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Author Topic: Arctic Frost beginning to come back  (Read 102 times)

SoCal2warm

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Arctic Frost beginning to come back
« on: June 26, 2018, 03:21:27 PM »
planted out in the ground in mid-March, while the little tree was just beginning to set fruits. The tree could not take the cold temperatures (not freezing though) and completely defoliated, all except one tiny leaf. Most of the branches died back.
But now it's beginning to push out growth.

Pacific Northwest, zone 8a

(will have to show pictures later, it's too slow right now)






SoCal2warm

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Re: Arctic Frost beginning to come back
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2018, 03:28:45 PM »
 
« Last Edit: June 26, 2018, 03:38:10 PM by SoCal2warm »

TooFarNorth

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Re: Arctic Frost beginning to come back
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2018, 03:51:41 PM »
I planted 3 Arctic Frost last spring. One bloomed profusely, one had a few blooms that dropped when fruit was small and the third one just sat there. They did well during Winter and are growing well, but none bloomed this year. Maybe next spring I will get to try one.

TFN

SoCal2warm

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Re: Arctic Frost beginning to come back
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2018, 05:17:36 PM »
I planted 3 Arctic Frost last spring. They did well during Winter and are growing well,
Yes, but I'm in the PNW. The winters here are probably just a tiny bit milder than where you are, and we don't really have cold snaps, but the big issue is the prolonged cool to cold temperatures that last so long throughout the first part of the year. Some say it's almost like we don't have a real Spring season. The citrus did not really begin showing any signs of growth until late May to early June, with the exception of a Satsuma mandarin that was covered in plastic sheeting in a cold frame, when we had a short bout of unusually warm temperatures in April.

I'm not concerned as much about the Winter freeze as I am the constantly cold temperatures that follow for months afterwards. None of this cold is actually freezing, but it seems the citrus have difficulty dealing with it and it does cause leaf drop. I do expect, however, that once every 4 to 8 years there might be a really cold winter, but even those wouldn't be anything unusual for zone 7.

The problem isn't so much cold events, it's overall lack of warmth.

 

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