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Author Topic: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection  (Read 831 times)

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #25 on: July 21, 2018, 11:42:21 PM »
And there are two varieties of dioscorea bulbifera, yellow and purple. You can see it here:

  https://come-se.blogspot.com/2011/09/cara-moela-frito-dois-em-um.html
https://come-se.blogspot.com/2012/09/cara-moela-coluna-do-paladar-4.html
https://come-se.blogspot.com/2012/05/cara-moela-roxo-bem-apimentado.html

Yummy!!!   :P :P :P

Interesting, I've seen purple Asian types, but I hadn't seen a purple African type before (though I had read about it). They seem to cook it with the skin, and in some cases even eat the skin. I had thought the skin was inedible.

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Also, to clarify something said earlier, Grower Jim hasn't been contacted (just referenced), the contact is someone else. As for Jim, he doesn't seem to sell bulbifera on his site, but he might be worth trying.

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2018, 11:52:21 AM »
Well, my D. pentaphylla bulbils finally arrived in the mail and I am thoroughly satisfied. I'm obviously still concerned (it's not safe until I see some proper new growth), but they arrived very well packaged and in excellent condition, sprouted and alive! They still don't have leaves, but the very fuzzy stem (a characteristic of their subgenus) indicates that they are in-fact the real deal. I recommend this seller, they were helpful when contacted and they've sent a good product. They said that they don't eat the bulbils (no confirmation of toxicity), but that the tuber is eaten steamed.

One of the slips had fallen off the bulbil, and I accidentally knocked off a second one (with very little effort) but the third was intact. The two slips were treated with rooting hormone to give them an extra boost, and all three of them (plus the now-soft slipless bulbils) were temporarily planted in a tall-ish pot, completely covering the shoots with soil to allow them to acclimate to the local humidity. If bulbil production is low this season, I'll probably just propagate them, but if there's a surplus, I'll add it to my stock.



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In other news, the Elephant-foot Yam bulblets (Amorphophallus paeoniifolius) arrived a couple of days ago, and I planted them in small pots to fully sprout them. I have been soaking the Ensete ventricosum seeds since Friday (changing the water mornings and evenings), and planted one yesterday; I'll keep soaking them until this Friday (following the example of another person who had success with them), planting out one seed per day in the meantime, to hedge my bets against the possibility of excessive soaking. And finally, my Ube is resprouting from the stump, so it looks like that was the way to go! Once it starts growing a little more vigorously again, I'll plant it back in the tote where I had it in the first place, next to the Florido yam.

The Ube:


00christian00

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #27 on: August 01, 2018, 04:37:00 AM »
If you are looking for the African Dioscorea Bulbifera I found it from Stephward nursery :
https://www.stephward.co.za/

You need to send him a whatsapp message, cause they are not on the website(mobile number is on the bottom).
I paid 31 usd for 5 small bulbils and 1 big sent in 2 packages. Sent in one package was around 20 usd, but the big one is going to attract more attention so I preferred to ship it separately.

Chupa King

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #28 on: August 01, 2018, 01:34:21 PM »




Any idea what this could be? Bought it at a farmers market. White flesh. I was told maybe a Mountain yam but I havnt had them before. I can take more pictures when it grows full leaves.

Mahalo
Biodiversity is key.

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #29 on: August 02, 2018, 03:18:37 PM »
If you are looking for the African Dioscorea Bulbifera I found it from Stephward nursery :
https://www.stephward.co.za/

You need to send him a whatsapp message, cause they are not on the website(mobile number is on the bottom).
I paid 31 usd for 5 small bulbils and 1 big sent in 2 packages. Sent in one package was around 20 usd, but the big one is going to attract more attention so I preferred to ship it separately.

Thank you very much! I have contacted them and am in the process of placing an order.






Any idea what this could be? Bought it at a farmers market. White flesh. I was told maybe a Mountain yam but I havnt had them before. I can take more pictures when it grows full leaves.

Mahalo

Was the root large or rather small? I'm finding it hard to place with what I'm seeing, but I have a suspicion that it might be D. esculenta ("S" twist, prickly stem, alternating mature leaves, potato-like clusters of tubers at harvest). The prickles reminded me of my D. rotundata, but the leaves and stem look different. "Mountain Yam" should refer to the three temperate climate species (polystachya, japonica, hamiltonii), but common names aren't always trustworthy, and the anatomy in the photos contradicts all three of those. D. nummularia has a prickly base, but also paired mature leaves and a "Z" twist, so I'm not sure; the twist isn't visible in this photo, and the leaves are from the stem base, so their current configuration might not be reliable. For now, it might be an esculenta. By all means, keep the photos coming, I'm very intrigued.

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #30 on: August 06, 2018, 12:11:24 PM »
The African bulbiferas are on their way, and the Asian ones I got from "Rare Palm Seeds" arrived at my sister's house with the Erythrina edulis (I haven't seen them in person yet). 11 bulbils (and 11 Chachafruto seeds), but judging by the photos my sister sent, they don't look much like bulbiferas... The stems look a bit square and the appearance of the bulbils is a bit off. I'll be documenting everything, and if the anatomy corresponds with something else as it grows, I'll be letting the company know. I don't mind growing extra yams, but I'm already up to my neck in alatas, I don't really need more of those (even the purple Ube sprouted back nicely). I found a feral one growing out back from a bulbil (yellowish flesh, purple-tinged stems), and I stuck it in the Florido's tub. Which reminds me...

I finally found someone to help clear the back hillside! Progress is smooth, if a bit slow. When the work is finished, I'll be planting the area with everything I can find. Root crops, N-fixers, soil stabilizers, Plantains, Yams, Sweet Potatoes (which will help as a ground-cover), and of course, my long-suffering potted fruit trees. I have a few Calliandra calothyrsus seeds saved over from my stint in Utuado university, and I'll probably use them to stabilize a drop-off (caused by a machine fixing an electrical post). I'm thinking of getting some sterile Comfrey to help with the soil building, and I'll probably be using some of my Chachafruto trees for chop-n-drop. I'll be using the path left by the machine for a breeding experiment, which leads me to...

Potatoes! I've tried to grow the store-bought yellow potatoes for years, but even if I chit them, they always rot. I tried a red-skinned and a blue-skinned tuber a few weeks ago, and I finally have a healthy-growing plant in the Florido tub! I don't expect heavy yields, but I'll be satisfied if I get anything. Regarding the experiment, I posted about it in another forum, but I placed a request for several diploid potatoes (Skagit Valley Gold, DTO-2, DTO-28, RN27.01 and M6) to the US National Plant Germplasm System, and they're preparing the in-vitro plants to ship to me (plus some S. cardiophyllum & S. ehrenbergii seeds for good measure). I'll be using them to breed potatoes for the tropics (SVG is disease resistant and maybe heat tolerant, the DTO's are heat tolerant, the RN is purplish-red and super-high in antioxidants, and M6 is a toxic but self-fertile S. chacoense - and if I use it as the pollen parent, there should be no concern of cytoplasmic male sterility; the other two will be bred separately as another edible potato species, although I will be mixing some with the rest of my Phurejas).

Finally, my Hodgsonia macrocarpa seeds arrived, and I've planted them in their own tub (I'll give them their own post of they sprout), with the newly finished trellis! They'll be sharing that trellis with the D. polystachya (I found a survivor!), and possibly with the newer yams.

A gallery of all in question:

The back hillside in-progress:




The Ube & the Chinese Yam (in that order):




The RPS "┐Bulbiferas?" & Chachafruto (in that order):




The Red Potato:




The Hodgsonia macrocarpa seeds and their trellis:


00christian00

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2018, 01:15:22 PM »

Potatoes! I've tried to grow the store-bought yellow potatoes for years.


Very strange, for me they sprout even from some small peel in the compost.
If you let the potato sit at room temperature without soil it will start to sprout by itself, they really need no care.

Where did you get your Hodgsonia? I have some seeds coming from Roy-Ind.


Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2018, 05:33:26 PM »

Potatoes! I've tried to grow the store-bought yellow potatoes for years.


Very strange, for me they sprout even from some small peel in the compost.
If you let the potato sit at room temperature without soil it will start to sprout by itself, they really need no care.

Where did you get your Hodgsonia? I have some seeds coming from Roy-Ind.

Sprouting the potatoes has never been a problem for me, even the yellow ones. But regardless of whether I planted them sprouted or not, they would always end up rotting. I think it might be the heat. The red ones are said to grow better here anyway.

My Hodgsonia was from Roy as well. I hope to get at least one male and one female to flowering age, otherwise I'll neither be able to taste nor multiply them (the latter being more important than the former, for now).

chirpis

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #33 on: August 08, 2018, 10:17:58 AM »
Did my purple yam post start you down this road? :)

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #34 on: August 08, 2018, 09:32:58 PM »
Did my purple yam post start you down this road? :)


It was a catalyst. I had already decided on acquiring the Ube, and I was already reviewing my yam collection at the moment and looking over the literature, but your post reminded me, so I went to eBay in search of it. And that was all it took... First the Ube, then I went in search of the rest. So thank you!  ;)

I was also reviewing staple crops and have been checking out perennials in the permaculture literature, thus my emphasis on the Air Potato. And in one such article (link here), they also mentioned Mesquite as a highly productive perennial staple. Furthermore, in the comments of a separate article (link here), they mentioned Prosopis pallida, P. glandulosa, P. velutina, P. cineraria, and especially P. alba as being the most palatable species, with P. alba being sweeter, non-thorny, non-invasive, and being superior animal forage. Well wouldn't you know it, soon after reading this, I found Rare Palm Seeds was selling seeds of a superior selection of P. alba (link here, description here). I hope to be able to acquire seeds of it while they still have it in stock. I may have to make a separate thread for staples. I'm actually hoping to have a good set of crops to keep myself fed without depending on the supermarket (more like self-reliance than full-on survivalism). I feel the topic deserves to be explored. But for now, I'll focus on the yam collection. ;D

 

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