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Author Topic: Junglesop (Anonidium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!  (Read 42942 times)

fruitlovers

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #25 on: October 04, 2012, 06:14:44 PM »
BMC, i prefer to remain skeptical, grow them out anyway, and be possibly pleasantly surprised some day in the distant future. Rather than be super optimistic, grow them out, and find out after 20 years of maintaining the tree that even the cattle here won't eat them. I think like with most things African you need to go there in person to get the real scoop. I wouldn't call it the dark continent, but the mysterious continent!
Oscar

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #26 on: October 04, 2012, 07:34:00 PM »
Have to agree with Oscar and I am also skeptical of African fruits in general.  From what I read in the Congo Native Fruits book, The Lost Crops of Africa book and from the few African fruits that I have tasted here, there is not much over there that would interest me very much.  In fact, many African fruit farmers tend to grow fruits like Mangos, Bananas and Pineapples and few of their own native fruits.  The key places to find the best new fruits of the future are still  probably SE Asia, Central America and the Amazon basin. Just my opinion. 
FloridaGreenMan

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #27 on: October 04, 2012, 08:05:15 PM »
The man pictured eating Junglesop is Paul D Noren, who with Roy M Danforth, wrote Congo Native Fruits: Twenty-Five of the Best.  Third edition: July 1997.  The last chapter is short descriptions of 25 other fruits of the Congo.  These gentlemen are great friends who have visited us here several times.  The protracted civil war in Zaire forced them to leave their mission station and fruit project.  So they started up two projects in the Central African Republic.  I haven't communicated with them lately, but the staff at ECHO probably has.
Har

fruitlovers

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #28 on: October 04, 2012, 08:24:28 PM »
Have to agree with Oscar and I am also skeptical of African fruits in general.  From what I read in the Congo Native Fruits book, The Lost Crops of Africa book and from the few African fruits that I have tasted here, there is not much over there that would interest me very much.  In fact, many African fruit farmers tend to grow fruits like Mangos, Bananas and Pineapples and few of their own native fruits.  The key places to find the best new fruits of the future are still  probably SE Asia, Central America and the Amazon basin. Just my opinion.

The best African fruit left there in the 1500's: watermelon. I'm sure there are still some little gems there left to be discovered, but nothing like the quantities found in S. America or SE Asia. Wish i was wrong, would love to be proved wrong.
Oscar

Soren

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #29 on: October 05, 2012, 12:22:50 AM »
Have to agree with Oscar and I am also skeptical of African fruits in general.  From what I read in the Congo Native Fruits book, The Lost Crops of Africa book and from the few African fruits that I have tasted here, there is not much over there that would interest me very much.  In fact, many African fruit farmers tend to grow fruits like Mangos, Bananas and Pineapples and few of their own native fruits.  The key places to find the best new fruits of the future are still  probably SE Asia, Central America and the Amazon basin. Just my opinion.

The best African fruit left there in the 1500's: watermelon. I'm sure there are still some little gems there left to be discovered, but nothing like the quantities found in S. America or SE Asia. Wish i was wrong, would love to be proved wrong.



I think we had the same discussion years back on the yahoo group; here are many great species with a lot of potential but selection is needed. I have tasted many African fruits better than common and more known species grown elsewhere.
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

fruitlovers

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #30 on: October 05, 2012, 03:17:56 AM »
Soren, yes i remember that discussion also. And not much seems to have changed. Which African fruits have you had that in your opinion are better than common?
Oscar

Soren

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2012, 03:46:28 AM »
Would have to dig into my comments on Yahoo group to recall - but Berchemia discolor, Canarium schweinfurthii, Aframomum sp., Oyster nut, Annona senegalensis and Vitex sp. springs into mind. There are many more which I have never tasted, but they are (even more) highly recommended so the Ugandan list alone is a lot longer of course. Several others are still good, but perhaps not to that level; Tamarind, Cordia sp., Chrysophyllum sp., Pseudospondias microcarpa, Giant Yellow Mulberry etc.
I think the main problem is accessibility together with lack of cultivation and selection practices here in Africa - in addition; most people are not less interested in trying new things; as an example I have traded more soursop and noni seeds than rare African species...
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

tabbydan

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2012, 05:38:22 PM »
I have to agree with Soren.

1) Africa is a BIG continent with as much tropical rainforest as S America or Asia.  Rainforests tend to have lots of fruiting plants.  One would expect that "tasty" fruits would occur "randomly" with a given frequency across the globe because plants make fruits to attract fruit eaters to spread the seeds.   A given fruit might attract some frugivores and not others.  It would be truly weird for a whole continent to have a significantly different percentage of "tasty" fruits than another.

2) I've read of a number of tasty fruits from Africa.  Even if we look at some odd nitche like "fatty fruits" we get things like Shea, Saifu,...

3) The argument "well they are growing 'our' crops so how good can theirs be?" is actually not a terribly good argument.  I've done a lot of traveling in Asia and what I can see is the whole world is increasingly moving towards fewer and fewer species, and guess what those are the commodity crops.  So by that argument the best stuff in the world is corn, potatoes, tomato, coffee,... and all the stuff we talk about on this group is just some junk a few freaky people like (BTW some of those commodity crops like coffee, peanuts... are of African origin)
What's that got to do with Jose Andres $10 brussel sprouts?

BMc

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2012, 05:20:09 AM »
If you have or ever get seeds of Jungle sop make sure you put them in a long pot. The tap root is huge. Today I put them in long pots on advice from a mate who I gave seed to. One of the roots was almost 5 inches long. Still nothing more than taproot though.

msk0072

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2012, 02:49:54 PM »
If you have or ever get seeds of Jungle sop make sure you put them in a long pot. The tap root is huge. Today I put them in long pots on advice from a mate who I gave seed to. One of the roots was almost 5 inches long. Still nothing more than taproot though.
Thanks for the advice, I have to repot my newly planted seeds to a longer pot.  Is it like pawpaw, long taproot bevor the shoots come out from the ground?
Mike

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2012, 07:43:05 PM »
I'm still praying for my seed to sprout up!!

Its been about a month since planting.

I still have hope.


Soren

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #36 on: November 01, 2012, 04:22:42 AM »
I just got a seed germinating from one I received from Eric back in mid September - it was a floater so I had given up hope...
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #37 on: November 01, 2012, 01:10:39 PM »
Soren!

thanks for info
 

BMc

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #38 on: January 24, 2013, 04:51:09 AM »
i just tipped one of my pots out to see what was going on in there. the Junglesop has grown an enormous taproot. Anyone seen anything like it? The connection at the seed is very weak and snapped on comming out of the pot. not sure if the roots will survive and shoot but it shows how much underground development these guys go through before they ever think of shooting above ground. Reminds me of Bunya in a way.






« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 04:59:46 AM by BMc »

siafu

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #39 on: January 24, 2013, 05:02:42 AM »

 Asimina (American Pawpaw) and Bacuri (Platonia esculenta/insignis) do the same thing.
 Thet grow a huge tap root before breaking the surface of the soil.
Sérgio Duarte
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Soren

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #40 on: January 24, 2013, 06:53:46 AM »
i just tipped one of my pots out to see what was going on in there. the Junglesop has grown an enormous taproot. Anyone seen anything like it? The connection at the seed is very weak and snapped on comming out of the pot. not sure if the roots will survive and shoot but it shows how much underground development these guys go through before they ever think of shooting above ground. Reminds me of Bunya in a way.








Bruce - mine broke from the seed (which I have removed) and are now developing very small leaves/shoots from the main root stem. I spoke with Eric (who supplied the seeds), and he was disappointed in the germination rate of this years seeds. Reminds me of Stelechocarpus burahol.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2013, 06:55:51 AM by Soren »
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

Soren

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #41 on: January 25, 2013, 03:41:19 AM »
I got this from Troy;

Anonidium manni is a very tricky species particularly if the seed is oxygen depleted during germination or a rapid temperature change.  The seed will partial germinate and then stop or go on a go slow to the detriment of the germination.  If the seed has dropped off and started to show small green pups or shoots then this means its re-shooting....great news.
 
If the seed has not dropped off or you start to notice rot pull the seed off 9 times out of 10 they will re-shoot.  If left to long the rot will travel and the seed and roots will be unable to come back.
 
This is a tricky species, the only other species who has this same issue that I have found is Goniothalamus (Australiasian annonaceae species).
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

fruitlovers

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #42 on: January 25, 2013, 03:49:41 AM »
Lots of fruit trees put out giant taproots before starting to grow leaves. The largest taprooted seedlings i can think of are both in the palm family: toddy palm (Borassus flabeliferus) and double coconut (Lodoicea maldivica). In many cases these large taprooted seedlings come from areas that experience drought. This is a strategy to insure the plant will get enough water.
Oscar

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #43 on: January 25, 2013, 06:49:10 AM »
Fruit trees that produce huge taproots, should be planted in-situ to prevent the taproot from bending in the pot. The seeds planted in the field must be protected, so that animals don't disturb germination and formation of the seedlings...small cage with a brick on top, should work fine.  :)

 
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fruitlovers

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #44 on: January 26, 2013, 02:27:17 AM »
Fruit trees that produce huge taproots, should be planted in-situ to prevent the taproot from bending in the pot. The seeds planted in the field must be protected, so that animals don't disturb germination and formation of the seedlings...small cage with a brick on top, should work fine.  :)

 

True. It's preferable but not always possible to plant long tap rooted plants directly into the ground. When it's not possible then it's certainly not hard to find very deep pots. You can even make a super deep pot by gluing 2 deep pots one on top of the other.
Oscar

Mike T

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #45 on: January 26, 2013, 03:09:20 AM »


With these 2 one is emerging like a bean and the other has 2 shoots coming from underground.

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #46 on: January 26, 2013, 07:35:28 AM »
Fruit trees that produce huge taproots, should be planted in-situ to prevent the taproot from bending in the pot. The seeds planted in the field must be protected, so that animals don't disturb germination and formation of the seedlings...small cage with a brick on top, should work fine.  :)

 


True. It's preferable but not always possible to plant long tap rooted plants directly into the ground. When it's not possible then it's certainly not hard to find very deep pots. You can even make a super deep pot by gluing 2 deep pots one on top of the other.


There is deep pots available, but not cheap...Tall one tree pots. They are commonly used for pawpaws and others.
http://www.stuewe.com/products/treepots.php
I have done what you suggested(two deep pots one on top of the other) for a jackfruit seedling...it's works great and the jackfruit grows quite fast...a cheap solution  :)

The only problem with very deep pots...you must be super carefull not to disturb them roots, to prevent transplant shock. Of course, some trees are more tolerant, than other...pawpaw is a good example for not being one of them.



Time is like a river.
You cannot touch the same water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again.
Enjoy every moment of your life!

Jackfruitwhisperer69

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #47 on: January 26, 2013, 07:38:48 AM »


With these 2 one is emerging like a bean and the other has 2 shoots coming from underground.


Hi Mike
AWESOME!!! Those two seedlings are looking sharp 8) Congrats on the successful germination of mannii :)
Time is like a river.
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Enjoy every moment of your life!

Soren

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #48 on: January 29, 2013, 02:40:32 AM »
Mike - very different from mine which follows the description given by Troy! Interesting to be documenting the sprouting habit on this public forum.
Søren
Kampala, Uganda

fruitlovers

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Re: Junglesop (Annondium mannii) About time we dedicated a thread to this one!
« Reply #49 on: January 29, 2013, 03:28:13 AM »
Mike - very different from mine which follows the description given by Troy! Interesting to be documenting the sprouting habit on this public forum.

Different in what way?
Oscar

 

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