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Author Topic: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal  (Read 5188 times)

EvilFruit

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #25 on: July 11, 2018, 12:01:46 PM »
The Egyptian agriculture department advises to spray potassium Silicate and Amino Acids to reduce the heat damage. Unfortunately i did not find potassium Silicate in here but, I have a silicone based surfactant which should be good source of silica too.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 12:04:10 PM by EvilFruit »
Moh'd

behlgarden

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #26 on: July 11, 2018, 03:47:36 PM »
I have lost 90% of all mango fruits. last year we had bad heat wave that took out over 75% of all cherimoyas. Hope its over for the year.

wslau

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #27 on: July 11, 2018, 08:01:44 PM »
I have lost 90% of all mango fruits. last year we had bad heat wave that took out over 75% of all cherimoyas. Hope its over for the year.

Sadly, similar reports amongst all our friends.  The damage took 3 days to fully assess/realize.
Warren

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #28 on: July 12, 2018, 01:29:15 AM »



Well looking at the lemon zest, it did take more damage to the new growth than I thought. But it still seems like it takes the heat much better than my sweet tart, and definitely Coconut Cream. Maybe about the same as Keitt and "manilla" mango. The Coconut Cream may be delicious but it isn't particularly tough. Doesn't seem to deal with the cold or extreme heat well.



I agree. My lemon zest flushed through the heat with no negative effects. You can see the flush with no spray on it. Thee are even new flushes today. Still going.




Something is having a negative effect on that LZ as it looks sickly...


Itís been in a pot for over a year and came through 1-2 minor frosts this year and is on turpentine rootstock. The fact that itís got some new growth is encouraging to me now that itís been in the ground for almost 2 months. No flowers in it though. Fruit punch has some fruit on it not affected by heat wave. Ambrosia growing well and has several flowers some have set fruit. I have a 20222 that has several mangoes but minimal vegetative growth or leaves after a large branch died off 3 months ago. Iím not sure if itís worth keeping that tree around or replacing it. Mallika lost some frutlets but is flowering again. Kesar holding onto small fruit but has very few leaves on it. Itís not a vigorous grower for me over here 2 seasons in a row now.

BestDay

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #29 on: July 12, 2018, 10:18:46 AM »
I was out of town for the heat wave so I couldn't adjust my watering or protect any plants.  I was told it reached almost 110 in Long Beach.  Amazingly only a couple plants got sun burned.  A couple of my blackberry plants wilted.  My Grumichama has burned leaves all over it and dropped a lot of fruit.  My two foot Sharwil Avocado also got burned badly.  A couple of my mangos got burned but nothing too bad.  And my Lemon Zest keeps dropping almost all its fruit.  They split and then drop off the tree but I guess that is for another post.

Bill

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #30 on: July 12, 2018, 10:28:02 AM »
I was out of town for the heat wave so I couldn't adjust my watering or protect any plants.  I was told it reached almost 110 in Long Beach.  Amazingly only a couple plants got sun burned.  A couple of my blackberry plants wilted.  My Grumichama has burned leaves all over it and dropped a lot of fruit.  My two foot Sharwil Avocado also got burned badly.  A couple of my mangos got burned but nothing too bad.  And my Lemon Zest keeps dropping almost all its fruit.  They split and then drop off the tree but I guess that is for another post.

Bill

We recently replaced our "dumb" sprinkler controller with a Rachio 3.  It's pretty awesome being able to adjust the watering schedule or do manual runs from anywhere.  It also uses local weather data to automatically adjust the schedule as well.  I would highly recommend looking into one, if you travel often.

simon_grow

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #31 on: July 12, 2018, 12:56:02 PM »
I was out of town for the heat wave so I couldn't adjust my watering or protect any plants.  I was told it reached almost 110 in Long Beach.  Amazingly only a couple plants got sun burned.  A couple of my blackberry plants wilted.  My Grumichama has burned leaves all over it and dropped a lot of fruit.  My two foot Sharwil Avocado also got burned badly.  A couple of my mangos got burned but nothing too bad.  And my Lemon Zest keeps dropping almost all its fruit.  They split and then drop off the tree but I guess that is for another post.

Bill

My LZ on Florida Turpentine rootstock did that for the first several years. After spraying it with a systemic Fungicide, it appears to be producing what appears to be normal Mangos without the cracking.

The temperatures have been very warm ever since the heat wave began and my plants are growing like crazy.

Simon

behlgarden

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #32 on: July 12, 2018, 01:14:01 PM »
I was out of town for the heat wave so I couldn't adjust my watering or protect any plants.  I was told it reached almost 110 in Long Beach.  Amazingly only a couple plants got sun burned.  A couple of my blackberry plants wilted.  My Grumichama has burned leaves all over it and dropped a lot of fruit.  My two foot Sharwil Avocado also got burned badly.  A couple of my mangos got burned but nothing too bad.  And my Lemon Zest keeps dropping almost all its fruit.  They split and then drop off the tree but I guess that is for another post.

Bill

We recently replaced our "dumb" sprinkler controller with a Rachio 3.  It's pretty awesome being able to adjust the watering schedule or do manual runs from anywhere.  It also uses local weather data to automatically adjust the schedule as well.  I would highly recommend looking into one, if you travel often.

I have rachio and yes it is awesome. by the time I realized we hit 117 it was too late. now I have on demand heat wave schedule turned on,.

barath

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #33 on: July 12, 2018, 10:03:52 PM »
Just checked on some small guava trees I had planted in a spot that hit 116 F two days in a row -- not only was there no damage, but they were green and happy.  (Meanwhile argan trees, which supposedly can handle desert heat, were scorched.)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 10:16:38 PM by barath »

Goyo626

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #34 on: July 12, 2018, 10:44:09 PM »
The worst sun damage ive seen on guava is to the fruit on the exposed side and some minor damage to leaves. The seem to be be very resilient trees.

behlgarden

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #35 on: July 12, 2018, 11:27:45 PM »
Guava is drought tolerant. Any drought tolerant tree fare better in heat waves.

zephian

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #36 on: July 16, 2018, 05:02:03 PM »
We hit about 110 here in norcal. I lost some seedlings that were too close to my window :( Also had some leave damage on my 4 in 1 cherry, and avocados trees and mangos. poor avocados are just trying to recover from too much water, now they're getting fried!
-Kris

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #37 on: July 17, 2018, 12:47:00 AM »
lost all my mangos.
i had a wax apple tree that was bursting with flowers this year...all burnt to a crisp. i see a few survivors hidden below though.
persimmon dropped a bunch of fruits
some avocado shriveled up
some avocado trees in pots lost all the leaves.
longan leaves got fried and lost some fruits
and i had a champaca tree that just got fried too.

figs took it like a champ though.

i don't quite ever remembering a heatwave like this before? but then i really started to pay attention to this 5-6 years ago. man..just brutal.

simon_grow

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #38 on: July 17, 2018, 10:16:23 PM »
The heatwave sucked! It killed back several of my new grafts and did this to my Dragonfruit.


Simon

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #39 on: July 17, 2018, 10:25:34 PM »
Simon - ouch - so sorry for that loss.

Can they be salvaged at all - maybe into smoothies even?

simon_grow

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #40 on: July 17, 2018, 11:02:56 PM »
I donít waste fruit so I will just cut off the exposed pieces and eat the rest. It sucks that the Fruit cracked so early because they havenít sugared up yet. This first fruit only had a Brix between 14-15% depending on which side I tested.

Simon

beicadad

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #41 on: July 18, 2018, 01:05:22 AM »
Simon, sorry to see that. Did the cracking happen like 10 days after the heatwave? I hope your loss is only limited to those in the pic

WaterFowler

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #42 on: July 18, 2018, 02:11:13 AM »
My Lemon Zest seemed to love the heat wave. And we are the 2nd hottest area in the nation next to Death Valley. The town I live in is literally called "Thermal". My LZ was only holding on to one fruit but looks like it will keep it til maturity. Picture is taken a top a step ladder about 10 days after heat wave. It burst out with growth right after it hit at least 122 degrees.



Victoria Ave

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #43 on: July 18, 2018, 11:56:36 AM »
Out here in Riverside I have my trees covered with 30% shade cloth (younger trees) and I thought they held up well to that heat wave. But over a couple days they started showing the damage black sun burns on stems, roasted new growth, shriveled and dropped all fruit and now my little Mallika looks like it may be dead.

That said it looks like the best may have kicked my lancetilla that has sat around and done nothing for almost a year into growth.

Should I leave the shade cloth up the rest of the summer or just let it best down on them?

My manilla in the ground with no protection got roasted too.... But not much worse than the others

WaterFowler

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #44 on: July 18, 2018, 04:49:20 PM »


My manilla in the ground with no protection got roasted too.... But not much worse than the others

The HD/LA Verne "manilla" mangos seems really tough up against the heat. I have 2 at my renters home, and they accidentally shut off the water while trying to adjust the irrigation timer during the summer last year. Trees had no water for almost 2 weeks during our typical 110 deg days. Killed a 7 foot Morena Sapodilla, an avocado, and a guava. The 2 manilla mangoes survived, and they are full sun all day long, no shade. This year they are holding onto 40+ fruits ea even though they are probably 8 feet tall max


Mike T

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #45 on: July 18, 2018, 07:28:28 PM »
The lack of humidity is perhaps as important as the temperature for species from summer rainfall peak climates. Some politicians say future summers wont be any hotter than current ones so it shouldn't get worse for the trees in the future.

gozp

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #46 on: July 18, 2018, 07:41:31 PM »
Out here in Riverside I have my trees covered with 30% shade cloth (younger trees) and I thought they held up well to that heat wave. But over a couple days they started showing the damage black sun burns on stems, roasted new growth, shriveled and dropped all fruit and now my little Mallika looks like it may be dead.

That said it looks like the best may have kicked my lancetilla that has sat around and done nothing for almost a year into growth.

Should I leave the shade cloth up the rest of the summer or just let it best down on them?

My manilla in the ground with no protection got roasted too.... But not much worse than the others

I wasnt here when the brutal heatwave occured & i lost the mangoes i have on sweetart and some minor leaf damage.



However, my 3 gals mango i received a month ago from florida took the brutal heatwave like a champ considering they get more sun than of the sweetart.




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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #47 on: July 18, 2018, 08:01:26 PM »
I also wasnít here to water during the heatwave... there is a lot of damage, Iím hoping most will survive. But there are a few trees that Iím not sure will make it.
[size=85]Sunset Zone: 21 ē USDA Zone: 10a ē AHS Heat Zone: 6-7[/size]

sapote

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #48 on: July 18, 2018, 08:40:18 PM »
My Lemon Zest seemed to love the heat wave. And we are the 2nd hottest area in the nation next to Death Valley. The town I live in is literally called "Thermal". My LZ was only holding on to one fruit but looks like it will keep it til maturity. Picture is taken a top a step ladder about 10 days after heat wave. It burst out with growth right after it hit at least 122 degrees.



Waterfowler: with no damages at 122F, I wonder if it was high humidity at yours? My area was 115F but dry and all of my mangoes had burned leaves and fruits. Just a month ago I said the LZ that Simon gave me the cuttings finally held about 5 larger fruits -- about 2 to 3" long -- and I thought I would have LZ to eat this year, but the heat dropped them all; even Glenn couldn't hold any fruits. I think if I had covered the trees with bed sheets then perhaps some fruits could survive.

DesertDreamer

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Re: Brutal heatwave 7/06/18 in Socal
« Reply #49 on: July 18, 2018, 09:56:01 PM »
Itís sounding like we AZ growers need to pass along a few tricks to our so. Cal brothers.  In no particular order....50% ( min) shade cloth on the west side for at least the first summer ( maybe two depending on growth rate).  Larger root mass= better survival rate, so I mostly plant 7 gal trees, minimum.  IF you have good drainage, mangos can handle a lot of water.  If not, they rot out during heatwaves when you water every two days.  I do DEEP watering three or four times in the spring to encourage deep rooting.
 I grow a variety of silica accumulating plants to use as mulch, Vetiver grass topping that list.  I also spray a few times in the spring to make sure the plant accumulated enough silica to withstand the heat.  I also have worked to develop a microclimate that provides shade and humidity.  Fast growing trees that can be chopped down in a few years are a great way of accomplishing this (morniga, tipu, ash,jacaranda, etc).
Plants have to be in good shape by the time June hits.  I will gladly sacrifice a little growth in the spring by not pushing fruiting too young in order to have a healthier tree with better caliper growth.
I dig planting holes a year in advance and provide a lot of drainage via gravel, stones, pumice, etc. mixed with my planting mix.  This allows compensation for settling, as well as establishment of fungal populations which can help augment roots.  I will also will plant in Fall and baby plants thru winter if they are slower growing varieties.  That gives a bit more root mass by the time June hits the next year.  I can more easily compensate for our cool temps than I can for our brutal, dry summers....Fast growers like LZ and Peach Cobbler always do better in our heat than slower varieties.  Dig BIG planting holes so roots can spread as fast as possible. 
As long as the trees are in good shape during heat, I continue to fertilize lightly with fish emulsion (50% of recommended rate).  This seems to allow for rapid recovery once our temps cool a bit and humidity rises again.  If not in good shape, focus on moisture management and just getting the tree to survive.  Danger zone is >105 and/or winds.  I ignore crispy leaves and any crisped new growth and focus on keeping soil moist, not soggy, and do a quick hand misting in the AM and evenings to provide some relief to the younger plants.
Finally, I find a bit of amino acids and maybe a little superthrive seems to help avoid the worst damage.  Absolutely avoid strong fertilization during heat.  Trying to help by adding too much Ďstuffí to your regimen is counter productive.
I hope this helps people.  We in AZ are in uncharted territory when it comes to growing mango, so I hope my observations can help others avoid the 10 years of mistakes I have made.
All views expressed are from my personal experience, in my particular conditions.  Your mileage may vary.

 

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