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Author Topic: Avocado grafting  (Read 6342 times)

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #50 on: August 15, 2018, 11:51:57 PM »
Thanks Scott, so far this indoor thing works really well.
 I think these will be ready to go in the ground in a month.  Heres the ones I have outside in full sun already.  It was around 87F today and that is mild enough to put them out for the first time in full sun.  Looks like the weather will stay under 90 for at least a week and I can capitalize on that with these.

Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #51 on: August 16, 2018, 09:42:46 AM »
Nice job, hope they don't burn as they have not been acclimated to full sun.  When folks have been growing anything under shade and that pretty much describes under lights as the output doesn't come near the 10,000 f.c. of a typical summer sun, I sit them on an east facing porch and give them full sun for a while up to say....10:00 a.m. gradually increasing their exposure until they're hardened up. 


spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #52 on: August 16, 2018, 10:17:22 AM »
Mark Im on it!  Breaking plants into full sun is like a full time job over here.  Ive got way too much practice doing this. 

The COB leds have full spectrum that mimics the sun including the UV component.   Plants transition really well to outside with this lamp.  You can't do this as quick with other types of grow light. 
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #53 on: August 16, 2018, 11:08:19 AM »
Heres some of the areas for breaking plants in.  Plants coming out of the greenhouse are even more tender than these little indoor plants.







Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #54 on: August 16, 2018, 03:12:42 PM »
Heres some of the areas for breaking plants in.  Plants coming out of the greenhouse are even more tender than these little indoor plants.








I figured after hitting the SEND button I should have kept my mouth shut.  You aint no newbie.  ;D

Looks great........

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #55 on: August 16, 2018, 03:27:29 PM »
I wont let them burn.  One of those was drooping a bit and it got moved back under the burlap.  The others are looking good and sit next to the passionfruit vines and get afternoon shade.  These puppies are going to be ready to plant really quick.  They dont do much them bam they are going good all of a sudden.  Pushing them quickly into as much sun as they can take speeds things along.  Someone mentioned doing grafting in winter, these things would be doing nada in winter.
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #56 on: August 17, 2018, 08:54:39 AM »
I wont let them burn.  One of those was drooping a bit and it got moved back under the burlap.  The others are looking good and sit next to the passionfruit vines and get afternoon shade.  These puppies are going to be ready to plant really quick.  They dont do much them bam they are going good all of a sudden.  Pushing them quickly into as much sun as they can take speeds things along.  Someone mentioned doing grafting in winter, these things would be doing nada in winter.

Keep us posted as this is pretty exciting.  Early spring is the best time to graft IMO, when budswell is just beginning to show, meaning sap is about to flow.

You know I'm not an organic purist, far from it but I recommend innoculating the rootball upon planting with an ecto mychorrizal fungi.  I innoculated my Xmas trees with both endo and ecto (conifers sync with the endo form), grapevines, landscape trees....everything.  Learned a lot about some which are nothing more than rocket fuels contaminated with trichoderma bacteria and some which are the real deal, viable.  My grapevines are a jungle and figure some of that vigor is due to the innoculation at planting.  I went almost 2 years without supplemental water and no fertilizer.  Still went nuts and we are in a central, more western area of Texas so we don't get more than the average of about 27" a year.



spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #57 on: August 17, 2018, 10:36:44 AM »
I wont let them burn.  One of those was drooping a bit and it got moved back under the burlap.  The others are looking good and sit next to the passionfruit vines and get afternoon shade.  These puppies are going to be ready to plant really quick.  They dont do much them bam they are going good all of a sudden.  Pushing them quickly into as much sun as they can take speeds things along.  Someone mentioned doing grafting in winter, these things would be doing nada in winter.

Keep us posted as this is pretty exciting.  Early spring is the best time to graft IMO, when budswell is just beginning to show, meaning sap is about to flow.

You know I'm not an organic purist, far from it but I recommend innoculating the rootball upon planting with an ecto mychorrizal fungi.  I innoculated my Xmas trees with both endo and ecto (conifers sync with the endo form), grapevines, landscape trees....everything.  Learned a lot about some which are nothing more than rocket fuels contaminated with trichoderma bacteria and some which are the real deal, viable.  My grapevines are a jungle and figure some of that vigor is due to the innoculation at planting.  I went almost 2 years without supplemental water and no fertilizer.  Still went nuts and we are in a central, more western area of Texas so we don't get more than the average of about 27" a year.



Mark, I will try and find some VAM.  For some of my nicer trees I throw some organic ferts w innoculant in when planting.  Avocado trees are kind of like weeds here, never do anything special for them and thry grow really easy.  Ive got a gallon of EM1 Im planning on activating in 5gal buckets then running through the fert injector onto everything.  It would be great if I could put something like VAM in a bucket and squirt all the trees at once with it.
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #58 on: August 17, 2018, 11:35:37 AM »
VAM contains stuff that doesn't dissolve like humic acids.  I'll post Carlos' photo of what he uses.  Great info with contacts too.



https://www.amazon.com/BioAg-grams-Endomycorrhizal-Plant-Inoculant/dp/B00J2FHVDI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1534520081&sr=8-3&keywords=vam

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #59 on: August 17, 2018, 11:41:44 AM »
VAM contains stuff that doesn't dissolve like humic acids.  I'll post Carlos' photo of what he uses.  Great info with contacts too.



https://www.amazon.com/BioAg-grams-Endomycorrhizal-Plant-Inoculant/dp/B00J2FHVDI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1534520081&sr=8-3&keywords=vam

Done, got the kilo size bag.

Got a few tons of pine mulch that is going out then this is getting put on it and watered in and then EM1 injection. 

Then Im going on vacation.
Brad Spaugh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #60 on: August 24, 2018, 08:39:59 AM »
VAM contains stuff that doesn't dissolve like humic acids.  I'll post Carlos' photo of what he uses.  Great info with contacts too.



https://www.amazon.com/BioAg-grams-Endomycorrhizal-Plant-Inoculant/dp/B00J2FHVDI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1534520081&sr=8-3&keywords=vam

Done, got the kilo size bag.

Got a few tons of pine mulch that is going out then this is getting put on it and watered in and then EM1 injection. 

Then Im going on vacation.

Wow, you deserve some time off. Take your pack off and have a good one!

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #61 on: March 12, 2019, 04:20:07 PM »
Update on the trees.  Planted out in fall.  They are still very tiny but starting to grow.























Brad Spaugh

Samu

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #62 on: March 12, 2019, 09:52:33 PM »
Brad, your young cados look so healthy!
I very much like the idea of setting up a "breaking in" area,
seems like you are an expert grafter/nurseryman now Brad!

Grand opening "Brad Spaugh" Nursery in view...?  :D
Sam

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #63 on: March 12, 2019, 10:35:09 PM »
Brad, your young cados look so healthy!
I very much like the idea of setting up a "breaking in" area,
seems like you are an expert grafter/nurseryman now Brad!

Grand opening "Brad Spaugh" Nursery in view...?  :D

Thanks samu.  I really want to sell more grafted avocado and mango trees but to be honest its a huge pain.  The weather is too extreme here to make it worthwhile. 

Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #64 on: March 12, 2019, 10:49:27 PM »
Heres hass tree I just put a bunch of sticks on that CA Hockey donated to me.  Thanks Khalid.  Hopefully Some of them take.  This time of year seems pretty ideal to do this stuff. 

Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #65 on: March 13, 2019, 12:28:45 PM »
Hi Brad, why are your grafts so far out on the branches???  you know it is going to be getting pretty hot AND BRIGHT SUNNY in your area soon.     Regards   Patrick

Vernmented

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #66 on: March 13, 2019, 01:22:26 PM »
Day grafted Jan. 8th




Day today



Whitsell, Don Gillogy, Day, Popenoe, Mexicola Grande, Monroe, Gwen, Choquette and a seedling that is reported to be excellent. Hopefully I will get some fruit to taste test this year.

-Josh

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #67 on: March 13, 2019, 01:30:23 PM »
Hi Brad, why are your grafts so far out on the branches???  you know it is going to be getting pretty hot AND BRIGHT SUNNY in your area soon.     Regards   Patrick

Patrick, I put them where they matched up diamter wise.  Then trimmed off extra branches to force energy to the grafted tips.  Now they are way out there, you are right.  Maybe it was a mistake?  I just want to save these here temporarily.  That entire tree will haveto be removed in a couple years. 

Yes, its going to be hot and sunny.  Should I tinfoil them?  I never really had a problem with scions in 80F sun to be honest.  The parafilm will keep them from getting dry. 
Brad Spaugh

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #68 on: March 13, 2019, 02:23:43 PM »
Day grafted Jan. 8th




Day today



Whitsell, Don Gillogy, Day, Popenoe, Mexicola Grande, Monroe, Gwen, Choquette and a seedling that is reported to be excellent. Hopefully I will get some fruit to taste test this year.



Nice collection.  I notice you got the blurple grow lamp in the background. 
« Last Edit: March 13, 2019, 02:39:32 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

Vernmented

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #69 on: March 13, 2019, 09:24:02 PM »

Nice collection.  I notice you got the blurple grow lamp in the background.

I was trying to get a head start on papayas to sell at a tree sale in May. It is just a cheapy Amazon cob. I had too much stuff and the light too high up for the small output.
-Josh

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #70 on: March 14, 2019, 08:47:37 AM »
Hi Brad, cados look great.  Got a Pinkerton pushing already, other 2 looking good with bud swell. Thanks.

Nothing beats the ease and efficiency of Surround.  A TB in a gallon and you've got a great whitewash.  I can't see going thru the trouble of foil or latex paint.  I've got 20# or so which enough to supply all of SoCal.  If you want some let me know.

https://www.groworganic.com/surround-25-lb.html

Pesticide ID required for California?  That's crazy.  It's nothing more than clay powder.

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #71 on: March 14, 2019, 10:02:35 AM »
Hi Brad, cados look great.  Got a Pinkerton pushing already, other 2 looking good with bud swell. Thanks.

Nothing beats the ease and efficiency of Surround.  A TB in a gallon and you've got a great whitewash.  I can't see going thru the trouble of foil or latex paint.  I've got 20# or so which enough to supply all of SoCal.  If you want some let me know.

https://www.groworganic.com/surround-25-lb.html

Pesticide ID required for California?  That's crazy.  It's nothing more than clay powder.

I got a bag of surround to use this summer.  That pesticide thing is a mistake on that website.  I ordered some last year.   
Brad Spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #72 on: March 14, 2019, 12:34:42 PM »
Hi Brad, cados look great.  Got a Pinkerton pushing already, other 2 looking good with bud swell. Thanks.

Nothing beats the ease and efficiency of Surround.  A TB in a gallon and you've got a great whitewash.  I can't see going thru the trouble of foil or latex paint.  I've got 20# or so which enough to supply all of SoCal.  If you want some let me know.

https://www.groworganic.com/surround-25-lb.html

Pesticide ID required for California?  That's crazy.  It's nothing more than clay powder.

I got a bag of surround to use this summer.  That pesticide thing is a mistake on that website.  I ordered some last year.
I've been interested in trying this too. I think Mark recommended it to me (Or someone else) and I've been interested since. Going to check my local orchard supply and see if they have smaller quantities as I only have 3 'cados going in the ground as soon as I drop my 25-30ft palm tree.
-Kris

Mark in Texas

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #73 on: March 15, 2019, 02:56:18 PM »
Vermented, nice to see someone using root tip pruning systems.  With the exception of my pineapples everything in the greenhouse is in RootBuilder. even pitaya I sell panels for $3 each at our scion exchanges.  10 panels = 100 gals. for example.

I used Griffin's Spin-Out for decades.

spaugh

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Re: Avocado grafting
« Reply #74 on: April 20, 2019, 09:10:06 PM »
I wanted to update this with some findings that may be useful to other people.  A month or so ago I did some grafts on an in ground tree and on several seedlings.  Its gotten quite hot here but the scions have done fine in full sun.  Just parafilm and clips on the grafts was used.  After 2-3 weeks the clip are removed.  Temps have hit 90 several times and no issues, grafts are still taking.  I also did a bunch of seedling trees and intentionally left them in full sun.  The grafts are taking no problem in strong spring sun.  And small new growth also unaffected.  So don't be afraid of sun when temps are under 90, it seems to be a non issue.

I had really good luck taking scions off of trees about to do their first good flush for the year.  Around mid march seems to be a great time to take scions with swollen buds.  I would say March is the best month to do grafting here.  Even with some buds being flower buds, doesnt matter. 

There will be extra grafted sharwil trees in a month or so if anyone wants any of those.  Im really impressed with the way sharwil is growing here and am planting more of them here.  Havent tried the fruit yet but by all account they are excellent.

Heres some not so great pics of the grafts









« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 09:12:30 PM by spaugh »
Brad Spaugh

 

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