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Author Topic: Junglesop (Anonidium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!  (Read 48538 times)

FlyingFoxFruits

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I figured we'd start a thread about this tree...now that seeds seem to be floating around the world  :)

maybe merge our lengthy discussions about this fruit from "the for sale" section, into this thread?

This fruit is supposed to be the second largest tree borne fruit right?

and its an annona?

OK u've got my attention...now tell me more.  :)
« Last Edit: April 08, 2015, 09:46:53 PM by FlyingFoxFruits »

tabbydan

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A friend (not on this list) and I often talked about this fruit.  He was also keen on A. segenalisis.  Definitely some cool stuff.
I think there's a ton of gems in Africa that outsiders aren't aware of.  Sadly the rainforests there (like ones everywhere) are being quickly felled.

He kept trying to order the African Annonas from a place in Germany.  DHS opened his mail, and when they realized it didn't contain tiny terrorists (as they suspected) they'd hand it to the USDA which would replace his seeds with a nasty-gram

Like saifu (another facinating African fruit), or the aframomiums these Annonas sound very interesting.... large and tasty.  Not like the "African breadfruit" / "African Breadnut" (not actually an Artocarpus) that involves a lot of work to get a whole bunch of tiny treats (that are supposedly ok but not so great).
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

amaqeq

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Looks like a giant green strawberry
while having the chance was not aware of its existence
And now that I am I don't
It is looking like a tree who needs to grow in the bush as Jackfruitwhisperer mentioned
The inside looks a bit fibrous like Annona montana (at least from the photo)
about acquiring taste I wont count on similarities between the different palates
one of my former workers in Liberia was offering me every morning an Clove of garlic to chew as a snake to open the day
And The palm wine had also the taste of an old fart
surely that is bilateral experience whenever two cultures examine each others food
like old blue cheese for example
But I'm also convinced there must be big variation between those trees grown at different location far from each other isolated in the bushes
Investing time to grow a fruit the locals do not bother to eat is a fun
but not my kind of fun



Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Adam,

I totally agree with you...it's about time a thread is dedicated to the African King of the Annonaceae.


TabbyDan, I have tried do germinate Safou...with no success! I also posted a pic of the weird seed ;) My friend like Safou very much and is usually sold in the streets of Germany.
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Looks like a giant green strawberry
while having the chance was not aware of its existence
And now that I am I don't
It is looking like a tree who needs to grow in the bush as Jackfruitwhisperer mentioned
The inside looks a bit fibrous like Annona montana (at least from the photo)
about acquiring taste I wont count on similarities between the different palates
one of my former workers in Liberia was offering me every morning an Clove of garlic to chew as a snake to open the day
And The palm wine had also the taste of an old fart
surely that is bilateral experience whenever two cultures examine each others food
like old blue cheese for example
But I'm also convinced there must be big variation between those trees grown at different location far from each other isolated in the bushes
Investing time to grow a fruit the locals do not bother to eat is a fun
but not my kind of fun

Hi Amaqeq,
Most certainly there is a huge variation between trees grown in different locations...Mannii is found in Congo,northern Angola, Zambia, Ghana, Nigeria, Gabon and Cameroon. I wonder if they are also found in Guinea, Sierra Loene, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Togo, Benin or even São Tomé e principe :-\

Yikes, a clove of garlic every morning :o Garlic is also used to get the ''something'' back  ;)
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

FlyingFoxFruits

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Its been a while since I've had a fruit that tasted like the smell of broken wind. (bad surinam cherry)

and a while since I've met someone with the gall to liken a fruit to the taste of flatulence.

Pleased to meet you friend.  ;D ;D

happy u joined the forum.

Annonas, Fruits, Farts, Friends, Forums  :)

Looks like a giant green strawberry
while having the chance was not aware of its existence
And now that I am I don't
It is looking like a tree who needs to grow in the bush as Jackfruitwhisperer mentioned
The inside looks a bit fibrous like Annona montana (at least from the photo)
about acquiring taste I wont count on similarities between the different palates
one of my former workers in Liberia was offering me every morning an Clove of garlic to chew as a snake to open the day
And The palm wine had also the taste of an old fart
surely that is bilateral experience whenever two cultures examine each others food
like old blue cheese for example
But I'm also convinced there must be big variation between those trees grown at different location far from each other isolated in the bushes
Investing time to grow a fruit the locals do not bother to eat is a fun
but not my kind of fun

tabbydan

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I agree there are many acquired tastes here and there in the world.  In the 25 of the best fruits book the Danforths talk about some "odd tasting fruits" that Congolese people seem to like- at the same time most of the stuff they find they really liked too (junglesop WAS one of those)

I think Africa probably has at least as many fruit treasures to offer up as Asia or South America... it's just a lot less well known to the outside world.

The Saifu is actually why I joined this list.  The friend I mentioned showed me a link to the post with the picture of Saifu seeds and we both drooled about the Saifu (neither of us has tried it).  I won't make a strong effort to get seeds of it right now because I know my chances of getting it to fruit are about nill (I only collect such things incidentally, that is if I encounter the fruit and eat it).

Just in the genus Aframomium I imagine there are several tasty fruits (I know that genus has several nice spices, one identical to cardimom, another like a cross between black pepper and a burst of citrus)
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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I agree there are many acquired tastes here and there in the world.  In the 25 of the best fruits book the Danforths talk about some "odd tasting fruits" that Congolese people seem to like- at the same time most of the stuff they find they really liked too (junglesop WAS one of those)

I think Africa probably has at least as many fruit treasures to offer up as Asia or South America... it's just a lot less well known to the outside world.

The Saifu is actually why I joined this list.  The friend I mentioned showed me a link to the post with the picture of Saifu seeds and we both drooled about the Saifu (neither of us has tried it).  I won't make a strong effort to get seeds of it right now because I know my chances of getting it to fruit are about nill (I only collect such things incidentally, that is if I encounter the fruit and eat it).

Just in the genus Aframomium I imagine there are several tasty fruits (I know that genus has several nice spices, one identical to cardimom, another like a cross between black pepper and a burst of citrus)



Hi Dan,
I tried to get more seeds, but was not successfully. Oscar is up for some seeds. I will try to get more seeds next year and if you are interested, i can also try to get you some as well ;)

Here's an awesome link that Bruce(BMc) posted on Safou 8)
http://www.cropsforthefuture.org/publication/position-paper/Quality%20Standards%20for%20Dacryodes%20edulis.pdf

FYI My friend has a gorgeous seedling that is successfully growing in a pot in Germany...so what the diffrence between DC and Germany? You can also grow them successfully there too...Fruiting the plant is a diffrent story. My friend did share some pics of the tree...will ask for permission to post the pics  8) I don't share stuff without asking permission first ;)

 
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

tabbydan

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I am interested but not sure if I'm worthy.  I know my friend would LOVE some seeds of it.

African fruits are a special fascination of mine, which is somewhat ironic as I keep focusing my travel plans on Asia (but then I tend to like Asian culture, food, architecture...).  Of course Asian and South American fruits also captivate me but I think the "outside" world has a better understanding of those.
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

fruitlovers

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Looks like a giant green strawberry
while having the chance was not aware of its existence
And now that I am I don't
It is looking like a tree who needs to grow in the bush as Jackfruitwhisperer mentioned
The inside looks a bit fibrous like Annona montana (at least from the photo)
about acquiring taste I wont count on similarities between the different palates
one of my former workers in Liberia was offering me every morning an Clove of garlic to chew as a snake to open the day
And The palm wine had also the taste of an old fart
surely that is bilateral experience whenever two cultures examine each others food
like old blue cheese for example
But I'm also convinced there must be big variation between those trees grown at different location far from each other isolated in the bushes
Investing time to grow a fruit the locals do not bother to eat is a fun
but not my kind of fun


I'm going to do it, but purely for "scientifc" reasons. Or maybe i'll sell it back to the Cameroonis as an excellent Hawaiian fruit in the future?  HAHAHAHA  This is all supposing that the seeds ever sprout!  ::)
Oscar

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2012, 07:21:21 PM »
Here's a photo of this badboy Annona.....I talk about this fruit in my Annona presentation


FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2012, 07:27:23 PM »
I need to grow this one...just so there will be one other photo available on the planet of this fruit.  ::) Everybody seems to use this one and only photo!
Oscar

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2012, 07:35:03 PM »
I need to grow this one...just so there will be one other photo available on the planet of this fruit.  ::) Everybody seems to use this one and only photo!
and so u can sell me a usa grown seed.

God Bless America.

FlyingFoxFruits

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2012, 07:38:34 PM »


go white boy go white boy go!

Eat eat eat. 

Now clean those seeds, package them properly and send them to USA.

this might be my favorite picture.

FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2012, 07:52:14 PM »
I need to grow this one...just so there will be one other photo available on the planet of this fruit.  ::) Everybody seems to use this one and only photo!

You are very correct. That is the most widely used Junglesop photo!
FloridaGreenMan

tabbydan

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2012, 09:15:27 PM »
Shouldn't the "God bless America" be right under the "Go white boy go" considering the Danforths are missionaries from the US?  If I'm not mistaken that's one of the Danforths in the photo.

I got to get off my butt and upload some more pics... that one from "...25 of the best" reminds me of a shot my wife took of me eating Durian which I like to call "Who let that white pig into the market".

Also, one of these days I should be in Thailand for the Durian eating contest...  I'm way off my peak but still I think I could make a horrifying display of stuffing myself (with a deadly belch later on).
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

BMc

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2012, 05:13:00 AM »
I had a few extra seeds and ran out of good seed raising mix, so threw the leftovers into a zip-lock bag with a barely damp paper towel 3 weeks back. I checked them today for the first time in a fortnight and many had shot. A few looked a day or two past perfect, but most looked to be nice and strong. Should not be too long until we get some movement above ground!  ;D



Mike T

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2012, 05:23:03 AM »
Bmc dreamfrutas will be jumpin' outa his skin to get some.

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2012, 06:37:43 PM »
I am interested but not sure if I'm worthy.  I know my friend would LOVE some seeds of it.

African fruits are a special fascination of mine, which is somewhat ironic as I keep focusing my travel plans on Asia (but then I tend to like Asian culture, food, architecture...).  Of course Asian and South American fruits also captivate me but I think the "outside" world has a better understanding of those.

Hi Dan,
I will try to get seeds for u and ya friend ;) Then ya will c if ya, worthy or not ;D
Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

Tropicalgrower89

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Alexi

Soren

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« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 06:37:19 AM by Soren »
Søren
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fruitlovers

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #21 on: October 04, 2012, 06:47:04 AM »
Soren, thanks for the VOA link. Here are the 2 key paragraphs for me:

"The junglesop," he continues, "needs research [for example, on how to create] improved varieties by grafting genetic material from the trees with fruit that is seedless or [sweet] tasting all the time. Only 30 percent [of the trees produce fruit that tastes good]: there is a balance between the sourness and sweetness of the fruits; some are almost all sour. But the ones that are sweet [have] an excellent flavor that rivals a peach."

But it may be years before junglesop is grown on a large scale. Agriculturalists say work is needed in learning how to fight the fungal diseases that affect the trees. Danforth says scientists also need to develop plants that can produce fruit within years. He says some that he has developed have not produced fruit in two decades.
Oscar

Soren

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #22 on: October 04, 2012, 09:28:04 AM »
Soren, thanks for the VOA link. Here are the 2 key paragraphs for me:

"The junglesop," he continues, "needs research [for example, on how to create] improved varieties by grafting genetic material from the trees with fruit that is seedless or [sweet] tasting all the time. Only 30 percent [of the trees produce fruit that tastes good]: there is a balance between the sourness and sweetness of the fruits; some are almost all sour. But the ones that are sweet [have] an excellent flavor that rivals a peach."

But it may be years before junglesop is grown on a large scale. Agriculturalists say work is needed in learning how to fight the fungal diseases that affect the trees. Danforth says scientists also need to develop plants that can produce fruit within years. He says some that he has developed have not produced fruit in two decades.

Oscar I noticed those as well - it can be concluded from the above that there is a lot of variability regarding taste (which can explain why it is not consumed in Cameroon), and that 10-15 years might not be long enough too see a fruiting.
We need budwood...
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #23 on: October 04, 2012, 05:38:27 PM »
Yes Soren, i came to same conclusions. Those seeds from Cameroon are probably the other not so desirable 70%. Still good to grow them out and hope to get good budwood in the future.
Oscar

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #24 on: October 04, 2012, 06:08:32 PM »
Danforth says scientists also need to develop plants that can produce fruit within years. He says some that he has developed have not produced fruit in two decades.

I find this slightly more encouraging than others seem to have. It seems that the 2 deacdes reference is for super duds but not truly indicative of the species as a whole, as implied by the word 'some', rather than 'many' or similar. Unfortunately it only gives us the 'cons' list on fruiting. Has anyone seen better statistical data on fruiting ages, or just throw away anecdotals that err on the side of disparaging growers? Or is it up to those that have recieved seed in the past few months to report over the next 20 or so years? Still the data would not be representative as all seeds I think came from three fruits from the same tree?

 

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