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Author Topic: Myrica rubra  (Read 7944 times)

Rtreid

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2012, 05:48:24 PM »
nullzero,

Thanks for the update, it is good to hear that you received your trees.

Richard

TriangleJohn

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #26 on: March 02, 2012, 04:26:49 PM »
Are the trees sexed? Are new cultivars perfect flowering? I always assumed I'd need a male and a female tree and I assumed the grafted one I have is a female.

SWRancher

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2012, 06:07:59 PM »
 ???Is there an english or common name instead of the latin "myrica rubra" for those without a botany degree?

fruitlovers

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #28 on: March 02, 2012, 06:15:57 PM »
???Is there an english or common name instead of the latin "myrica rubra" for those without a botany degree?

Most common english name i've heard is yumberry and bayberry. Here are some other version from wikipedia:
Chinese Bayberry, Japanese Bayberry, Red Bayberry, Yumberry, Waxberry, or Chinese strawberry tree
There was a good article about them in CRFG Fruit Gardener magazine a few issues back.
Oscar
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nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2012, 06:28:37 PM »
Posted a good PDF about Myrica rubra aka Yumberry under the online library section.
http://tropicalfruitforum.com/index.php?topic=515.0
« Last Edit: March 02, 2012, 06:35:27 PM by nullzero »
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SWRancher

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2012, 06:59:16 PM »
Thanks.

Joshua_TX

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #31 on: March 02, 2012, 09:43:40 PM »
Myrica rubra's common names include Yangmei in China, Yamamomo in Japan, Red Bayberry, Chinese Bayberry, and Yumberry.  According to the CRFG Fruit Gardener March & April 2008 issue, the fruit is called yang-mei in China, which means "poplar-plum".  A garden products importer from Indiana named Charles Stenftenagel was visiting a friend in Shanghai who bottled Myrica rubra juice.  The way the people pronounced yang-mei in their dialect was "yang-mee", which Mr. Stenftenagel thought sounded like "yummy" and in 2003 they started calling it "Yumberry" because they though that would be a catchy name to help them commercialize it.  Just like chinese gooseberry becoming kiwifruit, tree tomato being sold as tamarillo, african horned melon being trademarked as kiwano, chilean guava being marketed as tazziberry (can you get any cornier?  It's from Chile, not Tasmania for godsakes!).

The Chinese have harvested yang-mei from the wild for 7000 years and cultivated the trees for at least 2000 years.  It is a very popular fruit in China, which has 865,000 acres in production.  For comparison, the United States has about 432,000 acres of apples, about 856,000 of citrus trees, and 1,044,000 of grapes, the only American fruit crop with greater acreage.

It is a dioecious tree with male and female flowers on separate plants.  However some female trees will produce male flowers.  The tree can grow in poor soils because of its ability to fix nitrogen.  It prefers acid soil and enjoys a similar climatic range as citrus.  It is said that it is not grown in Hawaii because it does require a bit of chill, although in China there is a wide range of adaptation, including tropical varieties on Hainan, a large island in the south.  Recommended for Zones 8-10, can tolerate temperatures down to 16F.

As many of you know the recent California importation of grafted Myrica rubra cultivars from China has arrived.  The minimum order was 100 trees so many people pulled together to make a collective order.  There were three varieties offered: Dongkui, Ding'ao, and Wusu.  All three are female but Dongkui also produces male flowers. 
Below is a link that you may find very helpful.
https://docs.google.com/present/view?id=ddzvzz9g_2zcnbbxcp
To save a copy to your computer, click "Actions" on the bar on the bottom of the screen, then "Download as PDF".

Here is the often-searched-for Myrica rubra article from the CRFG Fruit Gardener:











-Joshua

ASaffron

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #32 on: March 03, 2012, 12:38:36 AM »
i know where a fruiter is, (M. rubra), saw berries on it.  Is budwood something of interest to u fanatics?

fruitlovers

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #33 on: March 03, 2012, 12:49:54 AM »
Has anyone tasted this yumberry? Is it really yummy?
Oscar
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nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #34 on: March 03, 2012, 12:59:39 AM »
Must be pretty good considering the large amount of arces planted out, even more so then citrus. The Chinese culture has a good taste for fruit, excellent fruit breeding done the last 5,000 years :).
« Last Edit: March 03, 2012, 01:01:26 AM by nullzero »
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fruitlovers

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #35 on: March 03, 2012, 01:08:17 AM »
Must be pretty good considering the large amount of arces planted out, even more so then citrus. The Chinese culture has a good taste for fruit, excellent fruit breeding done the last 5,000 years :).

Yes i totally agree with you. Just wondering how many people here in USA would like yumberry? Chinese are also very fond of durian, but even on this forum of fruit fans you hear durian put downs!  ::)
Oscar
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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #36 on: March 03, 2012, 04:12:46 AM »
Seed grown ones can be very resinous.
There are a few videos from the local research station on this page: http://www.youtube.com/user/Varietyaccess1?feature=watch

Felipe

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #37 on: March 03, 2012, 07:20:40 AM »
Just wondering how many people here in USA would like yumberry? Chinese are also very fond of durian, but even on this forum of fruit fans you hear durian put downs!  ::)
Oscar

Chinese are also very fond of lychee...  ;)

TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #38 on: March 03, 2012, 08:23:39 AM »
From what I understand, this plant is NOT on the quarantine list.  Just find out what the CA group did in the way of permits and such and do the same.

Null...did Customs ever explain the reason for the delay...other than because they can?

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #39 on: March 03, 2012, 12:32:20 PM »
From what I understand, this plant is NOT on the quarantine list.  Just find out what the CA group did in the way of permits and such and do the same.

Null...did Customs ever explain the reason for the delay...other than because they can?

Ohiojay,

I am not sure of the exact details, I am only forward chain emails which state what happened etc. I know Tynan stated he wanted to do a second order, I am still waiting on the details. Perhaps you guys can join in on that order. I can work something out with you guys if you need me to pick it up and ship it out.
Grow mainly edible and herbal plants. Favorites are the fruits, vegetables, and tea plants.

Joshua_TX

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #40 on: March 03, 2012, 08:30:52 PM »
From what I understand these had no restrictions or post-entry quarantine needed, just an import permit, phytosanitary certificates, and some spraying at the origin.

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #41 on: March 03, 2012, 09:38:26 PM »
Myrica rubra are not doing well at all, I will post pics (in a few hours, going to be busy) but they are not pretty... At least the stems are still green  :-\

Added picture, not looking good. The shock from the travel customs delay and 2 day delay planting (had someone pick it up for me). Well the stems are still green at this point, I am expecting a low chance of recovery.

« Last Edit: March 04, 2012, 01:44:02 AM by nullzero »
Grow mainly edible and herbal plants. Favorites are the fruits, vegetables, and tea plants.

fruitlovers

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #42 on: March 04, 2012, 01:50:26 AM »
Those leaves look totally dried out. If i were you i would remove the leaves to reduce further dehydration, then place plants in shade in a mist box, or under frequent hand misting.
Oscar
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nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #43 on: March 04, 2012, 01:57:03 AM »
Those leaves look totally dried out. If i were you i would remove the leaves to reduce further dehydration, then place plants in shade in a mist box, or under frequent hand misting.
Oscar

Planted in a mostly shaded area with a humidity level between 30-60%.
Grow mainly edible and herbal plants. Favorites are the fruits, vegetables, and tea plants.

fruitlovers

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #44 on: March 04, 2012, 02:12:19 AM »
Those leaves look totally dried out. If i were you i would remove the leaves to reduce further dehydration, then place plants in shade in a mist box, or under frequent hand misting.
Oscar

Planted in a mostly shaded area with a humidity level between 30-60%.

Good on the shade. Suggest total shade. I would raise humidity level to 80+%. Biggest danger right now is that those plants will totally dehydrate. If they start to releaf than slowly drop humidity and slowly move into dappled sunlight. A very diluted, 1/2 strength or less, liquid fertilizer might also help.
Oscar
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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #45 on: March 04, 2012, 03:19:41 AM »
I totally agree with Oscar..

TropicalFruitHunters

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #46 on: March 04, 2012, 09:15:27 AM »
Null...if mist box is not an option, put the plant under plastic to boost that humidity.  That has been our only sure way of success with bare root plants.

Tim

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #47 on: March 05, 2012, 09:52:01 AM »
Null...if mist box is not an option, put the plant under plastic to boost that humidity.  That has been our only sure way of success with bare root plants.

100% agreed ... I've killed plenty of bareroots thinking they're in my house at controlled temp with running humidifier.  Throw a clear plastic bag over it and keep the moist in for a good month or so, then follow Oscar's advice on slowly drop humidity & increase sun light. 
Tim

nullzero

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #48 on: March 05, 2012, 12:08:34 PM »
I have a white trash bag over them, lets hope it works.. Not expecting much but if I have a survivor I will be very happy.
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fruitlovers

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Re: Myrica rubra
« Reply #49 on: March 05, 2012, 04:20:20 PM »
I have a white trash bag over them, lets hope it works.. Not expecting much but if I have a survivor I will be very happy.

You probably know this...but just in case...plastic bag should have some vents or holes at the bottom, you don't want the plant to sweat to death and with no CO2 available either.
Oscar
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