves which is a common trait. Also - seeds of A. senegalensis are small with bad germination and take forever...

its not water!

they are super glabrous!!

maybe a subsp. of senegalensis?

thanks Soren for commenting

Mike T

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #65 on: October 11, 2012, 06:18:57 PM »
http://www.pacsoa.org.au/palms/Nypa/fruticans.html

There are some pandanus species with very similar looking fruit.It does not seem to be a taste sensation.They are feral in Panama and there are fossils everywhere from England to the South American inland areas from just 60 or 70 million years ago.

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DurianLover

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #67 on: October 11, 2012, 10:15:49 PM »
I was ribbing you.

Interestingly it turns out Sri Lanka is part of its native habitat, but probably only on coastal areas.

So you live in Chicago and have an orchard in Sri Lanka, must be a real long drive on the Eisenhower expressway to get there.
I grew up in the Chicago area.

Have you tried the fruits of Artocarpus nobilis?  If so what are they like?

I tried Garcinia quaesita (goraka) there.  The fruits looked fantastic but they were horribly sour, I guess I should not have expected much as they are used as a natural preservative agent.


Eisenhower sucks, I take invisible skyway, via Abu Dhabi. Only 20 hours drive :) :)

I'm having hard time finding a single article or good photo of Artocarpus nobilis. Can you send me good link? Only photo I found is this: http://biodiversityofsrilanka.blogspot.com/2012/06/wal-delbedi-delhingala-del-artocarpus.html Fruits look immature in this photo. Is it like breadfruit?

Article says that it is common in the village gardens.  I notice breadfruit tree in many village gardens, but over there fruit is very small and round without dark spots or sap overflowing like you see on the breadfruits in the Caribbean markets. Is it it?

DurianLover

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #68 on: October 11, 2012, 10:25:26 PM »

 Nipah fruits

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nypa_fruticans


http://nizaworld.wordpress.com/2011/02/11/buah-nipah-pernah-cuba/


I'm wondering if one can tap the sap for a juice similar to sugarcane? It is hinted in the Wikipedia and Malay article. And whoever wrote that article must not have finished 5 grades in Malay school. Google having hard time understanding ... gaps after every three words he wrote.

tabbydan

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #69 on: October 11, 2012, 10:26:43 PM »
I've never seen the fruits of Artocarpus nobilis.  I've only seen the trees.

Oddly it seems with the native fruits of Sri Lanka that the info is hard to come by.  Before I went there I tried to look up all I could and I found scant photos of the fruits...

Even the "goraka" I mentioned... if you look at the online photos they look different from the fruit I saw.  The one I saw had more prominent ribbing (and more strange looking too) and was a deep crimson.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

tabbydan

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Re: What is it?
« Reply #70 on: October 11, 2012, 10:30:45 PM »
I'm wondering if one can tap the sap for a juice similar to sugarcane? It is hinted in the Wikipedia and Malay article. And whoever wrote that article must not have finished 5 grades in Malay school. Google having hard time understanding ... gaps after every three words he wrote.

There are other articles about this on the web.
You can tap it for sap, and people do that.
In fact, it looks like it could also be a good bio-ethanol crop as you can get more ethanol from it per acre than you can with sugarcane (and presumably you aren't using fertilizer, pesticides... as this seems to be a plant that requires little care and is invasive)
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

MarkoS

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What am I?
« Reply #71 on: October 11, 2012, 11:48:17 PM »
I ran into this tree at Leu Gardens in Orlando.  The "fruits" were the size of a golf ball sized fuzzy fruit.  Is it edible? It was a rather sizable tree with dinner plate sized leaves.  For those in Orlando, the tree is with the bamboo and palms.


Mike T

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Re: What am I?
« Reply #72 on: October 11, 2012, 11:55:52 PM »
There are dozens of giant fig species around here that look similar.

marklee

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Re: What am I?
« Reply #73 on: October 12, 2012, 12:36:43 AM »
It might be the Rixford fig.

Mark Lee
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Soren

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Re: The Small Seedling Identification Thread ( UFO's )
« Reply #74 on: October 12, 2012, 03:59:08 AM »
A. senegalensis has a vast distribution range - most of sub-Sahara Africa so I can imagine a lot of variation; but I did notice you mentioned the germination rate was high which is not the case with A. senegalensis; its seeds are small too - around the size of A. cornifolia if that helps any?
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

 

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