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Author Topic: Avocado grafting  (Read 6341 times)

shaneatwell

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2018, 02:32:02 PM »
Newish Surinam. Just removed foil:



And feijoa




For greenwood on hardwood I plan to start trying saddle grafts as well. Should work better than cleft at least in terms of flexibility and in terms of water transport too.
Shane

artfusionfab

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #26 on: July 14, 2018, 02:50:24 PM »
what does the foil do?

shaneatwell

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #27 on: July 14, 2018, 02:57:10 PM »
Protects from heat and preserves rubber band.

If you meant in that picture...nothing much. I just wanted to leave it nearby if the new growth starts wilting again. But a week ago it was entirely shading the graft.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2018, 03:02:37 PM by shaneatwell »
Shane

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #28 on: July 14, 2018, 04:02:09 PM »
Shane how far from the ocean are you?  Whats the temps over your way?  Its around 88 here today.  Not too bad.
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #29 on: July 14, 2018, 05:09:22 PM »
I put most of these grafts in the bathroom in my garage with AC set to 80 and grow lamp on 25%.  Since they are long distance scions I think this will be best for them.  In a couple weeks if the buds start to push I will move outside to acclimate.



This is a sharwil I did 2 weeks ago with scions off my own tree.  Buds are already popping.  This one is in 90F greenhouse 50% shade, and 60% humidity.  I have really good luck using my own scions.  They usually pop in 2 to 3 weeks and those are the trees that gain vigor and take.  If they take more than 4 weeks to pop they seem to stall and never take off and eventually die.


Brad Spaugh

shaneatwell

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #30 on: July 14, 2018, 06:30:22 PM »
Shane how far from the ocean are you?  Whats the temps over your way?  Its around 88 here today.  Not too bad.

Probably hit 84ish. 80 right now. 3 miles from the beach.
Shane

shaneatwell

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #31 on: July 14, 2018, 06:31:10 PM »
I like the clips!
Shane

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #32 on: July 17, 2018, 09:36:12 AM »
I put most of these grafts in the bathroom in my garage with AC set to 80 and grow lamp on 25%.  Since they are long distance scions I think this will be best for them.  In a couple weeks if the buds start to push I will move outside to acclimate.



This is a sharwil I did 2 weeks ago with scions off my own tree.  Buds are already popping.  This one is in 90F greenhouse 50% shade, and 60% humidity.  I have really good luck using my own scions.  They usually pop in 2 to 3 weeks and those are the trees that gain vigor and take.  If they take more than 4 weeks to pop they seem to stall and never take off and eventually die.



Brad, I've grown under grow lights and just a thought, not sure what lamps you're using but those lamps sure look far away from your pots.  One of the best tools I have is an old analog G.E. light meter that registers up to 10K foot candles.  No, it doesn't measure PAR but it's still a valuable tool, a guide.  I'd be giving those faves about 5,000 f.c.   Keep in mind Hawaii is around 22 latitude.  For long day/short night plants I kept the timer on a 20/4 on/off cycle to induce vegetative growth.  Citrus is photoperiod dependent, not sure about avocado.

FWIW, summer noon sun is 10k - 10,500 f.c., cloudless day, 27 latitude.

Good luck on the grafts.  I must have 6 Sharwil that are shooting the moon, one on a Gwen tree.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2018, 09:43:42 AM by Mark in Texas »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #33 on: July 17, 2018, 09:37:55 AM »

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #34 on: July 17, 2018, 02:13:34 PM »
I put most of these grafts in the bathroom in my garage with AC set to 80 and grow lamp on 25%.  Since they are long distance scions I think this will be best for them.  In a couple weeks if the buds start to push I will move outside to acclimate.



This is a sharwil I did 2 weeks ago with scions off my own tree.  Buds are already popping.  This one is in 90F greenhouse 50% shade, and 60% humidity.  I have really good luck using my own scions.  They usually pop in 2 to 3 weeks and those are the trees that gain vigor and take.  If they take more than 4 weeks to pop they seem to stall and never take off and eventually die.



Brad, I've grown under grow lights and just a thought, not sure what lamps you're using but those lamps sure look far away from your pots.  One of the best tools I have is an old analog G.E. light meter that registers up to 10K foot candles.  No, it doesn't measure PAR but it's still a valuable tool, a guide.  I'd be giving those faves about 5,000 f.c.   Keep in mind Hawaii is around 22 latitude.  For long day/short night plants I kept the timer on a 20/4 on/off cycle to induce vegetative growth.  Citrus is photoperiod dependent, not sure about avocado.

FWIW, summer noon sun is 10k - 10,500 f.c., cloudless day, 27 latitude.

Good luck on the grafts.  I must have 6 Sharwil that are shooting the moon, one on a Gwen tree.

Those are 4 x 50w of very efficient COB LEDs.  Its like 400w of MH or HPS.  Ive got the photo period synched to outside so I can move them freely in and out.  I wouldnt normally be putting avocados indoors.  Just taking some stress off them while the grafts heal.  So they are getting a mild stimulus from the lamp and low temps inside.  I have been dropping the lamp and turning up the current slowly.  They will get blasted with light and heat as soon as they start flushing.  Hopefully that happens.

I have been working with Simon a lot on various projects and one of the things I have learned from him is using grow lamps for grafting or rooting works really well.  So we will see how these go.  Will keep you posted.
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #35 on: July 18, 2018, 05:31:04 PM »
Those are 4 x 50w of very efficient COB LEDs.  Its like 400w of MH or HPS.  Ive got the photo period synched to outside so I can move them freely in and out.  I wouldnt normally be putting avocados indoors.  Just taking some stress off them while the grafts heal.  So they are getting a mild stimulus from the lamp and low temps inside.  I have been dropping the lamp and turning up the current slowly.  They will get blasted with light and heat as soon as they start flushing.  Hopefully that happens.

I have been working with Simon a lot on various projects and one of the things I have learned from him is using grow lamps for grafting or rooting works really well.  So we will see how these go.  Will keep you posted.

Interesting!  This would really work well for citrus during the winter, short day months.  I might have to dig out that old 600W HPS. ;)

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2018, 04:03:51 PM »
Well its been 3 weeks or so now.  Lost 1 of 12 of the grafts.  The other 11 are still green and just barely starting to buldge.  I removed the clips and the top of the parafilm to try and get them to draw some moisture and start flushing.  Fingers crossed.  This can go a few ways, they can stay green and buds sit there but wont budge.  They can dry out without the tape and die, or they will start flushing.  Im only removing the tape tips because these are inside and theres no wind to dry them out.  Outside, just making a small pin hole around the buds would be a better way to get them to draw some water up.  Everyday I go and remove any new shoots on the rootstocks.

« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 04:05:28 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2018, 04:45:02 PM »
Meanwhile, the sharwil I did off my own tree 5 weeks ago is going just fine outside in 100F and part shade.  Its crazy how much better fresh scion do.

Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #38 on: August 02, 2018, 02:37:01 AM »
I have a nishikawa graft that is pushing right now outside in ground.


Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #39 on: August 02, 2018, 02:43:57 PM »
Fresh scions about ready to push and a good rootstock with plenty of root mass is what it's all about.

Those are really good results Brad!

Good luck Khaled.

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #40 on: August 02, 2018, 02:53:36 PM »
Fresh scions about ready to push and a good rootstock with plenty of root mass is what it's all about.

Those are really good results Brad!

Good luck Khaled.

Hey Im not celebrating yet.  Ive had these things look like they are going to go before and they do nothing.  A few of them look like they may start growing though.  I wish there was a way to encourage the buds to push.  Anyone have any ideas how to coax them into sprouting shoots?
Brad Spaugh

alangr088

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #41 on: August 06, 2018, 08:04:54 PM »
Has anyone tried this method?

https://youtu.be/LWKDnFLBaq0


Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #42 on: August 07, 2018, 10:19:05 AM »
Hey Im not celebrating yet.  Ive had these things look like they are going to go before and they do nothing.

I've lost quite a few avocado grafts this year.  Just lost a Sharwil on a Gwen.  I figure the 18F finally did it in.  It's pushing up rootstock shoots now.

The Lamb Hass, 3 or 4 Sharwil and one Pinkerton I did on a frozen back Oro Negro are going nuts.  Helps to be on a massive root system.   Solo Pinkerton on another old tree is doing well too.



This picture doesn't do my recovering Reed justice.  This is probably the most gorgeous avocado I've ever grown, rehabilitated is more like it.  It's a good 9' tall by 6' or so wide.  I expect it to be 10' or so come winter.  Your pitaya cutting is protected from a west sun behind the Reed.   Will eventually put something in that 100 gal. bottomless "pot" aka raised bed.



« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 10:25:07 AM by Mark in Texas »

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #43 on: August 07, 2018, 10:40:43 AM »
Pinkerton on another frozen back tree.  This is what a Holiday, Pinkerton, Ardith, and Sir Prize were on before the Jan. freeze.  This thing is growing at a crawl.  I know its not vigorous but this seems ridiculous. 
 


BTW, that clover in the pot is a volunteer legume I broadcast on 14 acres about 14 years ago.  Stuff re-seeds and pops up in some weird places, like my greenhouse.  Have you considered a legume or green manure crop Brad?   I grew Elbon rye, hairy vetch and this Madrid yellow sweet clover for years before I farmed it.



spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #44 on: August 07, 2018, 10:42:35 AM »
Nice looking trees Mark.  Things are looking promising here.  I already got a few of the grafts to start pushing leaves and moved them outside in partial shade.  Im pushing my luck a bit moving them outside, its been 100F and low humidity.  Just don't want them to get too comfy indoors.  If all goes well these will be ready to plant by October. 





« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 11:01:32 AM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #45 on: August 07, 2018, 10:45:53 AM »
Hey Mark I have no idea about those crops you mentioned.  Not sure we can grow that kind of stuff here since theres no rain. 
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #46 on: August 07, 2018, 02:05:55 PM »
So the time that the cultivars make fruit does not matter. You will graft all cultivars the same time when your climate is right. Say in spring or summer.

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #47 on: August 14, 2018, 05:42:07 PM »
Hey Mark I have no idea about those crops you mentioned.  Not sure we can grow that kind of stuff here since theres no rain.

Probably not.  Most are drought tolerant with deep root systems though.

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #48 on: August 14, 2018, 05:52:36 PM »
Well the avocado grafts were a success.  Of 12, only 1 died and the rest look like they are going good.  I already put 5 of the 11 outside and they are growing nicely.  Getting ready to put a few more outside soon. And theres 2 or 3 slow pokes that are just now going.

I will take some photos on the weekend.
Brad Spaugh

ScottR

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #49 on: August 15, 2018, 11:12:09 AM »
great success rate Brad, nice work may they grow strong ;)

 

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