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Author Topic: My first mango tree  (Read 368 times)

TooFarNorth

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My first mango tree
« on: August 06, 2018, 07:21:16 PM »
Ok..I bought a Glenn mango tree. I'm starting off small. Glenn is supposed to be pretty much trouble free from what I have read. It will have to stay in a container, so I need to keep it fairly small.  My question is whether to prune it back below the ring of buds now, after it's first flush, or wait for it to finish hardening off? If I cut it just below the ring of buds, it will be 30 inches tall. Should I wait and prune after next flush. Any help will be appreciated.





TFN


AlexTrees

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2018, 08:57:05 PM »
Congrats on your first tree, i ďpuggedĒ my trees at about 18 - 24 inches. I made my cuts just above internode ring. These are my trees 3 years later. Also an M4 that I recently purchased and pugged.Good luck and welcome to the mango community.








nighthawk0911@yahoo.com

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2018, 09:58:27 PM »
Glenn is a great first tree and my favorite early.  For your next tree try a Carrie which is mid season.
Blessed be the man who plants a tree knowing he will never live to enjoy it's fruit or shade.

bulldawg305

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2018, 10:45:28 PM »
Your Carrie fruits mid-season there? It's normally early season in S. FL.

TooFarNorth

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2018, 08:02:32 AM »
Hey, AlexTrees.  Thanks, but now I'm confused. Everything I read about pruning mango trees, sounded exactly like pruning stone or pome fruit. In which case you never want your scaffold limbs all coming from a central point off of the trunk, but rather spaced out. Is this something unique to mango, or is it more for container culture.  According to Fairchild and other resources I was going to cut below the ring of buds, or is this just for field application?




TFN

skhan

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2018, 08:19:56 AM »
Hey, AlexTrees.  Thanks, but now I'm confused. Everything I read about pruning mango trees, sounded exactly like pruning stone or pome fruit. In which case you never want your scaffold limbs all coming from a central point off of the trunk, but rather spaced out. Is this something unique to mango, or is it more for container culture.  According to Fairchild and other resources I was going to cut below the ring of buds, or is this just for field application?


TFN

From my understanding, having the branching points spaced makes for a stronger tree.
I think most people here would recommend when tip prunning to cut off ring and let the tree branch below. (like Dr. Campbells Videos)

In this particular case, I don't really know if it matters much since you'll be keeping them small.
The problem arises when you have a 15ft tree loaded with fruit in the wind.
All the braches pulling in different directions from a single point won't be good.
Khan's Edible Oasis
Yard as of Jan 2018

TooFarNorth

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2018, 09:49:50 AM »
Thanks, skhan. That makes sense.


TFN

AlexTrees

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2018, 05:18:57 PM »
https://youtu.be/zh1AnvNa6mc

This is a video thatís been shared on the forum before. I pretty much followed these guidelines. At about 8:30 into the video it details pruning instructions, I recommend watching the whole video, very informative!

nighthawk0911@yahoo.com

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2018, 05:30:31 PM »
Your Carrie fruits mid-season there? It's normally early season in S. FL.

Here in 9B I don't start picking Carrie till early July and they haven't broken color yet.  Would rather wait till almost mid-July but usually have to take them early or the bushy tailed rats and other critters get most of them. We're generally about a month behind on most mango varieties compared to SE Florida Z/10.

In 15 years I've never had a peach or nectarines off my trees as the squirrels take every last one while still green.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 05:32:16 PM by nighthawk0911@yahoo.com »
Blessed be the man who plants a tree knowing he will never live to enjoy it's fruit or shade.

Clay

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2018, 02:42:10 PM »
https://youtu.be/zh1AnvNa6mc

This is a video thatís been shared on the forum before. I pretty much followed these guidelines. At about 8:30 into the video it details pruning instructions, I recommend watching the whole video, very informative!

For training pruning, the video recommends making the cuts just above the nodes, to encourage multiple (4 to 6) branches from that spot, and then pruning out the weaker shoots to leave just three or four branches. Others recommend pruning just below the nodes, such that it encourages one or two branches, in the desired growth direction. These seem like opposite approaches. Does the approach depend on the growing environment? Or is it just a matter of personal preference? Is one approach preferred over the other here in Coastal Southern California?

Clay
<<<< Clay >>>>
Orange County, CA 92626

behlgarden

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2018, 03:57:59 PM »
https://youtu.be/zh1AnvNa6mc

This is a video thatís been shared on the forum before. I pretty much followed these guidelines. At about 8:30 into the video it details pruning instructions, I recommend watching the whole video, very informative!

For training pruning, the video recommends making the cuts just above the nodes, to encourage multiple (4 to 6) branches from that spot, and then pruning out the weaker shoots to leave just three or four branches. Others recommend pruning just below the nodes, such that it encourages one or two branches, in the desired growth direction. These seem like opposite approaches. Does the approach depend on the growing environment? Or is it just a matter of personal preference? Is one approach preferred over the other here in Coastal Southern California?

Clay

those new and dont know, none of this would help if your tree is on turpentine rootstock as sooner or later the entire tree would droop with weak branches. I like to get 5 or 6 branches at 24 inches, then I limit them to 3-4, and keep pugging and pruning to have max two branches at ever 18 inches max.

pineislander

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2018, 09:21:19 PM »
https://youtu.be/zh1AnvNa6mc

This is a video thatís been shared on the forum before. I pretty much followed these guidelines. At about 8:30 into the video it details pruning instructions, I recommend watching the whole video, very informative!


For training pruning, the video recommends making the cuts just above the nodes, to encourage multiple (4 to 6) branches from that spot, and then pruning out the weaker shoots to leave just three or four branches. Others recommend pruning just below the nodes, such that it encourages one or two branches, in the desired growth direction. These seem like opposite approaches. Does the approach depend on the growing environment? Or is it just a matter of personal preference? Is one approach preferred over the other here in Coastal Southern California? Clay

If you are formative pruning cut below an internode ring. This will activate buds to grow in leaf axils which will be farther apart than if you cut at or just above an internode ring. If you allow a dormant branch tip to bud out on its own, depending on variety and vigor you might have 3-4-5-6-7 or 8 buds break at exactly the same point on the branch.

There are some pictures in this paper, the technical name for growth ring is intercalation, and the name for a flush of growth along a branch is an intercalary unit.

http://www.growables.org/information/documents/MangoPruningStrategies.pdf



sapote

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Re: My first mango tree
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2018, 10:18:59 PM »
Hey, AlexTrees.  Thanks, but now I'm confused. Everything I read about pruning mango trees, sounded exactly like pruning stone or pome fruit. In which case you never want your scaffold limbs all coming from a central point off of the trunk, but rather spaced out. Is this something unique to mango, or is it more for container culture.  According to Fairchild and other resources I was going to cut below the ring of buds, or is this just for field application?

Mango doesn't have branching habit like stone fruits. A mango branch from the trunk might only have one dominant lead and nothing else.




TFN

 

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