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Author Topic: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix  (Read 588 times)

Triloba Tracker

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Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« on: July 02, 2018, 11:48:03 AM »
I have a couple potted trees that have been grown in Al's Gritty Mix.
I want to plant them in the ground - would there be issues just planting with whatever Mix remains intact around the roots, or should I estentially bare-root the plant?
I was concerned about the radical soil differential by having essentially gravel around the root ball and then native soil around, which has a fair amount of clay.



spaugh

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2018, 02:41:29 PM »
No need to remove the potting soil.  Would do more harm than good.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2018, 04:03:11 PM »
No need to remove the potting soil.  Would do more harm than good.
Even though itís gravel, Turface, and pine bark? Nothing even close to soil (except at a molecular level) LOL

boxturtle

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2018, 01:03:57 AM »
what type of trees? generally you don't want to disturb the rootball like spaugh said you better off just putting into the  ground with the mix...the mix won't do it any harm if anything it might encourage  your tree to root out more. 

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2018, 06:38:54 AM »
what type of trees? generally you don't want to disturb the rootball like spaugh said you better off just putting into the  ground with the mix...the mix won't do it any harm if anything it might encourage  your tree to root out more.
Thanks! I can see what youíre saying.
These are asimina triloba (pawpaw) trees which, according to most literature, really donít like their roots disturbed.
Itís a hard call...

ScottR

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2018, 10:49:24 AM »
Triloba, i would cut you pot's in a way that you can sent them into planting hole a carefully remove cut pot from your tree's and have native soil around to stabilize root ball! You right paw paw hate to have there roots disturbed!
Good luck ;)

Mark in Texas

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2018, 12:29:34 PM »
If there's root spin out, take the tree out and score/cut top to bottom 1/2" deep 4 times around the rootball.  This will break up the spin out and induce fibrous branching.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 07:46:30 AM by Mark in Texas »

TNAndy

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2018, 12:53:38 PM »
Remember to dig a hole three times the diameter of the rootball of the tree.  I think mixing half soil and half container mix and using that for the fill dirt is a good idea.  That way, you won't have as much of a barrier to root growth.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2018, 07:49:52 AM »
Remember to dig a hole three times the diameter of the rootball of the tree.  I think mixing half soil and half container mix and using that for the fill dirt is a good idea.  That way, you won't have as much of a barrier to root growth.

Quite the opposite if in clay.  You will not only have an artificially created barrier (roots will stay confined to the hole) but the tree will soon rot, drown.  Never amend backfill.  https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf


Triloba Tracker

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2018, 09:13:31 AM »
Yep, definitely not gonna do that

I think Iíll probably just let come what may with these seedlings- whatever gritty mix falls off will fall off, what remains will be going into the ground.

Though I have barerooted and repotted Asimina triloba seedlings before with no outright casualties. Itís possible it stunted them a bit.

Triphal

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2018, 09:58:50 AM »
1. It is better you plant them in the spring. 2. Plant them closer about 4 feet from each other. 3. Needs full to partial sunlight after about 4 years. Till then you have to use protect from direct sunlight. 4. Dig 3 feet x 3 feet square and 3 feet deep two holes. 5. Mix the dug out soil with 1/3 of it's quantity with some compost of your choice. *Please note that Pawpaw plants like mild acidic soil. 6.Thoroughly water the hole day before planting 7. Fill the hole with the dug up mixed soil and plant your container plant without disturbing the roots. ** Do not forget that they have long tap root!. 8. Make sure you plant it about 2 inches above the ground level. 9. Use two 6 to 8 feet long wooden or metal stakes on either side for temporary support. 9. Press the soil tamp gently so that there are no major air pockets. 10. Gently water it till it is fully wet. 11.Taper some extra garden soil from the trunk down to 4 feet to the ground level like a mound. 12. Mulch the collected garden leaves. 13. Six 8 feet metal posts covering 8 x 4 feet area to cover for shade. This you need for about 4 years. 14. DO NOT PUT any fertilizer while planting and the first 2 - 3 years. This is my personal experience with Pawpaw. I have 3 grafted trees this way and they have been yielding about 1000 ( thousand ) fruits annually! Planted it for wild life. Only deer and racoons get to it.
***Our plants are 3 miles away from a river bank and about 300 feet above the river bank level. Our deep water table is around 100 feet but we keep the plants well hydrated through the surface roots.

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2018, 10:18:01 AM »
Thanks for the info, Triphal - i am good with how to grow Asimina triloba - my question was not really specific to this species.

It was more about the wisdom of planting "gritty mix" in the ground. Gritty mix is a soil-less mix of crushed granite, calcined clay (Turface), and screened pine bark.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2018, 10:28:59 AM »
This is my "gritty mix", tractor style - builder's sand, peat moss, compost, vermiculite or perlite, blood meal, pine bark.....whatever I have stockpiled outside and in the barn.



You guys busting your asses with shade cloth and such can shade in less than a minute with a spray of Surround, cheap too.

http://www.novasource.com/en/products/surround

Triphal

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #13 on: November 08, 2018, 10:34:01 AM »
Thanks. Completely missed your query on 'gritty Mix'!

Triloba Tracker

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #14 on: November 08, 2018, 10:50:52 AM »
You guys busting your asses with shade cloth and such can shade in less than a minute with a spray of Surround, cheap too.

http://www.novasource.com/en/products/surround


Very interesting - never heard of Surround. I have heard of painting trunks to prevent southwest injury in the winter, but this sounds like it could be useful for sunscald prevention on fruit.

Asimina triloba seems to only need shade for a short period, then thrives in full sun. But fruit can be subject to sunburn (like most anything, i suppose).
Will keep this product in mind - thanks for the tip!

hawkfish007

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #15 on: November 08, 2018, 11:03:35 AM »
Remember to dig a hole three times the diameter of the rootball of the tree.  I think mixing half soil and half container mix and using that for the fill dirt is a good idea.  That way, you won't have as much of a barrier to root growth.

Quite the opposite if in clay.  You will not only have an artificially created barrier (roots will stay confined to the hole) but the tree will soon rot, drown.  Never amend backfill.  https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf

Any advice for soil that is completely dead? I would like to use native soil when planting but after looking at the soil I am leaning toward mixing it with worm castings at 50:50 ratio.

This is what I dug up.



Standing water after 5 days, I dug the hole even bigger and mixed native soil with cactus soil amendment.



hawkfish007

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #16 on: November 08, 2018, 11:06:49 AM »
Remember to dig a hole three times the diameter of the rootball of the tree.  I think mixing half soil and half container mix and using that for the fill dirt is a good idea.  That way, you won't have as much of a barrier to root growth.

Quite the opposite if in clay.  You will not only have an artificially created barrier (roots will stay confined to the hole) but the tree will soon rot, drown.  Never amend backfill.  https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf

Any advice for soil that is completely dead? I would like to use native soil when planting but after looking at the soil I am leaning toward mixing it with worm castings at 50:50 ratio.

This is what I dug up.



Standing water after 5 days, I dug the hole even bigger and mixed native soil with cactus soil amendment.



Edit: this is to plant mango and other subtropical trees in Zone 9B.

zephian

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2018, 11:45:02 AM »
Remember to dig a hole three times the diameter of the rootball of the tree.  I think mixing half soil and half container mix and using that for the fill dirt is a good idea.  That way, you won't have as much of a barrier to root growth.

Quite the opposite if in clay.  You will not only have an artificially created barrier (roots will stay confined to the hole) but the tree will soon rot, drown.  Never amend backfill.  https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/soil-amendments.pdf

Any advice for soil that is completely dead? I would like to use native soil when planting but after looking at the soil I am leaning toward mixing it with worm castings at 50:50 ratio.

This is what I dug up.



Standing water after 5 days, I dug the hole even bigger and mixed native soil with cactus soil amendment.



Edit: this is to plant mango and other subtropical trees in Zone 9B.
I have an area in my yard that looks just as lifeless (Though it drains way better than that....) I tilled it (yeah yeah, soil life destroyed, etc) and layed about 8 inches of mulch on top. Even after two weeks my soil has changed dramatically. I plan on mulching heavily until spring before I even plant here.
-Kris

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2018, 12:21:32 PM »
Zephian - Iíd be cautious with overdoing the mulch.
I went gonzo with wood chip mulch in an area for several months, then planted trees and Iím convinced the too-thick mulch suffocated and drowned the trees.


zephian

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2018, 01:55:48 PM »
Zephian - Iíd be cautious with overdoing the mulch.
I went gonzo with wood chip mulch in an area for several months, then planted trees and Iím convinced the too-thick mulch suffocated and drowned the trees.
I'll keep your advice in mind and check my soil conditions come spring. I'll be mounding the soil and planting above the ground level pulling back the mulch as I go. My mulch (woodchips/tree trimmings) is very fresh and should break down a couple of inches at least.
-Kris

DSotM

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2018, 08:38:04 PM »
Zephian - Iíd be cautious with overdoing the mulch.
I went gonzo with wood chip mulch in an area for several months, then planted trees and Iím convinced the too-thick mulch suffocated and drowned the trees.

Same here. Especially with clay, it can keep the soil waterlogged. Lost sapote, papaya, and a mango to this =/

Iím still going to keep the mulch because of how beneficial it is, but Iím just going to water with caution from now on.

spaugh

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2018, 08:40:50 PM »
The mulch has the opposite effect here.  It helps hold in moisture which my soil needs.  Plants do way better with it than without.  It all comes down to your soil type and your annual rainfall.  If you have heavy clay soil its likely to be a problem with or without the mulch.
Brad Spaugh

zephian

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2018, 01:07:06 AM »
I'm in california... what is rain? lol...been in a drought for like 10 years up here. (Besides two years ago when a dam nearly broke and threatened to flood my city...)
I have water restrictions and very high water rates in the summer. Ill keep all the moisture I can.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 01:12:12 AM by zephian »
-Kris

Mark in Texas

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2018, 08:05:40 AM »
Any advice for soil that is completely dead? I would like to use native soil when planting but after looking at the soil I am leaning toward mixing it with worm castings at 50:50 ratio.

Plant in a raised bed, mound and NEVER amend tight "soils" with anything.  By returning the native "stuff" back to the hole you seal the top against migration of standing water.   You'd be a good candidate for the raised beds I use - RootBuilder.

My Reed avocado is in a 100 gal. bottomless "pot" a raised bed over tight heavy clay.  After it froze back to a stump it grew to 10' X 10' in 7 months, since March.




Mark in Texas

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Re: Planting trees grown in Gritty Mix
« Reply #24 on: November 10, 2018, 08:08:24 AM »
Zephian - Iíd be cautious with overdoing the mulch.
I went gonzo with wood chip mulch in an area for several months, then planted trees and Iím convinced the too-thick mulch suffocated and drowned the trees.

Yep, if you don't have internal drainage you must at least have surface drainage. 

 

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