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Author Topic: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection  (Read 7292 times)

fyliu

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #50 on: September 13, 2018, 12:40:22 PM »
What's a mountain yam? scientific name?
I think it's a common name that could represent 1 or more species. Japanese call their long white yam yamaimo (yama=mountain, imo=yam). I'm not sure if other cultures use the same common name for their native yam as well.

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #51 on: September 18, 2018, 07:18:59 PM »
We might be able to identify the mountain yam from pictures, but that common name is very generic, so if it turns out to have an alternative, we should use it.

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Iím going to have to try again with a few of them next year. My pentaphylla and pseudo-tomentosa died off, the hamiltonii failed to sprout, and I didnít reach the business in time to acquire the japonica bulbils. On the bright side, the Ube, the yellow cayennensis and the polystachya are doing just fine. Whatís more, the crop on the Indian bulbifera is just starting to take off; more on that in its own thread.

My African bulbiferaís arrived sprouted and in excellent condition. I buried them in a small pot for the moment; tomorrow Iíll get another tub ready and place it by the new trellis.

Hereís mine:



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Edit: I forgot to mention: the trifida doesnít play well with others. All the other species are competing for space and growing vigorously (though Iím sure yields will suffer). Meanwhile, the trifidas are failing to put on extensive vine growth, and I donít expect a good harvest. For anyone growing trifidas out there, give them their space, donít crowd them.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2018, 07:47:53 PM by Caesar »

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #52 on: September 23, 2018, 03:32:50 PM »
Please see my Air Potato post here for an important announcement. This concerns you too, 00christian00

BajaJohn

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #53 on: September 28, 2018, 11:50:52 PM »
The Papas Voldoras from Las Canada's seem to have taken off. Some of the shoots are already about 6 feet long. The Beauregard didn't make it.

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #54 on: September 29, 2018, 10:16:30 PM »
The Papas Voldoras from Las Canada's seem to have taken off. Some of the shoots are already about 6 feet long. The Beauregard didn't make it.

The Beauregard didn't handle the shipping stress well? How were they packaged? A root might have made the trip in better condition, but I guess they keep the roots as crops and just sell rooted cuttings.

It's great to hear the air potatoes are doing well for you. I think you may be the first person in the forum with that particular cultivar. But "papa voladora" is a pretty generic name, it's just air potato (or "flying potato"), so I think it's safe to assume that this clone is nameless. What would you name it?

pineislander

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #55 on: October 01, 2018, 06:06:34 AM »


Edit: I forgot to mention: the trifida doesnít play well with others. All the other species are competing for space and growing vigorously (though Iím sure yields will suffer). Meanwhile, the trifidas are failing to put on extensive vine growth, and I donít expect a good harvest. For anyone growing trifidas out there, give them their space, donít crowd them.
My Trifida is also the least vigorous of my varieties. These were from grocery store-bought roots and may have been deteriorated in shipping so my home-grown roots may do better next season.

Also, the purple ube Alata yam I am growing had begun to climb on some other nearby trees and some vines were on the ground.
As I trimmed them back I noticed that vines touching the ground had begun to root at the nodes. This looks like it might be another way of propagation by air layering. So, if you'd like to try I'd suggest using sphagnum moss, coconut fiber, or similar media well moistened and wrapped with aluminum foil at nodes to get new plants.

Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #56 on: October 17, 2018, 07:57:57 PM »
I'm gonna try that with my Ube, to focus on sending the bulbils to other growers. In fact, I won't be harvesting the tuber for at least a few years. I wanna make the vine grow strong and vigorous, to ramp up its bulbil production.

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I have saturated myself with projects. The yams are all fine, but my second attempt at in-vitro potatoes for breeding was a disaster, and I didn't get to collect raspberry pollen for my hybrid experiment with the strawberry.

Here are the two surviving in-vitro potatoes, Skagit Valley Gold and Unica. I got the Unica as a tetraploid for reference, the rest were meant to be diploid, but I asked for a lot of tetraploids by mistake. They can be bred together, but them I'd have to rogue out triploids. They're sharing the tub with a pair of DTO varieties and a red phureja. I had poor luck with in-vitros, but I also asked for diploid seed and I expect to have better luck with seedlings, so the project isn't scrapped. The particular seeds are better adapted to my conditions anyway, compared to the in-vitro diploids, so that was a nice surprise.




But anyway, back to the yams. Here we have the base of the pvc trellis, showing everything I got growing around it. In the ground is a Barbados Gooseberry, then one bucket with the Ube one with the Nagaimo Yam, and then the two tubs, one with a struggling set of Hodgsonia + Jarilla, the other with the Sena Air Potato (reposted pic from the other thread). With said air potato are Recao, Mauka, Bambara Groundnut and a recently-planted Striped Peanut (not pictured).




Here's one of the Nagaimo Yams (D. polystachya) which I've since placed in the bucket with the rest. This one took a long time to come up from the roots. In fact, the Nagaimos are always the last to sprout in my yard, it's frustrating.




Some more recent pics of the Ube (note the stem looks slightly less red by now). I twined the Nagaimo over it, so it's a mess of leaves from both species, but the big Ube stem is easy to make out.




The Ube and the Air Potato twining around the trellis:




A leaf from the Yellow Guinea Yam that's growing on the bamboo trellis. This may be the prettiest yam I've yet grown (I don't have D. dodecaneura yet). It's dark green and tender-looking & glossy in leaf and stem. I hope it tastes as good as it looks.




The remaining pair of Mauka plants. I need to find a good place to plant them.




And finally, group photo: Elephant-foot Yams, Ensete ventricosum, Cerrado Cashew, rooted Florida Pistachio cuttings, and a Cyclophyllum coprosmoides (I have another in the ground).


Caesar

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Re: The Yam Checklist: Starting a Backyard Dioscorea Germplasm Collection
« Reply #57 on: November 03, 2018, 06:55:55 PM »
I'm selling some air potatoes now, with a few other things, in the vegetable buy/sell/trade section. Link here: http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=30268.0

 

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