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Author Topic: Rubus sp.  (Read 597 times)

Terminalia

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Rubus sp.
« on: October 04, 2018, 09:22:11 AM »
Hi,

I have about 50 Rubus species (and hybrids) from many regions of the world (for example Rubus australis, a self fertile Rubus chamaemorus, Rubus ellipticus, Rubus niveus ...) and I┤m interested in exchange of experiences and plant materials. Please PM which species you are interested in and which you may offer.

KarenRei

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2018, 04:44:28 PM »
Do you offer any simply for sale?  And just cuttings, or seeds? I find Rubus chingii v. suavissimus (formerly R. suavissimus) a rather interesting plant, in that in addition to berries it contains a natural sugar-free sweetener in the leaves (ruboside, >5%; it's related to steviol). Used in Guanxi to brew tian-cha, a sweet tea. Do you have that one?
 
« Last Edit: October 05, 2018, 04:47:47 PM by KarenRei »
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Terminalia

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2018, 04:39:21 PM »
I┤m interested in exchange only - informations and plant materials (cuttings, seeds in saison....). Rubus you are interested in is available in my country and I have a plant from that rubus species.

KarenRei

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2018, 10:27:37 PM »
Are you only interested in Rubus species in exchange?  I can certainly order species online (although with a collection as large as yours, you probably have most everything!). Or if you have interest in non-Rubus species, I could collect some of our local edible wild berries (mainly Vaccinium uliginosum (blßber / bog bilberry), Vaccinium myrtillus (a­alblßber / bilberry), Empetrum nigrum (krŠkiber / crowberry); there's a couple others (hr˙taber / stone bramble, jar­arber / wild strawberries, skollaber / dwarf cornel), but they're not common). And some Ribes species, but they're only semi-wild. And ever common rowan berries, but they're not great, even when processed right  ;)  Everyone's favourites are usually the blßber and krŠkiber species.  The blßber species might be hard to find this time of year, but there's probably a few hanging onto plants. Crowberries should be abundant.

Hmm, now that I think of it... hr˙taber / stone bramble is a Rubus. R. saxatilis. But I doubt I could find any this time of year.  I always think of them as kind of insignificant, I've never found a lot of berries in one location.  But they'd probably do better in cultivation than the wild.
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Terminalia

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2018, 09:19:54 AM »
Arctic berries sounds interesting also  :). I don┤t know if Empetrum hermaphroditum grows in your country.
My rubus saxatilis plants are on the way to winter rest also now. Does Rubus nessensis grows in Iceland ? I only can find that it grows in Norway.

KarenRei

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2018, 09:21:16 PM »
E. hermaphroditum is considered a subspecies of E. nigrum.  I have no clue which subspecies the ones here are (is there a way to tell them apart?).  E. nigrum (of whatever subspecies) is crazy abundant here. Endless plains of the stuff.  A third of my land is dominated by it. It's very hardy and tolerates very poor soil conditions.  Practically invulnerable to anything except being overgrown (it's a very low plant); the only thing here hardier than it is moss, or maybe the blˇ­berg (wild thyme /Thymus praecox). Crowberry season is longer than bilberry season; crowberries  sometimes persist on the plants through the entire winter, although they're best before the first frost, and you'd never eat ones that have been on the plant all winter.

Hmm... I've never heard of Rubus nessensis being native here... but then again I have come across some sort of raspberry-like berry growing wild in the forests near Esja.  Might be an escapee or accidentally introduced species, I don't know. It only grows where there's woods; it apparently needs the shelter.  I should give them a better look late next spring / summer when they're back in leaf  :)
« Last Edit: October 07, 2018, 09:29:00 PM by KarenRei »
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Terminalia

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2018, 07:54:28 AM »
Empetrum hermaphroditum is self fertile in contrast to Empetrum nigrum. I┤m not sure if E. hermaphroditum grows in Iceland. But perhaps it┤s available in nurseries/a nursery.
If possible it would be very kind if you could take pictures of Rubus plants you discovered/you know about. I┤m curious to identify species.

Are you interested in to buy a R. chingi plant directly by nursery if possible ?  (I may ask if they send to Iceland)

KarenRei

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2018, 10:33:47 AM »
Wish there was an easy way to tell the difference on E. nigrum/hermaphroditum.  Maybe surround a plant with mesh and see if it fruits?  ;)

We're starting to get cold weather here (had a layer of slush on my windshield this morning), so I imagine I should probably wait until next year (or a warm spell) before buying live plants.  But it's nice to know that there are nurseries out there with R. chingi v. suavissimus out there; I didn't know whether it would be hard to get or not.
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Terminalia

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2018, 11:22:37 AM »
To find a E. hermaphroditum plant in nature would be a bigger challenge. I assume best way to find are nurseries.

There seems to be only one nursery in Europe which sells R. chingi. But they don┤t dispatch to Iceland I know by now.

KarenRei

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2018, 01:15:38 PM »
To find a E. hermaphroditum plant in nature would be a bigger challenge. I assume best way to find are nurseries.


Just found this from Listigar­ur Akureyrar about E. nigrum ssp. hermaphroditum:

http://www.lystigardur.akureyri.is/default.aspx?modID=16&pId=3593&fl=1

"Algeng um land allt og ■ß ekki sÝst til fjalla. Ínnur nßtt˙ruleg heimkynni t.d.: ArktÝsk, Kanada, N AmerÝka, Evrˇpa (sÚrstakl. SkandinavÝa)"

Which is: "Widespread around the whole country and not least into the mountains. Other natural ranges include e.g. the arctic, Canada, North America, Europe (esp. Scandinavia)"

Apparently there are some visible differences between the two, not just the flowers - for example, the berries have the remains of stamens on the bottom.

I also found this:

https://www.ni.is/biota/plantae/anthophyta/empetrum-nigrum

Says:

"KrŠkilyngi­ skiptist Ý tvŠr deilitegundir, ssp. nigrum sem hefur einkynja blˇm og finnst a­eins ß lßglendi og spp. hermaphroditum sem hefur tvÝkynja blˇm og grˇfari bl÷­, h˙n er s˙ deilitegund sem er miklu algengari hÚr, bŠ­i til fjalla og ß lßglendi."

Which is:

"Crowberry bushes can be divided into two subdivisions, ssp. nigrum which has unisexual flowers and can only be found in the lowlands, and spp. hermaphroditum which has bisexual flowers and coarser leaves; this is the subdivision which is much more common here, both in the mountains and the lowlands."

I'll check which ones grow on my land the next time I'm out there.  Huh, I've really learned something in this thread, I always thought that crowberries here were just one variety  :)  It's funny, if I go to images.google.com and search for "krŠkiber" I can clearly see that in some pictures all the berries have staminar remnants, while others clearly have none.  Apparently the proper names are krŠkilyng / krŠkiber for ssp. nigrum and krummalyng / krummaber for ssp. hermaphroditum, although I've never heard anyone use that term.  Other distinguishing characteristics beyond the stamnar remnants are wider, more elliptical leaves, and coarser stems which do not branch off roots. The berries are also slightly larger.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2018, 05:17:56 PM by KarenRei »
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Terminalia

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2018, 04:25:51 PM »
Thanks KarenRei for all your reseach !

According to my information it was not sure that E. hermaphroditum occurs in Iceland┤s flora. Besides Empetrum hermaphroditum berries being a little bit larger, do you get any information about fruit quality differences between E. n. var. nigrum and E. n. hermaphroditum ?

KarenRei

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Re: Rubus sp.
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2018, 07:59:27 AM »
Thanks KarenRei for all your reseach !

According to my information it was not sure that E. hermaphroditum occurs in Iceland┤s flora. Besides Empetrum hermaphroditum berries being a little bit larger, do you get any information about fruit quality differences between E. n. var. nigrum and E. n. hermaphroditum ?

I've been meaning to head out to my land but the weather's not been too great, and the evening is now too short after work to get much done, so that mainly pushes me off to weekends.  I want to do a berry survey while I'm there next time  ;) 

Unfortunately, I didn't find anything out about eating quality except for size.  Given that most people here seem completely unaware that there's two entirely different types of crowberries, they can't be that different!  ;)
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