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Author Topic: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California  (Read 1393 times)

SoCal2warm

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giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« on: June 19, 2018, 02:14:05 PM »





Just got it into the ground.

location is about 12 miles from the coast, so I would consider it solid zone 10 (between 10a and 10b)

That's a lychee and tree fern you see up in the top left in the picture.

This is a bigger specimen than most people have tried, so it already has a well developed root system and may have a better chance of surviving. This guy wasn't cheap. But it's a big beautiful plant. (yes, purple mangosteen)

boxturtle

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2018, 02:18:37 PM »
might need to give it some shade

Ethan

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2018, 09:14:51 PM »
Nice, good luck!

roblack

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2018, 10:46:28 PM »
Beautiful little tree! Good luck and please keep us posted.

I'm trying the same here in So FL. Growing it above ground in root saver pots, and will let it grow into the ground. My biggest worry is the limestone soil here, so want to elevate it as much as possible. As it hasn't grown through the pot bottom yet, considering digging a hole as deep and wide as possible and amending the soil.

How cold does it get in your location? Mine handled temps in the high 30's without noticeable stress. Starting with a more established tree should give you a better shot at success.

gozp

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2018, 03:11:12 AM »
How much did u get it for?

WHat variety, seems like a seedling?

Ulfr

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2018, 03:54:40 AM »
I don’t like your chances but happy to see your experiment and wish you the best of luck :)

WHat variety, seems like a seedling?

I forget the reasoning but mangosteen are true to seed, almost clones, aren’t they?

Schutzhund

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2018, 12:36:58 PM »
Best of luck, keep us updated

EvilFruit

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2018, 04:17:00 PM »
Quote
Soil

The tree is not adapted to limestone and does best in deep, rich organic soil, especially sandy loam or laterite. In India, the most productive specimens are on clay containing much coarse material and a little silt. Sandy alluvial soils are unsuitable and sand low in humus contributes to low yields. The tree needs good drainage and the water table ought to be about 6 ft (1.8 m) below ground level. However, in the Canal Zone, productive mangosteen groves have been established where it is too wet for other fruit trees–in swamps requiring drainage ditches between rows and in situations where the roots were bathed with flowing water most of the year, in spite of the fact that standing water in nursery beds will kill seedlings. The mangosteen must be sheltered from strong winds and salt spray, as well as saline soil or water.

https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/mangosteen.html

Good luck
Moh'd

SoCal2warm

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2018, 09:53:29 PM »



Coach62

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2018, 09:23:50 PM »
Seriously, I've been looking for a mangosteen forever!  But, I did want one that was larger.  Anyone know where I can find one?

SoCal2warm

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2018, 09:53:48 PM »
Despite keeping it well watered, the small tree got baked in the 105° heat wave.



Two chairs were later put up on either side to put a shade cover over it.

arc310

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2018, 01:26:19 AM »
that's a good looking tree...before getting fried. but looks like it can recover..just cover up for the next few days with the heat coming in. did you order it online or was it a local nursery?

i had thought they need a good amount of humidity for this area. i almost wanted to try putting it into a greenhouse or something to provide more humidity for it.

i didn't realize how many mangosteen trees were in hawaii last time i went.

DurianLover

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2018, 03:23:12 AM »
Despite keeping it well watered, the small tree got baked in the 105° heat wave.



Two chairs were later put up on either side to put a shade cover over it.

They can fry in a similar fashion in tropics with 95F heatwave, and relatively high humidity. 105F and low humidity is a different matter all together.  Surprised in it's still alive after such stress.
Trees of this size kept under permanent partial shade even in cooler parts of the tropics.They adore 50-70% partial shade. I would extend permanent partial shade until about Oct.

OCchris1

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2018, 01:35:31 AM »
I agree. That little tree needs some shade cloth. A lot of fruit trees that size would get burned in a similar fashion. Good luck. Chris
-Chris

SoCal2warm

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2018, 08:59:20 PM »
The mangosteen, after surviving the heat wave


It looks like at least some of the leaves are still lush green, even if badly deformed. I'm not sure whether this is new growth that came out or whether some of the smaller old leaves managed to hang on. It appears to be slowly recovering, although it took a big hit.

Ethan

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2018, 11:53:36 PM »
Nice looking new growth, are you going to build a cold frame for winter?

Tropicdude

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #16 on: September 05, 2018, 11:03:10 PM »
Shade shade and more shade,   heat is not the problem,   my tree I have tried many times to get it accustomed to a little sunlight,  any leaf that even sees the sun for more than an hour gets fried like those in your picture.   

lots of water and zero direct sunlight.
William
" The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago.....The second best time, is now ! "

tropicbreeze

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2018, 12:00:50 AM »
When they're small they do need more shade. Some friends have several trees that are a good 3 metres tall out in full sun all day. Their climate is more humid which is probably what makes the difference. Nearly lost mine when the automatic irrigation played up and I didn't notice at first, until a lot of the leaves browned. It's in a lot of shade but still took a good two years to recover. The relative humidity here can get very low and temperatures high during the dry season but the Mangosteen copes quite well in the shade provided it gets lots of water.

SoCal2warm

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2018, 06:27:52 AM »
Rainy and temperatures in the 80s, the mangosteen is doing good.

Empoweredandfree

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Re: giving mangosteen a try in Southern California
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2018, 05:28:43 PM »
Rainy and temperatures in the 80s, the mangosteen is doing good.

Keep up the good work! I'm rooting for you and the tree! Mangosteens are tough trees which surprised me due to their reputation.

 

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