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Author Topic: Mexican lemon tree Advice  (Read 235 times)

Lionking

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Mexican lemon tree Advice
« on: July 19, 2018, 07:07:35 PM »
I need some help....advice on what I might need to do to get my Mexican Lemon tree to grow leaves.
The tree is still growing.... slowly that is but it doesnít seem to grow any leaves on the lower branches.
I hate seeing it like this.  Is there anything I can do or nutrients I can give it to help it grow more leaves?
Here are a few pictures...









Yorgos

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2018, 10:37:48 AM »
The lime does look spindly.  Is it getting enough sun (like at least 6 hours, or more)?  Enough fertilizer? The fig behind it looks healthy enough.  It and that tree may be taking all the nutrients. Does the fig produce fruit?  If not there may be a shade or insufficient fertilizer regime.
Near NRG Stadium, Houston Texas. USDA zone 9a

Lionking

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2018, 11:38:15 AM »
The lime does look spindly.  Is it getting enough sun (like at least 6 hours, or more)?  Enough fertilizer? The fig behind it looks healthy enough.  It and that tree may be taking all the nutrients. Does the fig produce fruit?  If not there may be a shade or insufficient fertilizer regime.

The fig is producing lots of fruit.  As for the tree,  it is getting at least 8 hrs of sun.
I have been watering it at least every other day and giving it Superthrive every other watering.  I have just started to add sea kelp with the Superthrive. About 3 feedings ago?
Is that enough?  Should I also give it some slow release fertilizer?  I donít want to overdo it...
By the way,  thanks for the help

amory

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2018, 12:14:49 PM »
The lime does look spindly.  Is it getting enough sun (like at least 6 hours, or more)?  Enough fertilizer? The fig behind it looks healthy enough.  It and that tree may be taking all the nutrients. Does the fig produce fruit?  If not there may be a shade or insufficient fertilizer regime.

try remove all side branches . you will see it will be more strong.

SoCal2warm

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2018, 02:01:14 PM »
In your climate it has been very hot and dry the last month. Keep it consistently watered, and try to water deep (keeping the soil moist but give it a chance to partially dry so it isn't constantly waterlogged).

Millet

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2018, 03:17:34 PM »
LionKing, you need to feed your tree with real fertilizer.  Citrus absorb nutrients in a 5-1-3 ratio, meaning for every 5 parts nitrogen, the tree will also absorb 1 part phosphorous and 3 parts potassium.  From my experience, you can throw away "Superthrive", its pretty much worthless. Citrus are heavy feeders, requiring more nutrition than many plants.  Find a fertilizer with a formula that is higher in nitrogen and potassium that also  contains trace minerals, and feed your tree 4 times during the season.  You should have started a good fertilizer program for your tree last March.  You are starving the poor tree. Good fortune to this trees.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 08:42:15 PM by Millet »

Yorgos

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2018, 03:23:38 PM »
And I would not prune away any side branches.  The trunk looks pretty spindly as it is.  No need to make it worse.  Plus side branches will thicken the trunk and produce the leaves the tree needs (and the fruit).
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mrtexas

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2018, 05:48:33 PM »
LionKing, you need to feed your tree with real fertilizer.  Citrus absorb nutrients in a 5-1-3 ratio, meaning for every 5 parts nitrogen, the tree will also absorb 1 part phosphorous and 3 parts potassium.  From my experience, you can throw away "Superthrive", its pretty much worthless. Citrus are heavy feeders, requiring more nutrition than many plants.  Find a fertilizer with a formula that is higher in nitrogen and potassium that also  contains trace minerals, and feed your tree 4 times during the season.  You should have started a good fertilizer program for your tree last March.  You are starving the poor tree. Good fortune to this trees.

 ;D
« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 08:44:57 PM by Millet »

Lionking

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2018, 12:21:05 AM »
LionKing, you need to feed your tree with real fertilizer.  Citrus absorb nutrients in a 5-1-3 ratio, meaning for every 5 parts nitrogen, the tree will also absorb 1 part phosphorous and 3 parts potassium.  From my experience, you can throw away "Superthrive", its pretty much worthless. Citrus are heavy feeders, requiring more nutrition than many plants.  Find a fertilizer with a formula that is higher in nitrogen and potassium that also  contains trace minerals, and feed your tree 4 times during the season.  You should have started a good fertilizer program for your tree last March.  You are starving the poor tree. Good fortune to this trees.

I failed to state that I did fertilize it with Osmocote 14-14-14 in March.  About a month after that I fed it with Dr. Earth organic fruit tree fertilizer 5-5-2, 
3 weeks after not seeing any new leaf growth, I fed it with Alaska fish fertilizer 5-5-1
So at that point,  It did start showing new leafs growing but only on the upper part of the tree.
But then that stopped as well.  At this point,  I was thinking that I am doing more damage than good by giving it all these different fertilizers.
I think it was mid to late May and I tried yet one more fertilizer.... Happy frog fruit and flower...5-8-4.
Did I over do it?   Thatís one of the reasons Iíve been giving it Superthrive and sea Kelp lately.

Millet

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Re: Mexican lemon tree Advice
« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2018, 02:09:32 PM »
During the first few years, apply fertilizer to young trees to stimulate vigorous growth of leaves and branches that will become the framework of the mature tree.  Beginning about 2 weeks after planting, frequent light applications of fertilizer should be made approximately every 6 weeks.  Fertilizer should not be applied between October 1 and February 1 for the first year or two, most especially in colder regions. The goal of the fertilizer program for young fruit bearing trees is to continue to stimulate vigorous growth of leaves and branches that may compete with early fruit production.  After the tree has become established, the goal will be to replace nutrients removed by the fruit and to provide enough nutrients to sustain continued tree growth. Many different fertilizers formulations are available for use on dooryard citrus trees. In general, the numbers on a fertilizer bag refer to the percent of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium plus other secondary and micronutrients.  For example if the numbers 8-8-8 were listed on a fertilizer bag it would contain 8% nitrogen, 8% phosphorus and 8% potassium. Other nutrients like magnesium, copper, and boron may also be listed.  This type of fertilizer would be ideal for a nonbearing young citrus tree.  Higher analysis, mixed formulations such as 10-10-10, 12-12-12, or 15-0-14 are used on mature trees.  A 1 year old tree should be fertilized 6 times a growing season. A 2 year old tree should be fertilized 5 times per season. Three year old trees  4 times per season. Four year old trees and older fertilize three times a year.   For young trees, apply fertilizer uniformly in a 3-ft. diameter circle around the tree. As the tree becomes older, the area fertilized should be enlarge as the root system expands. As a rule of thumb, fertilize an area twice the diameter of the tree canopy.  Care should be taken to avoid root or trunk damage by uneven placement or mounding the fertilizer against the trunk. Purchase real fertilizer for your tree. Personally I would not use fertilizers such as  Dr. Earth and Alaska Fish fertilizer, your tree needs a real fertilizer.  Just looking at the tree it is quite easy to see that the poor thing is struggling to find some food to live on.  The best to you and your tree.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2018, 02:45:37 PM by Millet »

 

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