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Author Topic: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering  (Read 193 times)

marklee

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Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« on: July 10, 2018, 11:08:37 PM »
I've drenched this this with iron, added cottonseed meal and even lowered the PH of stored rain water. It is slowly starting to green up, but it is flowering profusely now. I'm hoping the flowers form into fruits. I've only got a few fruit to mature the last few seasons. Any ideas.


CA Hockey

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2018, 02:35:11 AM »
Mine was also chlorotic and new growth is greening up with nitrogen and micros. No flowers yet.

simon_grow

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2018, 08:28:54 AM »
Its hard to tell because I need to see more of the older leaves on the bottom and compare it to the new leaves on top but it appears to be lacking Iron, Magnesium, Zinc and Nitrogen. This combination is frequently associated with nutrient lock from use of hard tap water combined with chemical fertilizers. If you see white salt build up around the top waterline or the bottom drainage holes, that is another indication.

If its been in the same pot for a while, it may require re potting.

Simon

pineislander

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2018, 09:46:10 AM »
I planted two of these last year. I was worried when the first growth flush came out as it was such a light green color. I was sure the tree had adequate moisture and fertility and have come to realize that new growth flushes in this species can be expected to have very light green leaves until they harden off. Agree with what others here have said but it does look like great flowering. Just wanted to add about very light green flushes I experienced.

ScottR

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2018, 11:02:27 AM »
Best of luck on your flower crazy tree Mark, i have a couple small plants in ground one i got from Roger Meyer but nether have flowered :( ;)

greenman62

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2018, 09:28:01 AM »
ive had 3 (1 still alive -freeze killed the others)
they all  had been chlorotic at first
iron, magnesium and nitrogen greened them up.
im not sure which one is the culprit, maybe 2, or all 3, but it made a huge difference.
and it took several days to notice any change at all,

Nitrogen is mobile in the plant, so, you can see the difference in days.
iron is not, you have to wait for new growth.
(Magnesium is "Somewhat mobile")
https://nrcca.cals.cornell.edu/soilFertilityCA/CA1/CA1_print.html

too much magnesium can act as a salt and shrivel up leaves
too much of anything can lockout other nutrients. just an FYI.



marklee

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2018, 10:14:17 AM »
ive had 3 (1 still alive -freeze killed the others)
they all  had been chlorotic at first
iron, magnesium and nitrogen greened them up.
im not sure which one is the culprit, maybe 2, or all 3, but it made a huge difference.
and it took several days to notice any change at all,

Nitrogen is mobile in the plant, so, you can see the difference in days.
iron is not, you have to wait for new growth.
(Magnesium is "Somewhat mobile")
https://nrcca.cals.cornell.edu/soilFertilityCA/CA1/CA1_print.html

too much magnesium can act as a salt and shrivel up leaves
too much of anything can lockout other nutrients. just an FYI.

Thanks for the information

KarenRei

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2018, 11:46:20 AM »
Have you checked your soil pH?  It's easy enough to acidify soil if you need to. Sulfuric acid (often sold as drain cleaner) is the fastest, albeit harshest way.  Sulfur is the slowest (up to a year), but gentlest way.  In either case, it doesn't take much.

(I got my first *quality* soil pH meter recently, and it's like having my eyes opened, when I was stumbling around blind before trying to guess what was needed or relying on cheapo meters that led me to harm my plants as much as they led me to help them.  Too bad there's no affordable, quality meters for macro and micronutrients!)
J, g er a rkta surnar plntur slandi. Nei, g er ekki klikku. Jja, kannski...

Fygee

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2018, 11:52:34 AM »
Which soil pH meter did you get KarenRei? Been looking to get one myself.
Continuing my journey to disprove those who say "You can't grow that in the desert" since 2013.

KarenRei

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Re: Choloric Peanut Butter fruit flowering
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2018, 09:17:54 AM »
Which soil pH meter did you get KarenRei? Been looking to get one myself.

Bluelab.  Not cheap, but based on my experience so far, 100% worth it.  You'll need a meter with soil probe, and a bottle of storage solution, pH 4 calibration solution, and pH 7 calibration solution.  Just keep the storage cap filled up to the line, and brush the probe tip with a toothbrush when you're done for the day before you cap it.  I had to consult their tech support at one point (long story short, I wasn't brushing the probe tip  ;)  ), and got a quick response, and they even offered to send me a replacement probe at no cost if their advice didn't work.   It of course did work.  :)  The probe holds calibration well (I periodically test with calibration solution just to make sure - there's virtually no drift) and gets consistent readings within a given pot.

My first time around testing all of my pots, there were some plants whose readings got a real "Holy heck, no wonder I've been getting those symptoms!" reaction out of me  ;)  I had two pots test in with a pH under 4!  I mean, fine if you're growing rooibos, but otherwise...  ;)  (that was BTW the result of me acidifying the soil based on bad readings from a junk pH meter  :  )

I just wish it was this easy to test for specific nutrients  ;)  Over the years I've come to realize a risk to growing plants in pots that never go outside: nutrient accumulation.  Plants use nutrients unevenly, and if the soil never gets washed through, you can have some build up to dangerous levels (yes, this has killed plants for me  :(  ).  I now make it a policy to regularly "wash through" the soil in my pots - akin to a person growing plants hydroponically changing out their solution at regular intervals. This isn't something that would ever affect people growing plants outside since rains regularly wash through pots.

« Last Edit: July 13, 2018, 09:23:58 AM by KarenRei »
J, g er a rkta surnar plntur slandi. Nei, g er ekki klikku. Jja, kannski...

 

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