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Author Topic: Toona sinensis  (Read 1174 times)

shaneatwell

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Toona sinensis
« on: June 19, 2018, 11:30:50 AM »
Came across this by accident cruising Craigslist farm and garden. Sounds like a great green. I see a couple posts here that mention it in passing. Would love to hear more about it. How does it taste? Can it survive in southern California? Is it invasive?

Beautiful tree.
Shane

fyliu

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Re: Toona sinensis
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2018, 01:49:38 PM »
I think the young shoots in spring is what people eat. I got one plant from a friend but it's not done very well last year and died back to the ground during a freeze that also took out all the sweet potato leaves. It did survive and came back this year. Hopefully it will become established in the ground so I can try it later. It doesn't seem invasive to me yet.

shaneatwell

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Re: Toona sinensis
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2018, 03:31:08 PM »
Thanks Fang.

Guy with his office across from mine used to cook it regularly. He says its ok, but hasn't really missed it since he moved here. Good enough for me. I love the color, but i guess it doesn't really show without cold winters.
Shane

SeaWalnut

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Re: Toona sinensis
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2019, 10:34:47 PM »
Forget about the color and the ornamental value because the taste alone its worth trying it.People say it smells like onions but to me it smalls like roasted beans with onion and pepper.Basically smells like a complex cooked food and i think that even people that dont like greens would like toona.

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Re: Toona sinensis
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2019, 03:55:59 PM »
Made some toona scramble last week and we all agreed that its not realy bad but also nothing special. What did i do wrong?

Luisport

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Re: Toona sinensis
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2019, 04:04:24 PM »
Made some toona scramble last week and we all agreed that its not realy bad but also nothing special. What did i do wrong?
Your variety is pink flamingo? I read this have a better flavour...

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Re: Toona sinensis
« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2019, 11:14:16 PM »
I used the only tree in the city. No idea about the variety. Slight onion taste but basically like some cooked sorrel.

SeaWalnut

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Re: Toona sinensis
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2019, 04:37:24 AM »
Best to eat these is to wet them in a little water then pass them through a mix of flour and salt( and something spicy) and then fry them in oil.I like lobsters but if you cook the lobster with scrambled eggs then i would say too,its ok but nothing special.Pink flamingo its edible just like the rest but its only cultivated for decorative purpose.Chinese eat only the green reddish ones from what ive seened.I try to grow the green ones from seeds to see how fast they grow but i had no interest in pink flamingo because thats a bushy multistemmed variety( thats why i think its pink,because has thin trunks that feel the cold better).No success so far with the seeds.They might be hard to germinate just like  Toona Cilliata the australian one wich has seeds that loose viability after 2 or 3 weeks.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 04:40:26 AM by SeaWalnut »

 

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